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1.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; : 2102329, 2022 Aug 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1984960

ABSTRACT

Patients with cancer are considered at high risk of COVID-19 related complications with higher mortality rates than healthy individuals. This study investigated the perception, acceptance, and influencing factors of COVID-19 vaccination among cancer patients in Guangzhou, China. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Guangzhou, China from August to November 2021 in two tertiary medical centers. Outpatients were recruited through hospital posters to complete a questionnaire including demographics, medical history, knowledge, and attitude toward COVID-19 vaccines and COVID-19 vaccination status. Chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression were used to analyze predictors for acceptance of COVID-19 vaccination. In total, only 75 out of 343 patients (21.87%) had received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine. Twenty-one patients (6.12%) had received a recommendation about COVID-19 vaccination from their physicians. Patients who were recommended by physicians to get vaccinated (aOR = 11.71 95% CI: 2.71-50.66), with a monthly income of more than CNY 5000 (aOR = 3.94, 95% CI: 1.88-8.26) were more likely to have received COVID-19 vaccination. Cancer patients who had been diagnosed for more than one year (aOR = 0.21, 95% CI: 0.09-0.51), had received multiple cancer treatment strategies (aOR = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.16-0.74), worried about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines (aOR = 0.21, 95% CI: 0.11-0.40), were less likely to have received COVID-19 vaccination. COVID-19 vaccination uptake among cancer patients was insufficient. The proportion of cancer patients receiving vaccination recommendations from physicians remains inadequate. Physicians are expected to play an essential role in patients' knowledge of the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines.

2.
Lancet Reg Health West Pac ; 29: 100569, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1977617

ABSTRACT

Background: China implemented strict non-pharmaceutical interventions to contain COVID-19 at the early stage. We aimed to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on HIV care continuum in China. Methods: Aggregated data on HIV care continuum between 1 January 2017 and 31 December 2020 were collected from centers for disease control and prevention at different levels and major infectious disease hospitals in various regions in China. We used interrupted time series analysis to characterize temporal trend in weekly numbers of HIV post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) prescriptions, HIV tests, HIV diagnoses, median time intervals between HIV diagnosis and antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation (time intervals, days), ART initiations, mean CD4+ T cell counts at ART initiation (CD4 counts, cells/µL), ART collections, and missed visits for ART collection, before and after the implementation of massive NPIs (23 January to 7 April 2020). We used Poisson segmented regression models to estimate the immediate and long-term impact of NPIs on these outcomes. Findings: A total of 16,780 PEP prescriptions, 1,101,686 HIV tests, 69,659 HIV diagnoses, 63,409 time intervals and ART initiations, 61,518 CD4 counts, 1,528,802 ART collections, and 6656 missed visits were recorded during the study period. The majority of outcomes occurred in males (55·3-87·4%), 21-50 year olds (51·7-90·5%), Southwestern China (38·2-82·0%) and heterosexual transmission (47·9-66·1%). NPIs was associated with 71·5% decrease in PEP prescriptions (IRR 0·285; 95% CI 0·192-0·423), 36·1% decrease in HIV tests (0·639, 0·497-0·822), 32·0% decrease in HIV diagnoses (0·680, 0·511-0·904), 59·3% increase in time intervals (1·593, 1·270-1·997) and 17·4% decrease in CD4 counts (0·826, 0·746-0·915) in the first week during NPIs. There was no marked change in the number of ART initiations, ART collections and missed visits during the NPIs. By the end of 2020, the number of HIV tests, HIV diagnoses, time intervals, ART initiations, and CD4 counts reached expected levels, but the number of PEP prescriptions (0·523, 0·394-0·696), ART collections (0·720, 0·595-0·872), and missed visits (0·137, 0·086-0·220) were still below expected levels. With the ease of restrictions, PEP prescriptions (slope change 1·024/week, 1·012-1·037), HIV tests (1·016/week, 1·008-1·026), and CD4 counts (1·005/week, 1·001-1·009) showed a significant increasing trend. Interpretation: HIV care continuum in China was affected by the COVID-19 NPIs at various levels. Preparedness and efforts to maintain the HIV care continuum during public health emergencies should leverage collaborations between stakeholders. Funding: Natural Science Foundation of China.

3.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 90(4): 408-417, 2022 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1909062

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The effect of the COVID-19 epidemic on HIV self-testing (HIVST) remains unclear. We aimed to quantify the impact of COVID restrictions on HIVST kit purchasing behaviors in mainland China. METHODS: Deidentified transaction data were retrieved from a large online shopping platform. An interrupted time series model was constructed to examine the impact of COVID restrictions on the weekly number of anonymous customers purchasing HIVST kits, online orders, and purchased kits. RESULTS: A total of 2.32 million individuals submitted 4.46 million orders for 4.84 million HIVST kits between January 7, 2016, and April 22, 2020. Compared with expected levels, assuming COVID-19 epidemic and related restrictions had not happened, the number of purchasers, orders, and kits decreased by an estimated 10,500 (51.7%), 18,000 (55.3%), and 18,500 (54.9%) in the first week (January 23, 2020, to January 29, 2020) after COVID restrictions were implemented, respectively. As restrictions eased, the number of purchasers, orders, and kits increased by an average of 7.4%, 4.8%, and 4.9% per week, respectively. In the first week after COVID restrictions were lifted (April 9, 2020, to April 15, 2020), the number of purchasers returned to expected levels, whereas the number of orders and kits were still lower than expected levels. The impact of COVID restrictions on outcomes at the beginning of COVID restrictions and the increasing trends of outcomes were larger among those living in regions with higher COVID-19 incidence (eg, Wuhan city and Hubei province). CONCLUSIONS: Online sales of HIVST kits were significantly impacted by COVID restrictions, and HIVST kit purchasing patterns returned to expected levels after restrictions were lifted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , COVID-19/epidemiology , Commerce , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , HIV Testing , Humans , Mass Screening , Self-Testing
4.
J Med Virol ; 94(8): 3722-3730, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1888725

ABSTRACT

To mitigate SARS-CoV-2 transmission, vaccines have been urgently approved. With their limited availability, it is critical to distribute the vaccines reasonably. We simulated the SARS-CoV-2 transmission for 365 days over four intervention periods: free transmission, structural mitigation, personal mitigation, and vaccination. Sensitivity analyses were performed to obtain robust results. We further evaluated two proposed vaccination allocations, including one-dose-high-coverage and two-doses-low-coverage, when the supply was low. 33.35% (infection rate, 2.68 in 10 million people) and 40.54% (2.36) of confirmed cases could be avoided as the nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) adherence rate rose from 50% to 70%. As the vaccination coverage reached 60% and 80%, the total infections could be reduced by 32.72% and 41.19%, compared to the number without vaccination. When the durations of immunity were 90 and 120 days, the infection rates were 2.67 and 2.38. As the asymptomatic infection rate rose from 30% to 50%, the infection rate increased 0.92 (SD, 0.16) times. Conditioned on 70% adherence rate, with the same amount of limited available vaccines, the 20% and 40% vaccination coverage of one-dose-high-coverage, the infection rates were 2.70 and 2.35; corresponding to the two-doses-low-coverage with 10% and 20% vaccination coverage, the infection rates were 3.22 and 2.92. Our results indicated as the duration of immunity prolonged, the second wave of SARS-CoV-2 would be delayed and the scale would be declined. On average, the total infections in two-doses-low-coverage was 1.48 times (SD, 0.24) as high as that in one-dose-high-coverage. It is crucial to encourage people in order to improve vaccination coverage and establish immune barriers. Particularly when the supply is limited, a wiser strategy to prevent SARS-CoV-2 is equally distributing doses to the same number of individuals. Besides vaccination, NPIs are equally critical to the prevention of widespread of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Models, Theoretical , Vaccination
5.
European Journal of Psychotraumatology ; 13(1), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1782284

ABSTRACT

Background Pre-hospitalisation, hospitalisation and post-hospitalisation factors may significantly affect depression, anxiety and post-traumatic growth (PTG) among COVID-19 survivors. Objective Our study investigated depression, anxiety and PTG and their correlates among COVID-19 survivors. Method A cross-sectional telephone survey recruited 199 COVID-19 patients (Mean age = 42.7;53.3% females) at six-month follow-up after hospital discharge in five Chinese cities (i.e. Wuhan, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, Dongguan and Nanning). Their demographic information, clinical records and experiences during (e.g. severity of covid-19 symptoms, treatment and exposure to other patients’ suffering) and after hospitalisation (e.g. perceived impact of covid-19, somatic symptoms after hospitalisation), and psychosocial factors (e.g. perceived discrimination, self-stigma, affiliate stigma, resilience and social support) were investigated. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD-7) scale, respectively. PTG was examined by the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) instrument. Results The proportion of depressive symptoms <5, ≥5 and <10, ≥10 were 76.9%, 12.0% and 11.1%, respectively. The proportion of anxiety symptoms <5, ≥5 and <10, ≥10 were 77.4%, 15.1% and 7.5%, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression showed that receiving mental health care services during hospitalisation, somatic symptoms after discharge, perceived affiliate stigma and perceived impact of being infected with COVID-19 were significantly and positively associated with probable depression. Significant correlates of probable anxiety also included permanent residents of the city, somatic symptoms after discharge, perceived impact of being infected with COVID-19 and self-stigma. Social support, self-stigma and receiving mental health care services during hospitalisation were positively associated with PTG. Conclusions: The results suggest that post-hospitalisation and psychosocial factors had relatively stronger associations with depression, anxiety and PTG than pre-hospitalisation and hospitalisation factors. Promoting social support and social inclusion may be useful strategies to improve the mental health of COVID-19 survivors. HIGHLIGHTS • Post-hospitalisation and psychosocial factors had relatively stronger associations with depression, anxiety and PTG than pre-hospitalisation and hospitalisation factors, promoting social support and social inclusion may be useful strategies to improve mental health of COVID-19 survivors.

6.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 13(1): 2055294, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774261

ABSTRACT

Background: Pre-hospitalisation, hospitalisation and post-hospitalisation factors may significantly affect depression, anxiety and post-traumatic growth (PTG) among COVID-19 survivors. Objective: Our study investigated depression, anxiety and PTG and their correlates among COVID-19 survivors. Method: A cross-sectional telephone survey recruited 199 COVID-19 patients (Mean age = 42.7; 53.3% females) at six-month follow-up after hospital discharge in five Chinese cities (i.e. Wuhan, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, Dongguan and Nanning). Their demographic information, clinical records and experiences during (e.g. severity of covid-19 symptoms, treatment and exposure to other patients' suffering) and after hospitalisation (e.g. perceived impact of covid-19, somatic symptoms after hospitalisation), and psychosocial factors (e.g. perceived discrimination, self-stigma, affiliate stigma, resilience and social support) were investigated. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD-7) scale, respectively. PTG was examined by the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) instrument. Results: The proportion of depressive symptoms <5, ≥5 and <10, ≥10 were 76.9%, 12.0% and 11.1%, respectively. The proportion of anxiety symptoms <5, ≥5 and <10, ≥10 were 77.4%, 15.1% and 7.5%, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression showed that receiving mental health care services during hospitalisation, somatic symptoms after discharge, perceived affiliate stigma and perceived impact of being infected with COVID-19 were significantly and positively associated with probable depression. Significant correlates of probable anxiety also included permanent residents of the city, somatic symptoms after discharge, perceived impact of being infected with COVID-19 and self-stigma. Social support, self-stigma and receiving mental health care services during hospitalisation were positively associated with PTG.Conclusions: The results suggest that post-hospitalisation and psychosocial factors had relatively stronger associations with depression, anxiety and PTG than pre-hospitalisation and hospitalisation factors. Promoting social support and social inclusion may be useful strategies to improve the mental health of COVID-19 survivors. HIGHLIGHTS: • Post-hospitalisation and psychosocial factors had relatively stronger associations with depression, anxiety and PTG than pre-hospitalisation and hospitalisation factors, promoting social support and social inclusion may be useful strategies to improve mental health of COVID-19 survivors.


Antecedentes: Los factores pre-hospitalización, durante la hospitalización y post-hospitalización pueden afectar significativamente la depresión, la ansiedad y el crecimiento postraumático (CPT) en los sobrevivientes de COVID-19.Objetivo: Nuestro estudio investigó la depresión, la ansiedad y el CPT y sus correlatos en sobrevivientes de COVID-19.Método: Una encuesta telefónica transversal reclutó a 199 pacientes con COVID-19 (edad promedio = 42,7; 53,3% mujeres) a los seis meses de seguimiento después del alta hospitalaria en cinco ciudades chinas (Wuhan, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, Dongguan y Nanning). Su información demográfica, registros clínicos y experiencias durante la hospitalización (e.g. gravedad de los síntomas de COVID-19, tratamiento, exposición al sufrimiento de otros pacientes) y después de la hospitalización (e.g. impacto percibido de COVID-19, síntomas somáticos después de la hospitalización) y factores psicosociales (e.g. discriminación percibida, autoestigma, estigma de afiliación, resiliencia, apoyo social) fueron investigados. Los síntomas depresivos y de ansiedad se midieron mediante el Cuestionario de Salud del Paciente (PHQ-9 en su sigla en inglés) y la escala de trastorno de ansiedad generalizada (GAD-7 en su sigla en inglés) respectivamente, el CPT se examinó mediante el instrumento Inventario de Crecimiento Postraumático (PTGI en su sigla en inglés).Resultados: La proporción de síntomas depresivos <5, ≥5 y <10, y ≥10 fue 76,9%, 12,0% y 11,1% respectivamente. La proporción de síntomas de ansiedad <5, ≥5 y <10, y ≥10 fue del 77,4%, 15,1% y 7,5% respectivamente. La regresión logística multivariante mostró que recibir servicios de atención de salud mental durante la hospitalización, los síntomas somáticos después del alta, el estigma de afiliación percibido y el impacto percibido de estar infectado con COVID-19 se asociaron significativa y positivamente con una probable depresión. Los correlatos significativos de ansiedad probable también incluyeron ser residente permanente de la ciudad, síntomas somáticos después del alta, impacto percibido de estar infectado con COVID-19 y autoestigma. El apoyo social, el autoestigma y recibir servicios de salud mental durante la hospitalización se asociaron positivamente con el CPT.Conclusiones: Los resultados sugieren que los factores psicosociales y posteriores a la hospitalización tuvieron asociaciones relativamente más fuertes con la depresión, la ansiedad y el CPT que los factores previos a la hospitalización y hospitalización. Promover el apoyo social y la inclusión social pueden ser estrategias útiles para mejorar la salud mental de los sobrevivientes de COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medically Unexplained Symptoms , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Patient Discharge , Survivors
7.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 13(1): 2019980, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1665830

ABSTRACT

Background: As a highly infectious disease with human-to-human transmission characteristics, COVID-19 has caused panic in the general public. Those who have recovered from COVID-19 may experience discrimination and internalized stigma. They may be more likely to worry about social interaction and develop social anxiety. Objectives: This study investigated the associations among hospitalization factors, social/interpersonal factors, personal factors, and social anxiety to reveal the mechanism of social anxiety in COVID-19 survivors. Methods: A cross-sectional, multicenter telephone survey was conducted from July to September 2020 in five Chinese cities (i.e. Wuhan, Nanning, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, and Dongguan); adult COVID-19 survivors were recruited 6 months after they were discharged from the hospital. Linear regressions and path analysis based on the minority stress model were conducted to test the relationships among hospitalization, social/interpersonal factors, personal factors, and social anxiety. Results: The response rate was 74.5% (N = 199, 55.3% females). Linear regression analyses showed that various hospitalization, social/interpersonal, and personal factors were statistically significantly associated with social anxiety. Path analysis showed that the proposed model fit the data well (χ2(df) = 3.196(3), p = .362, CFI = .999, NNFI = .996, RMSEA = .018). Internalized stigma fully mediated the association between perceived discrimination/social support and social anxiety, while it partially mediated the association between perceived affiliate stigma and social anxiety. Conclusions: The results suggest that social/interpersonal and personal factors have a stronger association with social anxiety than hospitalization factors and highlight the importance of internalized stigma in understanding the mechanisms of these relationships. Clinical psychologists can refer to these modifiable psychosocial factors to develop efficient interventions for mental health promotion.


Antecedentes: Como una enfermedad altamente infecciosa con características de transmisión de persona a persona, el COVID-19 ha causado pánico en el público en general. Aquellos que se han recuperado del COVID-19 pueden experimentar discriminación y estigma internalizado. Es más probable que se preocupen por la interacción social y desarrollen ansiedad social.Objetivos: Este estudio investigó las asociaciones entre factores de hospitalización, factores sociales /interpersonales, factores personales y ansiedad social para revelar el mecanismo de ansiedad social en sobrevivientes de COVID-19.Métodos: Se realizó una encuesta telefónica transversal multicentro de julio a septiembre de 2020 en cinco ciudades chinas (es decir, Wuhan, Nanning, Shenzhen, Zhuhai y Dongguan). Se reclutaron sobrevivientes adultos de COVID-19 seis meses después de ser dados de alta del hospital. Se realizaron regresiones lineales y análisis de ruta basados en el modelo de estrés de minoría para probar las relaciones entre la hospitalización, los factores sociales/interpersonales, los factores personales y la ansiedad social.Resultados: La tasa de respuesta fue del 74,5% (N = 199, 55,3% mujeres). Los análisis de regresión lineal mostraron que varios factores de hospitalización, sociales/interpersonales y personales se asociaron de manera estadísticamente significativa con la ansiedad social. El análisis de ruta mostró que el modelo propuesto se ajustaba bien a los datos (χ 2 (df) = 3.196 (3), p = .362, CFI = .999, NNFI = .996, RMSEA = .018). El estigma internalizado medió completamente la asociación entre discriminación/apoyo social percibido y ansiedad social, mientras que medió parcialmente la asociación entre el estigma percibido de afiliados y ansiedad social.Conclusiones: Los resultados sugieren que los factores sociales/interpersonales y personales tienen una asociación más fuerte con la ansiedad social que los factores de hospitalización y resaltan la importancia del estigma internalizado en la comprensión de los mecanismos de estas relaciones. Los psicólogos clínicos pueden referirse a estos factores psicosociales modificables para desarrollar intervenciones eficientes para la promoción de la salud mental.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Hospitalization , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fear , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Stigma , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires , Survivors , Young Adult
8.
European Journal of Psychotraumatology ; 13(1), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1661180

ABSTRACT

Background As a highly infectious disease with human-to-human transmission characteristics, COVID-19 has caused panic in the general public. Those who have recovered from COVID-19 may experience discrimination and internalized stigma. They may be more likely to worry about social interaction and develop social anxiety. Objectives This study investigated the associations among hospitalization factors, social/interpersonal factors, personal factors, and social anxiety to reveal the mechanism of social anxiety in COVID-19 survivors. Methods A cross-sectional, multicenter telephone survey was conducted from July to September 2020 in five Chinese cities (i.e. Wuhan, Nanning, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, and Dongguan);adult COVID-19 survivors were recruited 6 months after they were discharged from the hospital. Linear regressions and path analysis based on the minority stress model were conducted to test the relationships among hospitalization, social/interpersonal factors, personal factors, and social anxiety. Results The response rate was 74.5% (N = 199, 55.3% females). Linear regression analyses showed that various hospitalization, social/interpersonal, and personal factors were statistically significantly associated with social anxiety. Path analysis showed that the proposed model fit the data well (χ2(df) = 3.196(3), p = .362, CFI = .999, NNFI = .996, RMSEA = .018). Internalized stigma fully mediated the association between perceived discrimination/social support and social anxiety, while it partially mediated the association between perceived affiliate stigma and social anxiety. Conclusions The results suggest that social/interpersonal and personal factors have a stronger association with social anxiety than hospitalization factors and highlight the importance of internalized stigma in understanding the mechanisms of these relationships. Clinical psychologists can refer to these modifiable psychosocial factors to develop efficient interventions for mental health promotion. HIGHLIGHTS Internalized stigma fully mediated the effects of perceived discrimination and social support on social anxiety and partially mediated the effect of perceived affiliate stigma on social anxiety.

9.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 773106, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643547

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 survivors who had acute respiratory symptoms might experience prolonged post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to further rehabilitation, somatic symptoms and related distress. The conservation of resource (COR) theory is a well-developed theory to understand how people develop PTSD symptoms in traumatic events. The current study aimed to examine the potential factors of PTSD symptoms and interrelationships among this factors among COVID-19 survivors based on the COR theory. This cross-sectional telephone survey enrolled 199 COVID-19 patients (Mean age = 42.7; 53.3% females) 6 months after their hospital discharge in five Chinese cities (i.e., Wuhan, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, Dongguan, and Nanning). The results showed that 7% of participants were classified as having probable PTSD. The significant potential factors relating to PTSD symptoms included socio-demographic status, hospitalization experiences, post-hospitalization experiences, and psychological status. Besides, the proposed statistical mediation model based on the COR framework showed good model fit, χ2(df) = 17.286 (5), p = 0.004, CFI = 0.962, NNFI = 0.951, RMSEA = 0.077. Perceived resource loss/gain fully mediated the association between exposure to other patients' suffering during hospitalization and PTSD symptoms, and partially mediated the relationships from somatic symptoms/perceived impact of being infected with COVID-19 after discharge to PTSD symptoms. On the other hand, resilience was a full mediator in the relationship from ICU experience to PTSD symptoms and a partial mediator in the relationship from perceived impact to PTSD symptoms. The results provide preliminary support on applying the COR theory to understand the factors of PTSD symptoms among COVID-19 survivors. Interventions to reduce PTSD symptoms in this population can be developed based on the modifiable psychosocial mediators.

11.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 17(12): 4971-4981, 2021 12 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565874

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Men who have sex with men (MSM), a population bearing the greatest HIV burden in many countries, may also be vulnerable to COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccines are essential to containing the pandemic. However, vaccine hesitancy may compromise vaccine coverage. We aimed to understand the uptake of COVID-19 vaccine and factors associated with COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among HIV-infected MSM in mainland China. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey among HIV-infected MSM was conducted between 13 and 21 February 2021 in mainland China. Variables including demographics, mental health status, HIV characteristics, and knowledge of and attitudes toward COVID-19 pandemic and COVID-19 vaccine were collected. Chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression were used to analyze factors associated with COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. RESULTS: A total of 1295 participants were included. The median age was 29.3 years (interquartile range [IQR] 25.2-34.0 years). The uptake of COVID-19 vaccine was 8.7%. Two main reasons for receiving vaccines were "regarded vaccination as self-health protection" (67.3%) and "trust in domestic medical technology" (67.3%). Among participants who did not initiate vaccination, concern about side effects (46.4%) and disclosure of HIV infection (38.6%) were top two reasons, and 47.2% had higher vaccine hesitancy. Men who had with high antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.35-0.80), often (0.26, 0.17-0.40) or sometimes (0.46, 0.31-0.67) paid attention to information about the COVID-19 vaccine, preferred domestic vaccines (0.37, 0.24-0.59), thought the pandemic had moderate (0.58, 0.38-0.90) and moderately severe or severe impact (0.54, 0.38-0.78) on immunity, who were waiting for vaccination programs organized at workplace (0.60, 0.44-0.81) and who were unaware of where to get COVID-19 vaccine (0.61, 0.45-0.82) had lower degree of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. Men who were concerned about the efficacy (1.72, 1.16-2.54) and side effects (2.44, 1.78-3.35) had higher degree of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 vaccine uptake among HIV-infected MSM is still suboptimal. Understanding influencing factors of vaccine hesitancy among this group and making tailored measures to alleviate hesitancy would help improve the coverage of COVID-19 vaccination in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
12.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 17(12): 4964-4970, 2021 12 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565873

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to ravage the world. People living with HIV (PLHIV) are one of the most vulnerable groups. This study aims to identify the factors associated with the uptake and adverse reactions of COVID-19 vaccination. METHODS: We recruited PLHIV in China by convenience sampling between 7 and 23 February 2021. Participants were asked to complete an online questionnaire. Chi-squared test and multivariable logistic regression were used to assess factors associated with vaccine uptake. RESULTS: A total of 527 vaccinated and 1091 unvaccinated PLHIV were recruited. Individuals who had a higher education, engaged in occupations with a higher risk of COVID-19 infection, received influenza or pneumonia vaccine in the past 3 years (5.40, 3.36-8.77), believed in the effectiveness of vaccines (3.01, 2.20-4.12), and received media information regarding COVID-19 vaccine (2.23, 1.61-3.11), were more likely to be vaccinated. Concerning about adverse reactions (0.31, 0.22-0.44), negative impact on the progression of HIV/AIDS (0.36, 0.26-0.50) or antiretroviral therapy (ART) (0.61, 0.44-0.85), disclosure of HIV infection status (0.69, 0.49-0.96), comorbidities (0.33, 0.22-0.47), being unmarried (0.43, 0.28-0.66) and older age were negatively associated with vaccination. Of the 527 vaccinated PLHIV, 155 (29.4%) PLHIV reported adverse reactions, with pain at the injection site being the most common (18.2%). CONCLUSIONS: PLHIV, who are concerned about adverse reactions, negative impact on ART outcome and disclosure of HIV infection status, were less likely to adopt COVID-19 vaccination. To increase vaccination coverage among PLHIV, health-care professionals should emphasize the benefits and necessity of vaccination and provide consultancy regarding adverse reactions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Influenza Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Case-Control Studies , China/epidemiology , HIV Infections/complications , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
13.
Sleep Med ; 91: 273-281, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527859

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many COVID-19 survivors reported stigmatization after recovery. This study investigated the association between stigma (discrimination experiences, self-stigma and perceived affiliate stigma) and sleep quality among COVID-19 survivors six months after hospital discharge. METHODS: Participants were recovered adult COVID-19 survivors discharged between February 1 and April 30, 2020. Medical staff of five participating hospitals approached all discharged COVID-19 period during this period. A total of 199 participants completed the telephone interview during July to September, 2020. Structural equation modeling was performed to test the hypothesize that resilience and social support would mediate the associations between stigma and sleep quality. RESULTS: The results showed that 10.1% of the participants reported terrible/poor sleep quality, 26.1% reported worse sleep quality in the past week when comparing their current status versus the time before COVID-19. After adjusting for significant background characteristics, participants who had higher number of discrimination experience, perceived stronger self-stigma and stronger perceived affiliate stigma reported poorer sleep quality. Resilience and social support were positively and significantly associated with sleep quality. The indirect effect of self-stigma on sleep quality through social support and resilience was significant and negative. Perceived affiliate stigma also had a significant and negative indirect effect on sleep quality through social support and resilience. CONCLUSIONS: Various types of stigma after recovery were associated with poor sleep quality among COVID-19 survivors, while social support and resilience were protective factors. Resilience and social support mediated the associations between self-stigma/perceived affiliate stigma and sleep quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Adult , Hospitals , Humans , Patient Discharge , Sleep Quality , Social Support , Survivors
14.
BJPsych Open ; 7(6): e191, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463283

ABSTRACT

Background: Understanding factors associated with post-discharge sleep quality among COVID-19 survivors is important for intervention development. Aims: This study investigated sleep quality and its correlates among COVID-19 patients 6 months after their most recent hospital discharge. Method: Healthcare providers at hospitals located in five different Chinese cities contacted adult COVID-19 patients discharged between 1 February and 30 March 2020. A total of 199 eligible patients provided verbal informed consent and completed the interview. Using score on the single-item Sleep Quality Scale as the dependent variable, multiple linear regression models were fitted. Results: Among all participants, 10.1% reported terrible or poor sleep quality, and 26.6% reported fair sleep quality, 26.1% reported worse sleep quality when comparing their current status with the time before COVID-19, and 33.7% were bothered by a sleeping disorder in the past 2 weeks. After adjusting for significant background characteristics, factors associated with sleep quality included witnessing the suffering (adjusted B = -1.15, 95% CI = -1.70, -0.33) or death (adjusted B = -1.55, 95% CI = -2.62, -0.49) of other COVID-19 patients during hospital stay, depressive symptoms (adjusted B = -0.26, 95% CI = -0.31, -0.20), anxiety symptoms (adjusted B = -0.25, 95% CI = -0.33, -0.17), post-traumatic stress disorders (adjusted B = -0.16, 95% CI = -0.22, -0.10) and social support (adjusted B = 0.07, 95% CI = 0.04, 0.10). Conclusions: COVID-19 survivors reported poor sleep quality. Interventions and support services to improve sleep quality should be provided to COVID-19 survivors during their hospital stay and after hospital discharge.

15.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(9)2021 Sep 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430990

ABSTRACT

Mass vaccination against the COVID-19 pandemic is ongoing worldwide to achieve herd immunity among the general population. However, little is known about how the COVID-19 vaccination would affect mental health and preventive behaviors toward the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, we conducted a cross-sectional survey to address this issue among 4244 individuals at several COVID-19 vaccination sites in Guangzhou, China. Using univariate analysis and multiple linear regression models, we found that major demographic characteristics, such as biological sex, age, education level, and family per capita income, are the dominant influencing factors associated with health beliefs, mental health, and preventive behaviors. After propensity score matching (PSM) treatment, we further assessed the changes in the scores of health belief, mental health, and preventive behaviors between the pre-vaccination group and the post-vaccination group. When compared to individuals in the pre-vaccination group, a moderate but statistically significant lower score was observed in the post-vaccination group (p = 0.010), implying possibly improved psychological conditions after COVID-19 vaccination. In addition, there was also a moderate but statistically higher score of preventive behaviors in the post-vaccination group than in the pre-vaccination group (p < 0.001), suggesting a higher probability to take preventive measures after COVID-19 vaccination. These findings have implications for implementing non-pharmaceutical interventions combined with mass vaccination to control the rebound of COVID-19 outbreaks.

16.
J Int AIDS Soc ; 24(9): e25781, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384195

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected antiretroviral therapy (ART) continuity among people living with HIV (PLHIV) worldwide. We conducted a qualitative study to explore barriers to ART maintenance and solutions to ART interruption when stringent COVID-19 control measures were implemented in China, from the perspective of PLHIV and relevant key stakeholders. METHODS: Between 11 February and 15 February 2020, we interviewed PLHIV, community-based organization (CBO) workers, staff from centres for disease control and prevention (CDC) at various levels whose work is relevant to HIV care (CDC staff), HIV doctors and nurses and drug vendors from various regions in China. Semi-structured interviews were conducted using a messaging and social media app. Challenges and responses relevant to ART continuity during the COVID-19 pandemic were discussed. Themes were identified by transcript coding and mindmaps. RESULTS: Sixty-four stakeholders were recruited, including 16 PLHIV, 17 CBO workers, 15 CDC staff, 14 HIV doctors and nurses and two drug vendors. Many CDC staff, HIV doctors and nurses responsible for ART delivery and HIV care were shifted to COVID-19 response efforts. Barriers to ART maintenance were (a) travel restrictions, (b) inadequate communication and bureaucratic obstacles, (c) shortage in personnel, (d) privacy concerns, and (e) insufficient ART reserve. CBO helped PLHIV maintain access to ART through five solutions identified from thematic analysis: (a) coordination to refill ART from local CDC clinics or hospitals, (b) delivery of ART by mail, (c) privacy protection measures, (d) mental health counselling, and (e) providing connections to alternative sources of ART. Drug vendors contributed to ART maintenance by selling out-of-pocket ART. CONCLUSIONS: Social and institutional disruption from COVID-19 contributed to increased risk of ART interruption among PLHIV in China. Collaboration among key stakeholders was needed to maintain access to ART, with CBO playing an important role. Other countries facing ART interruption during current or future public health emergencies may learn from the solutions employed in China.


Subject(s)
Anti-Retroviral Agents/supply & distribution , Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active/methods , COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Health Services Accessibility , Adult , Anti-Retroviral Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/psychology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Stakeholder Participation
17.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 10(1): 94, 2021 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352672

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Various modalities of vaccines against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), based on different platforms and immunization procedures, have been successively approved for marketing worldwide. A comprehensive review for clinical trials assessing the safety of COVID-19 vaccines is urgently needed to make an accurate judgment for mass vaccination. MAIN TEXT: A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to determine the safety of COVID-19 vaccine candidates in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Data search was performed in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, Scopus, Web of Science, and MedRxiv. Included articles were limited to RCTs on COVID-19 vaccines. A total of 73,633 subjects from 14 articles were included to compare the risks of adverse events following immunization (AEFI) after vaccinating different COVID-19 vaccines. Pooled risk ratios (RR) of total AEFI for inactivated vaccine, viral-vectored vaccine, and mRNA vaccine were 1.34 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-1.61, P < 0.001], 1.65 (95% CI 1.31-2.07, P < 0.001), and 2.01 (95% CI 1.78-2.26, P < 0.001), respectively. No significant differences on local and systemic AEFI were found between the first dose and second dose. In addition, people aged ≤ 55 years were at significantly higher risk of AEFI than people aged ≥ 56 years, with a pooled RR of 1.25 (95% CI 1.15-1.35, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The safety and tolerance of current COVID-19 vaccine candidates are acceptable for mass vaccination, with inactivated COVID-19 vaccines candidates having the lowest reported AEFI. Long-term surveillance of vaccine safety is required, especially among elderly people with underlying medical conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Young Adult
19.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 17(7): 2279-2288, 2021 07 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1057794

ABSTRACT

Background: A safe and effective vaccine against COVID-19 has become a public health priority. However, little is known about the public willingness to accept a future COVID-19 vaccine in China. This study aimed to understand the willingness and determinants for the acceptance of a COVID-19 vaccine among Chinese adults.Methods: A cross-sectional survey using an online questionnaire was conducted in an adult population in China. Chi-square tests were used to identify differences for various intentions regarding COVID-19 vaccination. The t test was used to identify differences among vaccine hesitancy scores. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the predicated factors associated with the willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.Results: Of the 3195 eligible participants, 83.8% were willing to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, and 76.6% believed the vaccine would be beneficial to their health; however, 74.9% expressed concerns or a neutral attitude regarding its potential adverse effects. Of the participants, 76.5% preferred domestically manufactured vaccines and were more willing to be vaccinated than those who preferred imported vaccines. Multivariable logistic regression indicated that lack of confidence, complacency in regard to health, risk of the vaccine, and attention frequency were the main factors affecting the intention to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.Conclusion: Our study indicated that the respondents in China had a high willingness to accept a COVID-19 vaccine, but some participants also worried about its adverse effects. Information regarding the efficacy and safety of an upcoming COVID-19 vaccine should be disseminated to ensure its acceptance and coverage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adult , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination
20.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(11): e23853, 2020 11 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-976121

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel COVID-19 disease has spread worldwide, resulting in a new pandemic. The Chinese government implemented strong intervention measures in the early stage of the epidemic, including strict travel bans and social distancing policies. Prioritizing the analysis of different contributing factors to outbreak outcomes is important for the precise prevention and control of infectious diseases. We proposed a novel framework for resolving this issue and applied it to data from China. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to systematically identify national-level and city-level contributing factors to the control of COVID-19 in China. METHODS: Daily COVID-19 case data and related multidimensional data, including travel-related, medical, socioeconomic, environmental, and influenza-like illness factors, from 343 cities in China were collected. A correlation analysis and interpretable machine learning algorithm were used to evaluate the quantitative contribution of factors to new cases and COVID-19 growth rates during the epidemic period (ie, January 17 to February 29, 2020). RESULTS: Many factors correlated with the spread of COVID-19 in China. Travel-related population movement was the main contributing factor for new cases and COVID-19 growth rates in China, and its contributions were as high as 77% and 41%, respectively. There was a clear lag effect for travel-related factors (previous vs current week: new cases, 45% vs 32%; COVID-19 growth rates, 21% vs 20%). Travel from non-Wuhan regions was the single factor with the most significant impact on COVID-19 growth rates (contribution: new cases, 12%; COVID-19 growth rate, 26%), and its contribution could not be ignored. City flow, a measure of outbreak control strength, contributed 16% and 7% to new cases and COVID-19 growth rates, respectively. Socioeconomic factors also played important roles in COVID-19 growth rates in China (contribution, 28%). Other factors, including medical, environmental, and influenza-like illness factors, also contributed to new cases and COVID-19 growth rates in China. Based on our analysis of individual cities, compared to Beijing, population flow from Wuhan and internal flow within Wenzhou were driving factors for increasing the number of new cases in Wenzhou. For Chongqing, the main contributing factor for new cases was population flow from Hubei, beyond Wuhan. The high COVID-19 growth rates in Wenzhou were driven by population-related factors. CONCLUSIONS: Many factors contributed to the COVID-19 outbreak outcomes in China. The differential effects of various factors, including specific city-level factors, emphasize the importance of precise, targeted strategies for controlling the COVID-19 outbreak and future infectious disease outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , China/epidemiology , Factor Analysis, Statistical , Humans
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