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1.
Epilepsy Behav ; 125: 108376, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1514332

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social factors are believed to affect mental health in patients with epilepsy (PWE). However, there is still a lack of sufficient manifest proof, given the difficulty of exposing PWE to relatively consistent natural social environments with a low or high level of social interaction to study their significant role. METHODS: This single-center, longitudinal study was conducted via online questionnaires during the coronavirus disease 2019. PWE were recruited from downtown Wuhan and surrounding areas. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 were used to assess psychological status. RESULTS: We analyzed 588 questionnaires completed by 294 PWE who participated in the dual survey. Under lockdown and reopening, the prevalence of anxiety was 13.6%/22.5%, and the prevalence of depression was 19.4%/34.0%. Raising children and seizure-related characteristics, including uncontrolled seizures, seizure exacerbation, seizure frequency ≥ 2/m, and changes in drug regimen, were risk factors in the first and second surveys. A high education level (OR = 1.946, 95% CI = 1.191-3.182), low life satisfaction (OR = 1.940, 95% CI = 1.007-3.737), worry about unanticipated seizures (OR = 2.147, 95% CI = 1.049-4.309), and worry about purchasing medication outside (OR = 2.063, 95% CI = 1.060-4.016) were risk factors for higher scores after reopening. Worry about unanticipated seizures (OR = 3.012, 95% CI = 1.302-6.965) and in-person medical consultation (OR = 2.319, 95% CI = 1.262-4.261) were related to newly diagnosed patients with psychological disorder after reopening. CONCLUSIONS: We identified an association between social variables and epileptic psychiatric comorbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety Disorders , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Epilepsy/complications , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 701032, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302131

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) outbreak and a 3-month lockdown of Wuhan may have had a long-term impact on the mental health of frontline healthcare workers (HWs). However, there is still a lack of comparative studies on the mental health of front-line HWs in the initial phase of the lockdown and 1 month after the lifting of the lockdown. Methods: We recruited 1717 HWs during the initial phase of the lockdown and 2214 HWs 1 month after the lifting of the lockdown, and their baseline characteristics and psychiatric health in these two phases were compared. Furthermore, Pearson's Chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to determine the possible risk factors associated with depressive symptoms in the front-line HWs. Results: Compared with the initial phase of the lockdown, the proportion of HWs with anxiety symptoms and stress decreased, while the proportion of HWs with depressive symptoms increased a month after the lifting of the lockdown. Male sex, exercise habit, comorbidities, and having family members or relatives with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infection were significantly related to the increased incidence of depressive symptoms during the initial phase of the lockdown. Comorbidities, negative effect of media coverage, working >4 days a week, lower annual household income, and deteriorating relationships with family members were associated with depressive symptoms a month after the lifting of the lockdown. Conclusion: The increased proportion of HWs with depressive symptoms 1 month after the lifting of the lockdown suggested that mental health of front-line HWs should be a top-priority issue, not only during, but also after the pandemic.

3.
Seizure ; 88: 102-108, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164463

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on the behaviours, mental health and seizure control of adult patients with epilepsy (PWE) and to identify the correlation of seizure increase and the COVID-19 outbreak to guide the medical care of individuals with epilepsy during a public health crisis. METHODS: This study was conducted at 28 centres from February 2020 to April 2020. Participants filled out a 62-item online survey including sociodemographic, COVID-19-related, epilepsy-related and psychological variables and were divided into two groups based on whether their seizure frequency increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Chi-square tests and t-tests were used to test differences in significant characteristics. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to identify risk factors for seizure worsening. RESULTS: A total of 1,237 adult PWE were enrolled for analysis. Of this sample, 31 (8.33%) patients experienced an increase in seizures during the pandemic. Multivariate logistic regression suggested that feeling nervous about the pandemic (P < 0.05), poor quality of life (P = 0.001), drug reduction/withdrawal (P = 0.032), moderate anxiety during the COVID-19 outbreak (P = 0.046) and non-seizure free before the COVID-19 outbreak (P < 0.05) were independently related to seizure increase during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, PWE with poor quality of life and mental status, as well as AED reduction/withdrawal, were more likely to experience seizure increase. This observation highlights the importance of early identification of the population at high risk of seizure worsening and implementation of preventive strategies during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Quality of Life/psychology , Seizures/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 133, 2021 02 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091497

ABSTRACT

We conducted a multicentre cross-sectional survey of COVID-19 patients to evaluate the acute psychological impact on the patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) during isolation treatment based on online questionnaires from 2 February to 5 March 2020. A total of 460 COVID-19 patients from 13 medical centers in Hubei province were investigated for their mental health status using online questionnaires (including Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, Patient Health Questionnaire-15, and Insomnia Severity Index scales). Among all 460 COVID-19 patients, 187 (40.65%) of them were healthcare workers (HCWs). 297 (64.57%) of them were females. The most common psychological problems were somatization symptoms (66.09%, n = 304), followed by depression (53.48%, n = 246), anxiety (46.30%, n = 213), problems of insomnia (42.01%, n = 171), and then self-mutilating or suicidal thoughts (23.26%, n = 107). Of all the patients, 15.65% (n = 72) had severe somatization symptoms, and 2.83% (n = 13) had severe (almost every day) self-mutilating or suicidal thoughts. The most common psychological problems for HCWs were somatization symptoms (67.84%, n = 125), followed by depression (51.87%, n = 97), anxiety (44.92%, n = 84), problems of insomnia (36.18%, n = 55), and then self-mutilating or suicidal thoughts (20.86%, n = 39). Patients with lower education levels were found to be associated with higher incidence of self-mutilating or suicidal thoughts (odds ratio [OR], 2.68, 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.66-4.33 [P < 0.001]). Patients with abnormal body temperature were found to be associated with higher incidence of self-mutilating or suicidal thoughts (OR, 3.97, 95% CI, 2.07-7.63 [P < 0.001]), somatic symptoms (OR, 2.06, 95% CI, 1.20-3.55 [P = 0.009]) and insomnia (OR, 1.66, 95% CI, 1.04-2.65 [P = 0.033]). Those with suspected infected family members displayed a higher prevalence of anxiety than those without infected family members (OR, 1.61, 95% CI, 1.1-2.37 [P = 0.015]). Patients at the age of 18-44 years old had fewer somatic symptoms than those aged over 45 years old (OR, 1.91, 95% CI, 1.3-2.81 [P = 0.001]). In conclusion, COVID-19 patients tended to have a high prevalence of adverse psychological events. Early identification and intervention should be conducted to avoid extreme events such as self-mutilating or suicidal impulsivity for COVID-19 patients, especially for those with low education levels and females who have undergone divorce or bereavement.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Somatoform Disorders/psychology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Suicidal Ideation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
5.
J Affect Disord ; 281: 312-320, 2021 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-949938

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the prevalence of psychological disorders and associated factors at different stages of the COVID-19 epidemic in China. METHODS: The mental health status of respondents was assessed via the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 (GAD-7) scale. RESULTS: 5657 individuals participated in this study. History of chronic disease was a common risk factor for severe present depression (OR 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.82-2.66, p < 0.001), anxiety (OR 2.41, 95% CI, 1.97-2.95, p < 0.001), and insomnia (OR 2.33, 95% CI, 1.83-2.95, p < 0.001) in the survey population. Female respondents had a higher risk of depression (OR 1.61, 95% CI, 1.39-1.87, p < 0.001) and anxiety (OR 1.35, 95% CI, 1.15-1.57, p < 0.001) than males. Among the medical workers, confirmed or suspected positive COVID-19 infection as associated with higher scores for depression (confirmed, OR 1.87; suspected, OR 4.13), anxiety (confirmed, OR 3.05; suspected, OR 3.07), and insomnia (confirmed, OR 3.46; suspected, OR 4.71). LIMITATION: The cross-sectional design of present study presents inference about causality. The present psychological assessment was based on an online survey and on self-report tools, albeit using established instruments. We cannot estimate the participation rate, since we cannot know how many potential subjects received and opened the link for the survey. CONCLUSIONS: Females, non-medical workers and those with a history of chronic diseases have had higher risks for depression, insomnia, and anxiety. Positive COVID-19 infection status was associated with higher risk of depression, insomnia, and anxiety in medical workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Chronic Disease , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology
6.
Epilepsia ; 61(9): 1884-1893, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-697173

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Stress is a known trigger for seizures in patients with epilepsy (PWE). However, the association between stress and seizures has not been thoroughly investigated. In December 2019, an outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) occurred in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, causing tremendous collateral stress. This study was designed to evaluate the influence of the COVID-19 outbreak on seizures in PWE in the most severely affected area, Wuhan, and its surrounding cities. METHODS: In this single-center, cross-sectional study, PWE were surveyed via online questionnaires between February 23 and March 5, 2020. Collected data included demographic information, epilepsy-related characteristics (seizure type, frequency, antiepileptic drugs [AEDs], and medication management), direct and perceived threat of COVID-19, and changes in seizures during the outbreak. Psychological comorbidities were evaluated by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 items, and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify precipitants for seizure exacerbation. RESULTS: We received 362 completed questionnaires after excluding 12 duplicates (response rate = 63.51%). A total of 31 (8.56%) patients had increased seizures during the outbreak. Exposure history to COVID-19 (P = .001), uncontrolled seizure after AED therapy (P = .020), seizure frequency of two or more times per month before the outbreak (P = .005), change of AED regimen during the outbreak (AED reduction, withdrawal, replacement, skipping altogether; P = .002), and worry about the adverse effect of the outbreak on overall seizure-related issues (severity = moderate to critical; P = .038) were risk factors for increased seizures. SIGNIFICANCE: A minority of PWE experienced seizure exacerbation during the outbreak of COVID-19. Stress, uncontrolled seizures, and inappropriate change in AED regimen were associated with increased seizures. Based on these findings, stress might be an independent precipitant for triggering seizures in some PWE.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Epilepsy/psychology , Seizures/psychology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Symptom Flare Up , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
7.
EClinicalMedicine ; 24: 100443, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-613224

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of COVID-19 has laid unprecedented threats and challenges to health workers (HWs) in Wuhan, China. We aimed to assess the sociodemographic characteristics and hospital support measures associated with the immediate psychological impact on HWs at Tongji Hospital in Wuhan during COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: We conducted a single-center, cross-sectional survey of HWs via online questionnaires between February 8th and 10th, 2020. We evaluated stress, depression and anxiety by IES-R, PHQ-9, and GAD-7, respectively. We also designed a questionnaire to assess the perceptions of threat of COVID-19, and the satisfactions of the hospital's support measures. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify associated variables of acute stress, depression, and anxiety. FINDINGS: We received 5062 completed questionnaires (response rate, 77.1%). 29.8%, 13.5% and 24.1% HWs reported stress, depression and anxiety symptoms. Women (odds ratio [OR], 1.31; 95% CI, 0.47-0.97; p = 0.032), years of working >10 years (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.47-2.79; p<0.001), concomitant chronic diseases (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.27-1.80; p<0.001), history of mental disorders (OR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.77-6.05; p<0.001), family members or relatives confirmed or suspected (OR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02-1.48; p = 0.03), hospital-based and department-based care (OR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.60-0.97; p = 0.024) and full coverage of all departments for avoiding nosocomial infection (OR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.53-0.89; p = 0.004) were associated with stress. INTERPRETATION: Women and those who have more than 10 years of working, concomitant chronic diseases, history of mental disorders, and family members or relatives confirmed or suspected are susceptible to stress, depression and anxiety among HWs during the pandemic. In addition, since HWs often have a greater stigma against mental problems than the general public, it is worthwhile to address the needs of the HWs during this pandemic and to provide appropriate psychological supports for those people at high risk of mental problems.

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