Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Med Klin Intensivmed Notfmed ; 2022 Jan 03.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603177

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers caring for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID­19) patients are at an increased risk for a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. The aim of this seroepidemiological study was to evaluate the risk of infection for employees at a tertiary care hospital. METHODS: Serological tests for antibodies against SARS-CoV­2 were carried out in a prospective cohort of employees directly involved in the care of COVID­19 patients every 2 weeks from March to July 2020 (1st wave). Antibody status was examined again between December 2020 and February 2021 (2nd wave). RESULTS: The seroprevalence of antibodies against SARS-CoV­2 was 5.1% at the end of the study in February 2021. The cumulative incidence was 3.9% after a median observation period of 261 days. CONCLUSION: We observed a low risk of SARS-CoV­2 infection comparable to that of the general population in the examined cohort of healthcare workers involved in the acute care of COVID­19 patients under the applied hygiene and protective measures.

2.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0260213, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526695

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Influenza is a major concern in hospitals, including the emergency department (ED), mainly because of a high risk for ED personnel to acquire and transmit the disease. Although influenza vaccination is recommended for health care workers, vaccination coverage is low. METHODS: This survey was conducted in the 2016/2017 and 2020/2021 influenza seasons. Questionnaires were sent to ED personnel in 12 hospitals in Bavaria, South-Eastern Germany. The response rates were 62% and 38% in 2016/2017 and 2020/2021, respectively. Data were compared between the two seasons as well as between vaccinated and not vaccinated respondents in 2020/2021. RESULTS: Significantly more ED personnel reported having been vaccinated in the 2020/2021 season. Factors associated with vaccination coverage (or the intention to get vaccinated) were profession (physician / medical student), having been vaccinated at least twice, the availability of an influenza vaccination on site (in the ED) as well as the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, significant differences in the assessment and evaluation of influenza, its vaccination side effects and ethical aspects were found between vaccinated and not vaccinated ED personnel in 2020/2021. Unvaccinated respondents estimated higher frequencies of almost all potential vaccination side effects, were less likely to accept lay-offs if employees would not come to work during an influenza pandemic and more likely to agree that work attendance should be an employee´s decision. Vaccinated participants instead, rather agreed that vaccination should be mandatory and were less likely to consider job changes in case of a mandatory vaccination policy. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic might have contributed to a higher influenza vaccination rate among ED workers. Vaccination on site and interventions targeting the perception of influenza vaccination and its side effects may be most promising to increase the vaccination coverage among ED personnel.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel/psychology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Germany , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Influenza Vaccines/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged
3.
Anaesthesist ; 70(7): 582-597, 2021 Jul.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453677

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: During the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic the government of the state of Bavaria, Germany, declared a state of emergency for its entire territory for the first time in history. Some areas in eastern Bavaria were among the most severely affected communities in Germany, prompting authorities and hospitals to build up capacities for a surge of COVID-19 patients. In some areas, intensive care unit (ICU) capacities were heavily engaged, which occasionally made a redistribution of patients necessary. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For managing COVID-19-related hospital capacities and patient allocation, crisis management squads in Bavaria were expanded by disaster task force medical officers ("Ärztlicher Leiter Führungsgruppe Katastrophenschutz" [MO]) with substantial executive authority. The authors report their experiences as MO concerning the superordinate patient allocation management in the district of Upper Palatinate (Oberpfalz) in eastern Bavaria. RESULTS: By abandoning routine patient care and building up additional ICU resources, surge capacity for the treatment of COVID-19 patients was generated in hospitals. In parts of the Oberpfalz, ICU capacities were almost entirely occupied by patients with corona virus infections, making reallocation to other hospitals within the district and beyond necessary. The MO managed patient pathways in an escalating manner by defining local (within the region of responsibility of a single MO), regional (within the district), and cross-regional (over district borders) reallocation lanes, as needed. When regional or cross-regional reallocation lanes had to be established, an additional management level located at the district government was involved. Within the determined reallocation lanes, emitting and receiving hospitals mutually agreed on any patient transfer without explicitly involving the MO, thereby maintaining the established interhospital routine transfer procedures. The number of patients and available treatment resources at each hospital were monitored with the help of a web-based treatment capacity registry. If indicated, reallocation lanes were dynamically revised according to the present situation. To oppose further virus spreading in nursing homes, the state government prohibited patient allocation to these facilities, which led to considerably longer hospital length of stay of convalescent elderly and/or dependent patients. In parallel to the flattening of the COVID-19 incidence curve, routine hospital patient care could be re-established in a stepwise manner. CONCLUSION: Patient allocation during the state of emergency by the MO sought to keep up routine interhospital reallocation procedures as much as possible, thereby reducing management time and effort. Occasionally, difficulties were observed during patient allocations crossing district borders, if other MO followed different management principles. The nursing home blockade and conflicting financial interests of hospitals posed challenges to the work of the disaster task force medical officers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Decision Making, Organizational , Pandemics , Surge Capacity/organization & administration , Critical Care , Disease Management , Emergency Service, Hospital , Germany , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay , Nursing Homes , Patient Transfer , Research Report , Resource Allocation
4.
J Nephrol ; 34(4): 1007-1018, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263196

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The aim of the current study was to evaluate whether tubular markers kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and N-acetyl-ß-glucosaminidase (NAG) are related to acute kidney injury (AKI) and severe disease in patients with COVID-19. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this prospective observational clinical trial we examined a cohort of 80 patients with proof of acute respiratory infection and divided them into a COVID-19 cohort (n = 54) and a control cohort (n = 26). KIM-1 and NAG were measured from urine samples collected in the emergency department. We assessed the development of AKI, admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and intrahospital death as clinical endpoints. Urinary KIM-1 and NAG were not significantly different between patients with SARS-CoV-2 and those with other respiratory infections (each p = n.s.). Eight patients from the COVID-19 cohort and five of the non-COVID-19-patients suffered from acute kidney injury during their stay. Nine COVID-19 patients and two non-COVID-19 patients were admitted to the ICU. KIM-1 was significantly elevated in COVID-19 patients with, compared to those without AKI (p = 0.005), as opposed to NAG and creatinine (each p = n.s.). Furthermore, KIM-1 was significantly elevated in the patients with COVID-19 that had to be transferred to the ICU (p = 0.015), in contrast to NAG and creatinine (each p = n.s.). CONCLUSION: Assessing KIM-1 in patients with COVID-19 might provide additional value in recognizing AKI at an early stage of disease. Further, KIM-1 might indicate higher risk for clinical deterioration as displayed by admission to the ICU.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Biomarkers , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 1 , Humans , Kidney , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Unfallchirurg ; 124(5): 343-351, 2021 May.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217426

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The corona crisis of 2020 posed previously unknown challenges to hospitals providing acute care. In addition to the treatment of COVID-19 patients, universities and other acute care hospitals had to provide emergency medical care, including for patients undergoing trauma surgery. The challenge was that no reliable planning figures were available regarding the expected volume for such a crisis situation and therefore no reliable resource planning was possible in this respect. Therefore, the aim of this work was to record the incidence of polytrauma and other injuries during the pandemic crisis in a university trauma surgery clinic and to compare it with the years 2017-2019. METHODS: In this single-center study, a retrospective analysis of the injury incidence during calendar weeks with existing exit restrictions (12th-19th week) for the year 2020 for trauma surgery patients of a university hospital was performed. At first, the treatment of COVID-19 patients was recorded daily in order to objectify the burden and expenditure of inpatient treatment for these patients. Then, for the evaluation period from 20.03.2020 to 06.05.2020, the numbers of 1. polytrauma, 2. work-related accidents and 3. leisure-related trauma patients were recorded and compared with the numbers from 2017-2019 during the same period. RESULTS: In total, 118 patients were treated with COVID-19 as inpatients during the period under study, of which up to 43 patients had to be treated simultaneously in intensive care on 1 day. Overall, the number of polytrauma, work-related accidents and leisure-time accident patients was lower in 2020 than in the previous years. Nevertheless, with a decline of only -28% (22 ± 4.9 vs. 16), a considerable number of polytrauma patients were recorded, while all work-related accidents (44%, 304 ± 31.3 vs. 170) and also leisure-time accidents (39%, 173 ± 22.7 vs. 106) considerably decreased. In the group of leisure-time accidents, there was initially a remarkable decline in the number of cases per week after the initial restrictions began, but as the duration of the restrictions increased, the number per week has risen to the level of previous years. DISCUSSION: Even in exceptional situations such as the corona pandemic, there were a significant number of patients in need of acute treatment, especially polytrauma patients. This should be considered in the future in the event of similar exceptional situations in the inpatient care framework when providing trauma surgery care capacities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Hospitals, University , Humans , Incidence , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
ESC Heart Fail ; 8(1): 309-316, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064347

ABSTRACT

AIMS: We aimed to assess whether expression of whole-blood RNA of sodium proton exchanger 1 (NHE1) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is associated with COVID-19 infection and outcome in patients presenting to the emergency department with respiratory infections. Furthermore, we investigated NHE1 and GLUT1 expression in the myocardium of deceased COVID-19 patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Whole-blood quantitative assessment of NHE1 and GLUT1 RNA was performed using quantitative PCR in patients with respiratory infection upon first contact in the emergency department and subsequently stratified by SARS-CoV-2 infection status. Assessment of NHE1 and GLUT1 RNA using PCR was also performed in left ventricular myocardium of deceased COVID-19 patients. NHE1 expression is up-regulated in whole blood of patients with COVID-19 compared with other respiratory infections at first medical contact in the emergency department (control: 0.0021 ± 0.0002, COVID-19: 0.0031 ± 0.0003, P = 0.01). The ratio of GLUT1 to NHE1 is significantly decreased in the blood of COVID-19 patients who are subsequently intubated and/or die (severe disease) compared with patients with moderate disease (moderate disease: 0.497 ± 0.083 vs. severe disease: 0.294 ± 0.0336, P = 0.036). This ratio is even further decreased in the myocardium of patients who deceased from COVID-19 in comparison with the myocardium of non-infected donors. CONCLUSIONS: NHE1 and GLUT1 may be critically involved in the disease progression of SARS-CoV-2 infection. We show here that SARS-CoV-2 infection critically disturbs ion channel expression in the heart. A decreased ratio of GLUT1/NHE1 could potentially serve as a biomarker for disease severity in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Glucose Transporter Type 1/blood , Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger 1/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Case-Control Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Glucose Transporter Type 1/metabolism , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Predictive Value of Tests , Prospective Studies , RNA, Messenger/blood , Severity of Illness Index , Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger 1/metabolism
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL