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1.
Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolism ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2019215

ABSTRACT

Aim Materials and Methods Results Conclusion To provide a detailled analysis of the microvascular burden in patients with diabetes hopitalized for COVD‐19.We analysed data from the French CORONADO initiative and the UK Association of British Clinical Diabetologists (ABCD) COVID‐19 audit, two nationwide multicentre studies, and the AMERICADO, a multicentre study conducted in New York area. We assessed the association between risk of all‐cause death during hospital stay and the following microvascular complications in patients with diabetes hospitalized for COVID‐19: diabetic retinopathy and/or diabetic kidney disease and/or history of diabetic foot ulcer.Among 2951 CORONADO, 3387 ABCD COVID‐19 audit and 9327 AMERICADO participants, microvascular diabetic complications status was ascertained for 1314 (44.5%), 1809 (53.4%) and 7367 (79.0%) patients, respectively: 1010, 1059 and 1800, respectively, had ≥1 severe microvascular complication(s) and 304, 750 and 5567, respectively, were free of any complications. The patients with isolated diabetic kidney disease had an increased risk of all‐cause death during hospital stay: odds ratio [OR] 2.53 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.66‐3.83), OR 1.24 (95% CI 1.00‐1.56) and OR 1.66 (95% CI 1.40‐1.95) in the CORONADO, the ABCD COVID‐19 national audit and the AMERICADO studies, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD), compared to those without microvascular complications, patients with microvascular complications had an increased risk of all‐cause death during hospital stay in the CORONADO, the ABCD COVID‐19 diabetes national audit and the AMERICADO studies: adjusted OR (adjOR) 2.57 (95% CI 1.69‐3.92), adjOR 1.22 (95% CI 1.00‐1.52) and adjOR 1.33 (95% CI 1.15‐1.53), respectively. In meta‐analysis of the three studies, compared to patients free of complications, those with microvascular complications had an unadjusted OR for all‐cause death during hospital stay of 2.05 (95% CI 1.42‐2.97), which decreased to 1.62 (95% CI 1.19‐2.119) after adjustment for age and sex, and to 1.50 (1.12‐2.02) after hypertension and CVD were further added to the model.Microvascular burden is associated with an increased risk of death in patients hospitalized for COVID‐19. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolism is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

2.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 412, 2022 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846811

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To understand the use of online antenatal education classes accessed via the Mother and Child Health Handbook app during the COVID-19 pandemic in order to provide a basis and suggestions for optimizing Internet education during pregnancy under public health emergencies. METHODS: We compared and analyzed the use of online antenatal education classes via the Mother and Child Health Handbook app in Hangzhou in 2019 and 2020 (during the COVID-19 pandemic). RESULTS: Between January 1, 2019, and December 31, 2020, a total of 229,794 pregnant women created files and registered for the app, including 124,273 women in 2019 and 105,521 women in 2020. More pregnant women participated in online antenatal education learning (n = 36,379/34.5% vs. 29,226/23.5%, p = 0.000) in 2020 than in 2019. The proportion of pregnant women in the 18-34-year-old group who participated in online learning was higher than that in the advanced age group, and the difference was statistically significant (2019: 24.3% vs. 18.8%, p = 0.000) (2020: 35.7% vs. 27.4%, p = 0.000). More pregnant women accessed online antenatal education during early pregnancy (n = 13,463/37.0% vs. 9088/31.1%, p = 0.000) in 2020 than in 2019. Similar percentages of pregnant women participated in online antenatal education during mid-pregnancy (n = 15,426/52.8% vs. 19,269/53.0%, p = 0.639) in 2019 and 2020. Fewer pregnant women accessed online antenatal education during late pregnancy (n = 10,246/28.2% vs. 9476/32.4%, p = 0.000) in 2020 than in 2019. Fewer pregnant women choose to take 'Puerperal Health' courses in 2020 than in 2019 (early pregnancy: 36.20% vs. 42.79%, p = 0.000; mid-pregnancy: 41.65% vs. 48.19%, p = 0.000; late pregnancy: 55.31% vs. 58.41%, p = 0.000). Fewer pregnant women choose to take 'Psychological Adjustment' courses in 2020 than in 2019 (early pregnancy: 21.59% vs. 29.60%, p = 0.000; mid-pregnancy: 26.20% vs. 40.50%, p = 0.000; late pregnancy: 12.79% vs. 42.53%, p = 0.000). More pregnant women choose to study 'Nutrition and Exercise' in 2020 than in 2019 (early pregnancy: 44.48% vs. 25.95%, p = 0.000; mid-pregnancy: 47.77% vs. 40.75%, p = 0.000; late pregnancy: 55.94% vs. 42.99%, p = 0.000). "Pregnancy Care and Fetal Development" was the most selected course by pregnant women in early pregnancy (2019: 67.50%; 2020: 71.39%) and middle pregnancy (2019: 67.01%; 2020: 82.05%), and the proportion in 2020 was higher than it was in 2019. "Baby care" was the most selected course by pregnant women in late pregnancy, and the proportion in 2020 was higher than it was in 2019 (78.31% vs. 72.85%). CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, online antenatal education was well-used by pregnant women. More women participated in the online antenatal education modules during the COVID-19 pandemic than during 2019.The proportion of choosing different courses for pregnant women before and after the COVID-19 epidemic varied, and the learning course needs of pregnant women in different trimesters were different.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Mobile Applications , Prenatal Education , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women/psychology , Prenatal Care , Young Adult
3.
Diabetes Spectr ; 35(1): 118-128, 2022 Feb 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699134

ABSTRACT

Telehealth has emerged as an evolving care management strategy that is playing an increasingly vital role, particularly with the onset of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. A meta-analysis of 20 randomized controlled trials was conducted to test the effectiveness of home telemonitoring (HTM) in patients with type 2 diabetes in reducing A1C, blood pressure, and BMI over a median 180-day study duration. HTM was associated with a significant reduction in A1C by 0.42% (P = 0.0084). Although we found statistically significant changes in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure (-0.10 mmHg [P = 0.0041] and -0.07 mmHg [P = 0.044], respectively), we regard this as clinically nonsignificant in the context of HTM. Comparisons across different methods of transmitting vital signs suggest that patients logging into systems with moderate interaction with the technology platform had significantly higher reductions in A1C than those using fully automatic transmission methods or fully manual uploading methods. A1C did not vary significantly by study duration (from 84 days to 5 years). HTM has the potential to provide patients and their providers with timely, up-to-date information while simultaneously improving A1C.

4.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325432

ABSTRACT

Background: Elderly patients with COVID-19 were shown to have a high case-fatality rate. We aimed to explore the risk factors associated with death in patients over 70 years old (yo). Methods: : In this retrospective study, we enrolled patients over 70 yo with COVID-19 between January 20 and February 15, 2020. Epidemiological, demographic, and clinical data were collected. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression methods were used to explore the risk factors. Results: : A total of 147 patients were enrolled. The case-fatality rate was 28.6%. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression showed that clinical subtypes including the severe type (HR = 2.983, 95% CI: 1.231–7.226, P = 0.016) and the critical type (HR = 3.267, 95%CI: 1.009–10.576, P = 0.048) were associated with increasing risk of death when compared with the general type. Blood urea nitrogen greater than 9.5 mmol/L (HR = 2.805, 95% CI: 1.141–6.892, P = 0.025) on admission was an independent risk factor for death among laboratory findings. Conclusion: The patients over 70 yo with COVID-19 had a high case-fatality rate. The risk factors including clinical subtypes and blood urea nitrogen greater than 9.5 mmol/L could help physicians to identify elderly patients with poor clinical outcomes at an early stage.

5.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 821, 2021 Aug 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374104

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Elderly patients with COVID-19 were shown to have a high case-fatality rate. We aimed to explore the risk factors associated with death in patients over 70 years old (yr). METHODS: In this retrospective study, we enrolled consecutively hospitalized patients over 70 yr with COVID-19 between January 20 and February 15, 2020 in Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University. Epidemiological, demographic, and clinical data were collected. Clinical subtypes, including mild, moderate, severe, and critical types, were used to evaluate the severity of disease. Patients were classified into two groups: survivor and non-survivor groups. Clinical data were compared between the two groups. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression methods were used to explore the risk factors. RESULTS: A total of 147 patients were enrolled. The case-fatality rate was 28.6%. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression showed that clinical subtypes, including the severe type (HR = 2.983, 95% CI: 1.231-7.226, P = 0.016) and the critical type (HR = 3.267, 95%CI: 1.009-10.576, P = 0.048), were associated with increasing risk of death when compared with the general type. Blood urea nitrogen greater than 9.5 mmol/L (HR = 2.805, 95% CI: 1.141-6.892, P = 0.025) on admission was an independent risk factor for death among laboratory findings. CONCLUSION: The patients over 70 yr with COVID-19 had a high case-fatality rate. The risk factors, including clinical subtypes and blood urea nitrogen greater than 9.5 mmol/L, could help physicians to identify elderly patients with poor clinical outcomes at an early stage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/ethnology , China/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
6.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 821, 2021 Aug 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1357021

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Elderly patients with COVID-19 were shown to have a high case-fatality rate. We aimed to explore the risk factors associated with death in patients over 70 years old (yr). METHODS: In this retrospective study, we enrolled consecutively hospitalized patients over 70 yr with COVID-19 between January 20 and February 15, 2020 in Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University. Epidemiological, demographic, and clinical data were collected. Clinical subtypes, including mild, moderate, severe, and critical types, were used to evaluate the severity of disease. Patients were classified into two groups: survivor and non-survivor groups. Clinical data were compared between the two groups. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression methods were used to explore the risk factors. RESULTS: A total of 147 patients were enrolled. The case-fatality rate was 28.6%. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression showed that clinical subtypes, including the severe type (HR = 2.983, 95% CI: 1.231-7.226, P = 0.016) and the critical type (HR = 3.267, 95%CI: 1.009-10.576, P = 0.048), were associated with increasing risk of death when compared with the general type. Blood urea nitrogen greater than 9.5 mmol/L (HR = 2.805, 95% CI: 1.141-6.892, P = 0.025) on admission was an independent risk factor for death among laboratory findings. CONCLUSION: The patients over 70 yr with COVID-19 had a high case-fatality rate. The risk factors, including clinical subtypes and blood urea nitrogen greater than 9.5 mmol/L, could help physicians to identify elderly patients with poor clinical outcomes at an early stage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/ethnology , China/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 43(3): e438-e445, 2021 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1276215

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-sanctioned prevention strategies have included frequent handwashing with soap and water, covering the mouth and nose with a mask when around others, cleaning and disinfecting maintaining a distance of at least 6 feet from others, etc. Although many of these recommendations are based upon observation and past infection control practices, it is important to combine and explore public data sets to identify predictors of infection, morbidity and mortality to develop more finely honed interventions, based on sociodemographic factors. METHOD: Cross-sectional study of both states in the US and counties in NY state. RESULTS: Population density was found to be significantly associated with state-level coronavirus infection and mortality rate (b = 0.49, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.34, 0.64, P < .0001). States that have lower socioeconomic status, lower mean age and denser populations are associated with higher incidence rates. In regard to NY state, counties with a higher percentage of minority residents had higher COVID-19 mortality rates (b = 2.61, 95% CI: 0.36, 4.87, P = 0.023). Larger population cohorts were associated with lower COVID-19 mortality rates after adjusting for other variables in the model (b = -1.39, 95% CI: -2.07, -0.71, P < 0.001). Population density was not significantly associated with COVID-19 mortality rates after adjustment across counties in the NY state. Public ridership was not indicative of cases or mortality across states in the USA; however, it is a significant factor associated with incidence (but not mortality) in NY counties. CONCLUSION: Population density was the only significant predictor of mortality across states in the USA. Lower mean age, lower median household incomes and more densely populated states were at higher risk of COVID-19 infection. Population density was not found to be a significant independent variable compared to minority status and socioeconomic factors in the New York epicenter. Meanwhile, public ridership was found to be a significant factor associated with incidence in New York counties.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Incidence , Minority Groups , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
8.
J Diabetes ; 2021 Jan 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1112184

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Diabetes has been identified as a risk factor for intubation and mortality in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We seek to examine the impact of clinical variables such as glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) on mortality and need for intubation, as well as demographic variables such as age, sex, and race on persons with type 2 diabetes and COVID-19. METHODS: Analyses were conducted on 4413 patients with an International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) diagnosis of type 2 diabetes and COVID-19. Survival analysis was conducted using Kaplan-Meier curves and the log-rank test to compare subgroup analyses. RESULTS: In this multivariate analysis, male gender, older age, and hyperglycemia at admission were associated with increased mortality and intubation, but this was not seen for race, ethnicity, insurance type, or HbA1c. Based on Kaplan-Meier analysis, having comorbid conditions such as hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and coronary artery disease was associated with a statistically significant increased risk of mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Glycemic levels at admission have a greater impact on health outcomes than HbA1c. Older men and those with comorbid disease are also at greater risk for mortality. Further longitudinal studies need to be done to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on type 2 diabetes.

9.
Acta Veterinaria et Zootechnica Sinica ; 51(8):2027-2031, 2020.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-833202

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to investigate the infection of feline coronavirus (FCoV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in partial areas of China during the novel coronavirus outbreak. Nose swabs and rectal swabs were collected from cats presented with respiratory disease symptoms and gastrointestinal disease symptoms in pet hospitals of 14 cities in China. Total RNAs were extracted from the samples and then were transcribed to cDNA. The FCoV and SARS-CoV-2 were detected by the reported PCR methods. As a result, no SARS-CoV-2 case has been detected in 269 cats, while there were 35 cats infected with feline coronavirus. It was suggested that there was no case infected with SARS-CoV-2 in fourteen cities in China during novel coronavirus outbreak.

10.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-583

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 is an emerging infectious disease that first reported in China and has spread worldwide. We aimed to explore the clinical variables associa

11.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-513

ABSTRACT

Background: With the outbreak of COVID-19 from Wuhan, HubeProvince, China since January 2020, there is a tremendous pressure on medical resources. We studie

12.
International Journal of Mental Health Promotion ; 22(3):149-157, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-740644

ABSTRACT

The purpose of the study was to investigate the mental status and psychological needs of police officers during the COVID-19 outbreak in China. The Anti-Pandemic Public Mental Status Scale and self-administered Psychological Needs Scale were administered online to police officers in Y city, a significant sub-central city of Hubei Province, where was affected by the pandemic the most seriously. A total of 5,467 valid questionnaires were collected, of which female police accounted for 17.7%. Compared with the national public and Y city public data previously measured using the Anti-Pandemic Public Mental Status Scale, this study found that 24.6% of the Y city police suffered maladaptive problems. The mental status of the national public was the best, followed by the Y city police. The mental status of the Y city public was the worst. Moreover, there was a significant interaction between gender and unit type of Y city police (p = 0.02). The mental status of female police working in prisons was worse than their male counterparts (p = 0.01). Furthermore, psychological needs survey results showed that the police most wanted to learn the topics of self-adjustment and family relations. The most desired psychological assistances were relaxation and stress reduction, while the percentage of willingness to choose psychological counseling was low. During the pandemic, some police officers showed obvious psychological symptoms and the mental health services could be provided according to their psychological needs.

13.
J Cancer Res Ther ; 16(2): 350-355, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-455553

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global pandemic since its outbreak in December 2019, which posed a threat to the safety and well-being of people on a global scale. Cancer patients are at high risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, and their critical morbidity and case fatality rates are high. The ablation expert committee of the Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology compiled corresponding expert recommendations. These recommendations summarize the preventive measures and management of tumor ablation treatment in medical institutions, including outpatient clinics, oncology wards, ablation operation room, and postablation follow-ups in accordance with the guidelines and protocols imposed by the National Health Commission of the People's Republic of China and the experience in management and prevention according to various hospitals. This consensus aims to reduce and prevent the spread of SARS-CoV-2 and its cross-infection between cancer patients in hospitals and provide regulatory advice and guidelines for medical personnel.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Catheter Ablation/adverse effects , Catheter-Related Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks , Neoplasms/surgery , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , COVID-19 , Catheter-Related Infections/virology , China/epidemiology , Congresses as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasms/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Journal of Chinese Physician ; (12): E001-E001, 2020.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM (Western Pacific), WPRIM (Western Pacific) | ID: covidwho-6169

ABSTRACT

At present, the prevention and control of the COVID-19 is still severe, its pathogen SARS-CoV-2 is highly infectious and pathogenic, and the population is generally susceptible. In order to deal with the epidemic, selective operation can be postponed, but most of the patients with acute abdominal diseases are commonly in clinic, with acute onset and severe condition, and most of them are accompanied with fever and gastrointestinal symptoms, so emergency operation is needed.Under the condition of the current epidemic—COVID-19, it requires a higher standard to diagnose and treat patients with acute abdomen. The first step is to carry out procedures to identify whether the patient is infected or not. Those who are not infected can go through the normal treating procedures.For patients diagnosed with COVID-19 or suspected patients, the second step is to achieve classified diagnoses and treatments, and to adopt a treating plan that integrates TCM and western medicine.In order to protect patients and medical staff, the COVID-19 in hospital transmission must be avoided. For patients with COVID-19 who need emergency surgery, we must strictly comply with the hospital's protection regulations, closely coordinate the relevant departments of surgery, perform the three-level protection, operate in accordance with the principle of damage control in the negative pressure surgery room, and return to the isolation ward according to the prevention and control process after operation. For units without surgical conditions, patients should be transferred to hospital in time on the premise of maximum damage control, and patients must not be delayed for timely diagnosis and treatment due to the epidemic.

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