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1.
Small ; 18(26): e2200854, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1858927

ABSTRACT

The ongoing pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is profoundly influencing the global healthcare system and people's daily lives. The high resource consumption of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is resulting in insufficient surveillance of coinfection or resurgence of other critical respiratory epidemics, which is of public concern. To facilitate evaluation of the current coinfection situation, a microfluidic system (MAPnavi) is developed for the rapid (<40 min) and sensitive diagnosis of multiple respiratory viruses from swab samples in a fully sealed and automated manner, in which a nested-recombinase polymerase amplification and the CRISPR-based amplification system is first proposed to ensure the sensitivity and specificity. This novel system has a remarkably low limit of detection (50-200 copies mL-1 ) and is successfully applied to detect 171 clinical samples (98.5% positive predictive agreement; 100% negative predictive agreement), and the results identify 45.6% coinfection among clinical samples from patients with COVID-19. This approach has the potential to shift diagnostic and surveillance efforts from targeted testing for a high-priority virus to comprehensive testing of multiple virus sets and to greatly benefit the implementation of decentralized testing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Viruses , COVID-19/diagnosis , CRISPR-Cas Systems/genetics , Coinfection/diagnosis , Humans , Microfluidics , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/methods , Sensitivity and Specificity
2.
Viruses ; 14(3)2022 03 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765949

ABSTRACT

Gene therapy and vaccine development need more novel adenovirus vectors. Here, we attempt to provide strategies to construct adenovirus vectors based on restriction-assembly for researchers with little experience in this field. Restriction-assembly is a combined method of restriction digestion and Gibson assembly, by which the major part of the obtained plasmid comes from digested DNA fragments instead of PCR products. We demonstrated the capability of restriction-assembly in manipulating the genome of simian adenovirus 1 (SAdV-1) in this study. A PCR product of the plasmid backbone was combined with SAdV-1 genomic DNA to construct an infectious clone, plasmid pKSAV1, by Gibson assembly. Restriction-assembly was performed repeatedly in the steps of intermediate plasmid isolation, modification, and restoration. The generated adenoviral plasmid was linearized by restriction enzyme digestion and transfected into packaging 293 cells to rescue E3-deleted replication-competent SAdV1XE3-CGA virus. Interestingly, SAdV1XE3-CGA could propagate in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells. The E1 region was similarly modified to generate E1/E3-deleted replication-defective virus SAdV1-EG. SAdV1-EG had a moderate gene transfer ability to adherent mammalian cells, and it could efficiently transduce suspension cells when compared with the human adenovirus 5 control vector. Restriction-assembly is easy to use and can be performed without special experimental materials and instruments. It is highly effective with verifiable outcomes at each step. More importantly, restriction-assembly makes the established vector system modifiable, upgradable and under sustainable development, and it can serve as the instructive method or strategy for the synthetic biology of adenoviruses.


Subject(s)
Adenoviruses, Human , Adenoviruses, Simian , Adenoviridae/genetics , Adenoviruses, Human/genetics , Adenoviruses, Simian/genetics , Animals , DNA , Genetic Vectors/genetics , Humans , Mammals
3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-311704

ABSTRACT

Background: Seasonal human coronaviruses (HCoVs) including HCoV-229E, -OC43, -NL63 and -HKU1 are widely spreading in global human populations. However, the relevance of humoral response against seasonal HCoVs to COVID-19 pathogenesis is elusive.Methods: We profiled the temporal changes of IgG antibodies against spike (S;S-IgG) proteins of SARS-CoV-2 and seasonal HCoVs in 838 plasma samples collected from 344 COVID-19 patients. We tested the antigenic cross-reactivity of S protein between SARS-CoV-2 and seasonal HCoVs and evaluated the correlations between HCoV-OC43 S-IgG antibody and disease severity in COVID-19 patients.Findings: SARS-CoV-2 S-IgG titers mounted until days 22–28, whereas HCoV-OC43 antibody titers increased until days 15–21 and then plateaued until day 46. However, IgG antibody titers against HCoV-NL63, -229E, and -HKU1 showed no significant increasing. A two-way cross-reactivity was identified between SARS-CoV-2 and HCoV-OC43. Neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 were not detected in healthy controls who were positive for HCoV-OC43 S-IgG. HCoV-OC43 S-IgG titers were significantly higher in patients with severe disease than those in mild/moderate patients at days 1–21 post symptom onset (PSO). Higher levels of HCoV-OC43 S-IgG were also observed in patients requiring mechanical ventilation and the elderly. At days 1–10 PSO, HCoV-OC43 S-IgG titers correlated to disease severity in all age groups, and to fatality in over 60-year group.Interpretation: Our data indicate that there exist a humoral cross-reactive response between HCoV-OC43 and SARS-CoV-2. The cross-reactive HCoV-OC43 S-IgG antibody is not protective against SARS-CoV-2, but may be a risk factor for the severity and adverse outcome of COVID-19.Funding Statement: This study was funded in part by the National Major Science & Technology Project for Control and Prevention of Major Infectious Diseases in China (2017ZX10204401, 2018ZX10734404), Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) Innovation Fund for Medical Sciences (2016-I2M-1–014, 2018-I2M-1-003, 2020-I2M-1-001, 2020-I2M-CoV19-005), Natural Science Foundation of China (82041011/H0104), and National Key R&D Program of China (2020YFA0707600). Declaration of Interests: The authors declare no competing interests.Ethics Approval Statement: This study was approved by the Ethical Review Board of Wuhan Jinyintan Hospital, Infectious Disease Hospital of Heilongjiang Province (Harbin), and Institute of Pathogen Biology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. Written informed consent was obtained from each healthy volunteer and COVID-19 patients in cohort 4. Written informed consents from the remaining patients were waived in light of the emerging infectious disease of high public health relevance.

4.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-319973

ABSTRACT

Background: The pandemic of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is ongoing globally, which is a big challenge for public health. Alteration of human microbiota had been observed in COVID-19. However, it is unknown how the microbiota is associated with the fatality in COVID-19.Methods: We conducted metatranscriptome sequencing on 588 longitudinal oropharyngeal swab specimens collected from 192 COVID-19 patients recruited in the LOTUS clinical trial (Registration number: ChiCTR2000029308) (including 39 deceased patients), and 95 healthy controls from the same geographic area.Findings: The upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiota in COVID-19 patients differed from that in healthy controls, while deceased patients possessed a more distinct microbiota. Streptococcus was enriched in recovered patients, whereas potential pathogens, including Candida and Enterococcus, were more abundant in deceased patients. Moreover, the microbiota dominated by Streptococcus was more stable than that dominated by other species. In contrast, the URT microbiota in deceased patients showed a more significant alteration and became more deviated from the norm after admission. The abundance of Streptococcus on admission, particularly that of S. parasanguis, was identified as a strong predictor of fatality by Cox and L1 regularized logistic regression analysis, thus could be used as a potential prognostic biomarker of COVID-19.Interpretation Alteration of the URT microbiota was observed in COVID-19 patients and was associated with the fatality rate. A higher abundance of Streptococcus, especially S. parasanguis, on admission in oropharyngeal swabs predicts a better outcome. The generalization of the results in other populations and underlying mechanisms need further investigations.Trial Registration: Participants were enrolled in ChiCTR2000029308.Funding: This study was funded in part by the National Major Science & Technology Project for Control and Prevention of Major Infectious Diseases in China (2017ZX10103004, 2018ZX10301401), the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) Innovation Fund for Medical Sciences (2019-I2M-2-XX, 2016-I2M-1-014, 2018-I2M-1-003), The Non-profit Central Research Institute Fund of CAMS (2020HY320001, 2019PT310029), Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Genomics (ICG), and Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Structural Biology (ICSB).Declaration of Interests: All authors declare no competing interests.Ethics Approval Statement: The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Jin Yin-Tan Hospital (KY2020-02.01). Written informed consent was obtained from all patients or their legal representatives if they were too unwell to provide consent.

5.
Virol Sin ; 37(1): 30-37, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639630

ABSTRACT

Little is known about Subgenomic RNA (sgRNA) dynamics in patients with Coronavirus diseases 2019 (COVID-19). We collected 147 throat swabs, 74 gut swabs and 46 plasma samples from 117 COVID-19 patients recruited in the LOTUS China trial (ChiCTR2000029308) and compared E and orf7a sgRNA load in patients with different illness duration, outcome, and comorbidities. Both sgRNAs were detected in all the three types of samples, with longest duration of 25, 13, and 17 days for E sgRNA, and 32, 28, and 17 days for orf7a sgRNA in throat, gut, and plasma, respectively. A total of 95% (57/60) of patients had no E sgRNA detected after 10 days post treatment, though 86% of them were still E RNA positive. High correlation on titer was observed between sgRNA encoding E and orf7a gene. sgRNA showed similar variation in the standard care and Lopinavir-Ritonavir group. Patients with diabetes and heart diseases showed higher pharyngeal E sgRNA at the first day (P â€‹= â€‹0.016 and 0.013, respectively) but no difference at five days after treatment, compared with patients without such commodities. Patients with hypertension and cerebrovascular diseases showed no difference in the pharyngeal sgRNA levels at both one and five days after treatment, compared with patients without these two commodities. E sgRNA levels in the initial infection showed no correlation with the serum antibody against spike, nucleoprotein, and receptor binding domains at ten days later. sgRNA lasted a long period in COVID-19 patients and might have little effect on humoral response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , China , Humans , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Serologic Tests
6.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 204(12): 1379-1390, 2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430274

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Alteration of human respiratory microbiota had been observed in coronavirus disease (COVID-19). How the microbiota is associated with the prognosis in COVID-19 is unclear. Objectives: To characterize the feature and dynamics of the respiratory microbiota and its associations with clinical features in patients with COVID-19. Methods: We conducted metatranscriptome sequencing on 588 longitudinal oropharyngeal swab specimens collected from 192 patients with COVID-19 (including 39 deceased patients) and 95 healthy controls from the same geographic area. Meanwhile, the concentration of 27 cytokines and chemokines in plasma was measured for patients with COVID-19. Measurements and Main Results: The upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiota in patients with COVID-19 differed from that in healthy controls, whereas deceased patients possessed a more distinct microbiota, both on admission and before discharge/death. The alteration of URT microbiota showed a significant correlation with the concentration of proinflammatory cytokines and mortality. Specifically, Streptococcus-dominated microbiota was enriched in recovered patients, and showed high temporal stability and resistance against pathogens. In contrast, the microbiota in deceased patients was more susceptible to secondary infections and became more deviated from the norm after admission. Moreover, the abundance of S. parasanguinis on admission was significantly correlated with prognosis in nonsevere patients (lower vs. higher abundance, odds ratio, 7.80; 95% CI, 1.70-42.05). Conclusions: URT microbiota dysbiosis is a remarkable manifestation of COVID-19; its association with mortality suggests it may reflect the interplay between pathogens, symbionts, and the host immune status. Whether URT microbiota could be used as a biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of respiratory diseases merits further investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/mortality , Microbiota , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/mortality , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 21(12): 1614-1615, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284635
8.
Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol ; 14: 385-387, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1200016

ABSTRACT

As the number of COVID-19 cases increasing, more and more patients are concerning about alopecia, a sequela after SARS-CoV-2 infection. We here report a case of a 38-year-old woman with a typical acute telogen effluvium (ATE) after recovery from COVID-19.

9.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 664-676, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1139855

ABSTRACT

Seasonal human coronaviruses (HCoVs) including HCoV-229E, -OC43, -NL63, and -HKU1 widely spread in global human populations. However, the relevance of humoral response against seasonal HCoVs to COVID-19 pathogenesis is elusive. In this study, we profiled the temporal changes of IgG antibody against spike proteins (S-IgG) of SARS-CoV-2 and seasonal HCoVs in 838 plasma samples collected from 344 COVID-19 patients. We tested the antigenic cross-reactivities of S protein between SARS-CoV-2 and seasonal HCoVs and evaluated the correlations between the levels of HCoV-OC43 S-IgG and the disease severity in COVID-19 patients. We found that SARS-CoV-2 S-IgG titres mounted until days 22-28, whereas HCoV-OC43 antibody titres increased until days 15-21 and then plateaued until day 46. However, IgG titres against HCoV-NL63, -229E, and -HKU1 showed no significant increase. A two-way cross-reactivity was identified between SARS-CoV-2 and HCoV-OC43. Neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 were not detectable in healthy controls who were positive for HCoV-OC43 S-IgG. HCoV-OC43 S-IgG titres were significantly higher in patients with severe disease than those in mild patients at days 1-21 post symptom onset (PSO). Higher levels of HCoV-OC43 S-IgG were also observed in patients requiring mechanical ventilation. At days 1-10 PSO, HCoV-OC43 S-IgG titres correlated to disease severity in the age group over 60. Our data indicate that there is a correlation between cross-reactive antibody against HCoV-OC43 spike protein and disease severity in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cross Reactions/immunology , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
10.
EBioMedicine ; 62: 103125, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-938894

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pharmacokinetics and appropriate dose regimens of favipiravir are unknown in hospitalized influenza patients; such data are also needed to determine dosage selection for favipiravir trials in COVID-19. METHODS: In this dose-escalating study, favipiravir pharmacokinetics and tolerability were assessed in critically ill influenza patients. Participants received one of two dosing regimens; Japan licensed dose (1600 mg BID on day 1 and 600 mg BID on the following days) and the higher dose (1800 mg/800 mg BID) trialed in uncomplicated influenza. The primary pharmacokinetic endpoint was the proportion of patients with a minimum observed plasma trough concentration (Ctrough) ≥20 mg/L at all measured time points after the second dose. RESULTS: Sixteen patients were enrolled into the low dose group and 19 patients into the high dose group of the study. Favipiravir Ctrough decreased significantly over time in both groups (p <0.01). Relative to day 2 (48 hrs), concentrations were 91.7% and 90.3% lower in the 1600/600 mg group and 79.3% and 89.5% lower in the 1800/800 mg group at day 7 and 10, respectively. In contrast, oseltamivir concentrations did not change significantly over time. A 2-compartment disposition model with first-order absorption and elimination described the observed favipiravir concentration-time data well. Modeling demonstrated that less than 50% of patients achieved Ctrough ≥20 mg/L for >80% of the duration of treatment of the two dose regimens evaluated (18.8% and 42.1% of patients for low and high dose regimen, respectively). Increasing the favipravir dosage predicted a higher proportion of patients reaching this threshold of 20 mg/L, suggesting that dosing regimens of ≥3600/2600 mg might be required for adequate concentrations. The two dosing regimens were well-tolerated in critical ill patients with influenza. CONCLUSION: The two dosing regimens proposed for uncomplicated influenza did not achieve our pre-defined treatment threshold.


Subject(s)
Amides , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Oseltamivir , Pyrazines , Aged , Amides/administration & dosage , Amides/pharmacokinetics , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Oseltamivir/administration & dosage , Oseltamivir/pharmacokinetics , Pyrazines/administration & dosage , Pyrazines/pharmacokinetics , Severity of Illness Index
11.
China CDC Wkly ; 2(44): 867-869, 2020 Oct 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-904517
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