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1.
Clin Lab ; 68(1)2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622821

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since December 2019, there has been a global outbreak of COVID-19. As of the end of July 2020, more than 600,000 deaths had been reported globally. The purpose of this paper is to further explore the application of non-invasive ventilation in severe COVID-19 patients. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted to included 57 confirmed COVID-19 patients, among which 36 cases were severe. According to different oxygen inhalation methods, they were divided into non-invasive ventilator assisted ventilation group with 21 cases (group A) and 15 cases of nasal catheter oxygen inhalation group (group B). The data of respiration (RR), heart rate (HR), partial arterial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), partial arterial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2), and oxygenation index (OI) before the treatment of noninvasive ventilator assisted ventilation or nasal catheter oxygen treatment at 24, 48, and 72 hours of treatment of the 2 groups were collected and analyzed to determine whether the above indicators were statistically different in each time period. RESULTS: After 24 hours of treatment with noninvasive ventilator assisted ventilation in group A, RR gradually decreased, PaO2 and OI were significantly higher than before treatment, while after 24 hours of treatment, PaO2, RR, HR and other indexes in group B showed no significant improvement, and OI increased gradually after 48 hours of treatment, with statistically significant difference compared with that before treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Early adoption of non-invasive ventilation can effectively improve the hypoxic state of patients with severe COVID-19. The combination of underlying diseases will not prolong the use of non-invasive ventilation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventilators, Mechanical
2.
J Clin Lab Anal ; 35(12): e24100, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1508785

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to explore clinical indexes for management of severe/critically ill patients with COVID-19, influenza A H7N9, and H1N1 pneumonia by comparing hematological and radiological characteristics. METHODS: Severe/critically ill patients with COVID-19, H7N9, and H1N1 pneumonia were retrospectively enrolled. The demographic data, clinical manifestations, hematological parameters, and radiological characteristics were compared. RESULTS: In this study, 16 cases of COVID-19, 10 cases of H7N9, and 13 cases of H1N1 who met severe/critically ill criteria were included. Compared with COVID-19, H7N9 and H1N1 groups had more chronic diseases (80% and 92.3% vs. 25%, p < 0.05), higher APACHE Ⅱ scores (16.00 ± 8.63 and 15.08 ± 6.24, vs. 5.50 ± 2.58, p < 0.05), higher mortality rates (40% and 46.2% vs. 0%, p < 0.05), significant lymphocytopenia (0.59 ± 0.31 × 109 /L and 0.56 ± 0.35 × 109 /L vs. 0.97 ± 0.33 × 109 /L, p < 0.05), and elevated neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR; 14.67 ± 6.10 and 14.64 ± 10.36 vs. 6.29 ± 3.72, p < 0.05). Compared with the H7N9 group, ground-glass opacity (GGO) on chest CT was common in the COVID-19 group (p = 0.028), while pleural effusion was rare (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The NLR can be used as a clinical parameter for the predication of risk stratification and outcome in COVID-19 and influenza A pneumonia. Manifestations of pleural effusion or GGO in chest CT may be helpful for the identification of different viral pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Influenza, Human/blood , Influenza, Human/diagnostic imaging , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Cell Count , COVID-19/etiology , Chronic Disease , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype , Influenza, Human/etiology , Influenza, Human/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , Sex Factors
3.
Sustainability ; 13(20):11520, 2021.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1470986

ABSTRACT

This study explored the remote teaching experiences of a group of English for academic purposes teachers during the COVID-19 pandemic, focusing on what was learned from the transition to identify which practices are worth keeping and which should be abandoned as well as how English for academic purposes practitioners can move from emergency to sustainability. In this qualitative, interpretive study, a total of 15 teachers participated in semi-structured interviews investigating their experiences, challenges, and opportunities teaching English for academic purposes during emergency remote teaching and their opinions on how this information could be leveraged to develop sustainable English-for-academic-purposes technology practices. The results indicated that the teachers understood the necessity of emergency remote teaching, were aware of their role in their students’ academic success, and believed in the importance of integrating technology into language teaching and learning. They also adopted various strategies for online English-for-academic-purposes delivery. It is suggested that effective professional development for English-for-academic-purposes teachers consider what teachers believe they need, the shifting educational landscape, and how to inculcate pedagogical practices that will enrich the language classroom by using technology in language teaching and learning. They also adopted various strategies for online English for academic purposes delivery. It is suggested that effective professional development for English for academic purposes teachers must consider what teachers believe they need, the shifting educational landscape, and how to inculcate pedagogical practices that will enrich the language classroom.

4.
Sustainability ; 13(13):7111, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1304715

ABSTRACT

This study explored emotions and self-regulatory learning in postgraduate students, forced to transition to emergency remote teaching, at a Hong Kong university after the start of the academic semester. Self-regulation is a critical factor for successful online learning, and emotions are important antecedents of self-regulated learning. The study adopted a two-phase research design, with an initial online questionnaire (n = 52) followed by semi-structured interviews (n = 16) to gain a rich and holistic understanding of students’ experiences. Our findings indicate that: (1) locating a suitable location to attend online classes and sharing problems with classmates were the two most frequently self-regulatory learning strategies employed by students;(2) students experienced some enjoyment attending online classes but experienced increased pressure and time commitment to complete assigned work;(3) students found online learning to lack a sense of community, making it challenging to interact with classmates. The findings suggest teachers need to incorporate various synchronous and asynchronous collaborative activities, and they need to increase their own and students’ presence online to motivate and facilitate effective teaching and learning.

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