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1.
Cell Reports ; : 110864, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1821172

ABSTRACT

Summary The pathological and immune response of individuals with COVID-19 display different dynamics in lung and intestine. Here, we depict the single-cell transcriptional atlas of longitudinally collected lung and intestinal tissue samples from SARS-CoV-2-infected monkeys at 3 to 10 dpi. We find that intestinal enterocytes are degraded at 3 days post-infection but recovered rapidly, revealing that infection has mild effects on the intestine. Crucially, we observe suppression of the inflammatory response and tissue damage related to B-cell and Paneth cell accumulation in the intestines, although T cells are activated in the SARS-CoV-2 infection. Compared with that in the lung, the expression of interferon response-related genes is inhibited, and inflammatory factor secretion is reduced in the intestines. Our findings indicate an imbalance of immune dynamic in intestinal mucosa during SARS-CoV-2 infection, which may underlie ongoing rectal viral shedding and mild tissue damage.

4.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 1156-1168, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249264

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACTThe risk of secondary infection with SARS-CoV-2 and influenza A virus is becoming a practical problem that must be addressed as the flu season merges with the COVID-19 pandemic. As SARS-CoV-2 and influenza A virus have been found in patients, understanding the in vivo characteristics of the secondary infection between these two viruses is a high priority. Here, hACE2 transgenic mice were challenged with the H1N1 virus at a nonlethal dose during the convalescent stage on 7 and 14 days post SARS-CoV-2 infection, and importantly, subsequent H1N1 infection showed enhanced viral shedding and virus tissue distribution. Histopathological observation revealed an extensive pathological change in the lungs related to H1N1 infection in mice recovered from SARS-CoV-2 infection, with severe inflammation infiltration and bronchiole disruption. Moreover, upon H1N1 exposure on 7 and 14 dpi of SARS-CoV-2 infection, the lymphocyte population activated at a lower level with T cell suppressed in both PBMC and lung. These findings will be valuable for evaluating antiviral therapeutics and vaccines as well as guiding public health work.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/pathology , Acute Lung Injury/virology , Animals , COVID-19/therapy , Coinfection/pathology , Coinfection/virology , Cytokines/blood , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/isolation & purification , Lung/pathology , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphocytes/immunology , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viral Load , Virus Replication/physiology , Virus Shedding/physiology
5.
Bioconjug Chem ; 32(5): 1034-1046, 2021 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217668

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 caused the COVID-19 pandemic that lasted for more than a year. Globally, there is an urgent need to use safe and effective vaccines for immunization to achieve comprehensive protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection. Focusing on developing a rapid vaccine platform with significant immunogenicity as well as broad and high protection efficiency, we designed a SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) displayed on self-assembled ferritin nanoparticles. In a 293i cells eukaryotic expression system, this candidate vaccine was prepared and purified. After rhesus monkeys are immunized with 20 µg of RBD-ferritin nanoparticles three times, the vaccine can elicit specific humoral immunity and T cell immune response, and the neutralizing antibodies can cross-neutralize four SARS-CoV-2 strains from different sources. In the challenge protection test, after nasal infection with 2 × 105 CCID50 SARS-CoV-2 virus, compared with unimmunized control animals, virus replication in the vaccine-immunized rhesus monkeys was significantly inhibited, and respiratory pathology observations also showed only slight pathological damage. These analyses will benefit the immunization program of the RBD-ferritin nanoparticle vaccine in the clinical trial design and the platform construction to present a specific antigen domain in the self-assembling nanoparticle in a short time to harvest stable, safe, and effective vaccine candidates for new SARS-CoV-2 isolates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Binding Sites , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Ferritins/chemistry , Ferritins/metabolism , Immunity, Humoral , Macaca mulatta , Male , Nanoparticles/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Ultracentrifugation
6.
Food Funct ; 11(4): 3516-3526, 2020 Apr 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-726012

ABSTRACT

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic, progressive lung disease with few successful treatments, and is strongly associated with cigarette smoking (CS). Since the novel coronavirus has spread worldwide seriously, there is growing concern that patients who have chronic respiratory conditions like COPD can easily be infected and are more prone to having severe illness and even mortality because of lung dysfunction. Loquat leaves have long been used as an important material for both pharmaceutical and functional applications in the treatment of lung disease in Asia, especially in China and Japan. Total flavonoids (TF), the main active components derived from loquat leaves, showed remarkable anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. However, their protective activity against CS-induced COPD airway inflammation and oxidative stress and its underlying mechanism still remain not well-understood. The present study uses a CS-induced mouse model to estimate the morphological changes in lung tissue. The results demonstrated that TF suppressed the histological changes in the lungs of CS-challenged mice, as evidenced by reduced generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-1ß, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), nitric oxide (NO), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and diminished the protein expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). Moreover, TF also inhibited phosphorylation of IKK, IκB and NFκB and increased p-Akt. Interestingly, TF could inhibit CS-induced oxidative stress in the lungs of COPD mice. TF treatment significantly inhibited the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD). In addition, TF markedly downregulated TRPV1 and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) and upregulated the expression of SOD-2, while the p-JNK level was observed to be inhibited in COPD mice. Taken together, our findings showed that the protective effect and putative mechanism of the action of TF resulted in the inhibition of inflammation and oxidative stress through the regulation of TRPV1 and the related signal pathway in lung tissues. It suggested that TF derived from loquat leaves could be considered to be an alternative or a new functional material and used for the treatment of CS-induced COPD.


Subject(s)
Cigarette Smoking/adverse effects , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/administration & dosage , Eriobotrya/chemistry , Flavonoids/administration & dosage , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/drug therapy , TRPV Cation Channels/immunology , Animals , Cytochrome P-450 CYP2E1/genetics , Cytochrome P-450 CYP2E1/immunology , Humans , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/immunology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Plant Leaves/chemistry , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/etiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/immunology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Smoke/adverse effects , Superoxide Dismutase/genetics , Superoxide Dismutase/immunology , TRPV Cation Channels/genetics
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