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1.
Intensive Care Med ; 48(7): 850-864, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1899125

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Although there is evidence supporting the benefits of corticosteroids in patients affected with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), there is little information related to their potential benefits or harm in some subgroups of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with COVID-19. We aim to investigate to find candidate variables to guide personalized treatment with steroids in critically ill patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Multicentre, observational cohort study including consecutive COVID-19 patients admitted to 55 Spanish ICUs. The primary outcome was 90-day mortality. Subsequent analyses in clinically relevant subgroups by age, ICU baseline illness severity, organ damage, laboratory findings and mechanical ventilation were performed. High doses of corticosteroids (≥ 12 mg/day equivalent dexamethasone dose), early administration of corticosteroid treatment (< 7 days since symptom onset) and long term of corticosteroids (≥ 10 days) were also investigated. RESULTS: Between February 2020 and October 2021, 4226 patients were included. Of these, 3592 (85%) patients had received systemic corticosteroids during hospitalisation. In the propensity-adjusted multivariable analysis, the use of corticosteroids was protective for 90-day mortality in the overall population (HR 0.77 [0.65-0.92], p = 0.003) and in-hospital mortality (SHR 0.70 [0.58-0.84], p < 0.001). Significant effect modification was found after adjustment for covariates using propensity score for age (p = 0.001 interaction term), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (p = 0.014 interaction term), and mechanical ventilation (p = 0.001 interaction term). We observed a beneficial effect of corticosteroids on 90-day mortality in various patient subgroups, including those patients aged ≥ 60 years; those with higher baseline severity; and those receiving invasive mechanical ventilation at ICU admission. Early administration was associated with a higher risk of 90-day mortality in the overall population (HR 1.32 [1.14-1.53], p < 0.001). Long-term use was associated with a lower risk of 90-day mortality in the overall population (HR 0.71 [0.61-0.82], p < 0.001). No effect was found regarding the dosage of corticosteroids. Moreover, the use of corticosteroids was associated with an increased risk of nosocomial bacterial pneumonia and hyperglycaemia. CONCLUSION: Corticosteroid in ICU-admitted patients with COVID-19 may be administered based on age, severity, baseline inflammation, and invasive mechanical ventilation. Early administration since symptom onset may prove harmful.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Critical Illness/therapy , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Precision Medicine , Respiration, Artificial , Steroids/therapeutic use
2.
Lancet Reg Health Eur ; 18: 100422, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1867458

ABSTRACT

Background: The clinical heterogeneity of COVID-19 suggests the existence of different phenotypes with prognostic implications. We aimed to analyze comorbidity patterns in critically ill COVID-19 patients and assess their impact on in-hospital outcomes, response to treatment and sequelae. Methods: Multicenter prospective/retrospective observational study in intensive care units of 55 Spanish hospitals. 5866 PCR-confirmed COVID-19 patients had comorbidities recorded at hospital admission; clinical and biological parameters, in-hospital procedures and complications throughout the stay; and, clinical complications, persistent symptoms and sequelae at 3 and 6 months. Findings: Latent class analysis identified 3 phenotypes using training and test subcohorts: low-morbidity (n=3385; 58%), younger and with few comorbidities; high-morbidity (n=2074; 35%), with high comorbid burden; and renal-morbidity (n=407; 7%), with chronic kidney disease (CKD), high comorbidity burden and the worst oxygenation profile. Renal-morbidity and high-morbidity had more in-hospital complications and higher mortality risk than low-morbidity (adjusted HR (95% CI): 1.57 (1.34-1.84) and 1.16 (1.05-1.28), respectively). Corticosteroids, but not tocilizumab, were associated with lower mortality risk (HR (95% CI) 0.76 (0.63-0.93)), especially in renal-morbidity and high-morbidity. Renal-morbidity and high-morbidity showed the worst lung function throughout the follow-up, with renal-morbidity having the highest risk of infectious complications (6%), emergency visits (29%) or hospital readmissions (14%) at 6 months (p<0.01). Interpretation: Comorbidity-based phenotypes were identified and associated with different expression of in-hospital complications, mortality, treatment response, and sequelae, with CKD playing a major role. This could help clinicians in day-to-day decision making including the management of post-discharge COVID-19 sequelae. Funding: ISCIII, UNESPA, CIBERES, FEDER, ESF.

3.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 2022 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1866994

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if the detection of N antigen of SARS-CoV-2 in plasma by a rapid lateral flow test predicts 90-day mortality in COVID-19 patients hospitalized at the wards. METHODS: The presence of N-antigenemia was evaluated in the first 36 hours following hospitalization in 600 unvaccinated COVID-19 patients, by using the Panbio® COVID-19 Ag Rapid Test Device from Abbott (Chicago, IL, USA). The impact of N-antigenemia on 90-day mortality was assessed by multivariable Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: Prevalence of N-antigenemia at hospitalization was higher in non survivors (69% [82/118] vs 52% [250/482] < 0.001). Patients with N-antigenemia showed more frequently RNAemia (45.7% [148/324] vs 19.8% [51/257, <0.001), absence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 N antibodies (80.7% [264/327] vs 26.6% [69/259], <0.001) and absence of S1 antibodies (73.4% [240/327] vs 23.6% [61/259], <0.001). Patients with antigenemia showed more frequently ARDS (30.1% [100/332] vs 18.7% [50/268], 0.001) and nosocomial infections (13.6% [45/331] vs 7.9% [21/267], 0.026). N-antigenemia was a risk factor for increased 90-day mortality in the multivariable analysis (1.99 [1.09 - 3.61]) (HR [CI95%]), while the presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 N antibodies represented a protective factor (0.47 [0.26 - 0.85]). CONCLUSIONS: The presence of N-antigenemia, or the absence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 N antibodies following hospitalization is associated to increased 90-day mortality in unvaccinated COVID-19 patients. Detection of N-antigenemia by using lateral flow tests is a quick, widely available tool that could contribute to early identify those COVID-19 patients at risk of deterioration.

4.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 1537-1549, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860764

ABSTRACT

There is a limited understanding of the pathophysiology of postacute pulmonary sequelae in severe COVID-19. The aim of current study was to define the circulating microRNA (miRNA) profiles associated with pulmonary function and radiologic features in survivors of SARS-CoV-2-induced ARDS. The study included patients who developed ARDS secondary to SARS-CoV-2 infection (n = 167) and a group of infected patients who did not develop ARDS (n = 33). Patients were evaluated 3 months after hospital discharge. The follow-up included a complete pulmonary evaluation and chest computed tomography. Plasma miRNA profiling was performed using RT-qPCR. Random forest was used to construct miRNA signatures associated with lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) and total severity score (TSS). Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analyses were conducted. DLCO < 80% predicted was observed in 81.8% of the patients. TSS showed a median [P25;P75] of 5 [2;8]. The miRNA model associated with DLCO comprised miR-17-5p, miR-27a-3p, miR-126-3p, miR-146a-5p and miR-495-3p. Concerning radiologic features, a miRNA signature composed by miR-9-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-24-3p and miR-221-3p correlated with TSS values. These associations were not observed in the non-ARDS group. KEGG pathway and GO enrichment analyses provided evidence of molecular mechanisms related not only to profibrotic or anti-inflammatory states but also to cell death, immune response, hypoxia, vascularization, coagulation and viral infection. In conclusion, diffusing capacity and radiological features in survivors from SARS-CoV-2-induced ARDS are associated with specific miRNA profiles. These findings provide novel insights into the possible molecular pathways underlying the pathogenesis of pulmonary sequelae.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT04457505..Trial registration: ISRCTN.org identifier: ISRCTN16865246..


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Circulating MicroRNA , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , COVID-19/complications , Circulating MicroRNA/genetics , Humans , Lung , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Survivors
6.
Archivos de bronconeumologia ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1801724

ABSTRACT

Introduction The COVID-19 pandemic created tremendous challenges for health-care systems. Intensive care units (ICU) were hit with a large volume of patients requiring ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and other organ support with very high mortality. The Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red-Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), a network of Spanish researchers to investigate in respiratory disease, commissioned the current proposal in response to the Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII) call. Methods CIBERESUCICOVID is a multicenter, observational, prospective/retrospective cohort study of patients with COVID-19 admitted to Spanish ICUs. Several work packages were created, including study population and ICU data collection, follow-up, biomarkers and miRNAs, data management and quality. Results This study included 6102 consecutive patients admitted to 55 ICUs homogeneously distributed throughout Spain and the collection of blood samples from more than 1000 patients. We enrolled a large population of COVID-19 ICU-admitted patients including baseline characteristics, ICU and MV data, treatments complications, and outcomes. The in-hospital mortality was 31%, and 76% of patients required invasive mechanical ventilation. A 3-6 month and 1 year follow-up was performed. Few deaths after 1 year discharge were registered. Low anti-SARS-CoV-2 S antibody levels predict mortality in critical COVID-19. These antibodies contribute to prevent systemic dissemination of SARS-CoV-2. The severity of COVID-19 impacts the circulating miRNA profile. Plasma miRNA profiling emerges as a useful tool for risk-based patient stratification in critically ill COVID-19 patients. Conclusions We present the methodology used in a large multicenter study sponsored by ISCIII to determine the short- and long-term outcomes in patients with COVID-19 admitted to more than 50 Spanish ICUs.

7.
Arch Bronconeumol ; 58 Suppl 1: 22-31, 2022 Apr.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797167

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic created tremendous challenges for health-care systems. Intensive care units (ICU) were hit with a large volume of patients requiring ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and other organ support with very high mortality. The Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red-Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), a network of Spanish researchers to investigate in respiratory disease, commissioned the current proposal in response to the Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII) call. METHODS: CIBERESUCICOVID is a multicenter, observational, prospective/retrospective cohort study of patients with COVID-19 admitted to Spanish ICUs. Several work packages were created, including study population and ICU data collection, follow-up, biomarkers and miRNAs, data management and quality. RESULTS: This study included 6102 consecutive patients admitted to 55 ICUs homogeneously distributed throughout Spain and the collection of blood samples from more than 1000 patients. We enrolled a large population of COVID-19 ICU-admitted patients including baseline characteristics, ICU and MV data, treatments complications, and outcomes. The in-hospital mortality was 31%, and 76% of patients required invasive mechanical ventilation. A 3-6 month and 1 year follow-up was performed. Few deaths after 1 year discharge were registered. Low anti-SARS-CoV-2 S antibody levels predict mortality in critical COVID-19. These antibodies contribute to prevent systemic dissemination of SARS-CoV-2. The severity of COVID-19 impacts the circulating miRNA profile. Plasma miRNA profiling emerges as a useful tool for risk-based patient stratification in critically ill COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS: We present the methodology used in a large multicenter study sponsored by ISCIII to determine the short- and long-term outcomes in patients with COVID-19 admitted to more than 50 Spanish ICUs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , MicroRNAs , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Illness/therapy , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Crit Care Med ; 50(6): 945-954, 2022 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722615

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the sleep and circadian rest-activity pattern of critical COVID-19 survivors 3 months after hospital discharge. DESIGN: Observational, prospective study. SETTING: Single-center study. PATIENTS: One hundred seventy-two consecutive COVID-19 survivors admitted to the ICU with acute respiratory distress syndrome. INTERVENTIONS: Seven days of actigraphy for sleep and circadian rest-activity pattern assessment; validated questionnaires; respiratory tests at the 3-month follow-up. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The cohort included 172 patients, mostly males (67.4%) with a median (25th-75th percentile) age of 61.0 years (52.8-67.0 yr). The median number of days at the ICU was 11.0 (6.00-24.0), and 51.7% of the patients received invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). According to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), 60.5% presented poor sleep quality 3 months after hospital discharge, which was further confirmed by actigraphy. Female sex was associated with an increased score in the PSQI (p < 0.05) and IMV during ICU stay was able to predict a higher fragmentation of the rest-activity rhythm at the 3-month follow-up (p < 0.001). Furthermore, compromised mental health measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was associated with poor sleep quality (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the importance of considering sleep and circadian health after hospital discharge. Within this context, IMV during the ICU stay could aid in predicting an increased fragmentation of the rest-activity rhythm at the 3-month follow-up. Furthermore, compromised mental health could be a marker for sleep disruption at the post-COVID period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Patient Discharge , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Sleep , Survivors
9.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 756517, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703379

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pathophysiology of COVID-19-related critical illness is not completely understood. Here, we analyzed the microRNA (miRNA) profile of bronchial aspirate (BAS) samples from COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU to identify prognostic biomarkers of fatal outcomes and to define molecular pathways involved in the disease and adverse events. METHODS: Two patient populations were included (n = 89): (i) a study population composed of critically ill COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients; (ii) a prospective study cohort composed of COVID-19 survivors and non-survivors among patients assisted by invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). BAS samples were obtained by bronchoaspiration during the ICU stay. The miRNA profile was analyzed using RT-qPCR. Detailed biomarker and bioinformatics analyses were performed. RESULTS: The deregulation in five miRNA ratios (miR-122-5p/miR-199a-5p, miR-125a-5p/miR-133a-3p, miR-155-5p/miR-486-5p, miR-214-3p/miR-222-3p, and miR-221-3p/miR-27a-3p) was observed when COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients were compared. In addition, five miRNA ratios segregated between ICU survivors and nonsurvivors (miR-1-3p/miR-124-3p, miR-125b-5p/miR-34a-5p, miR-126-3p/miR-16-5p, miR-199a-5p/miR-9-5p, and miR-221-3p/miR-491-5p). Through multivariable analysis, we constructed a miRNA ratio-based prediction model for ICU mortality that optimized the best combination of miRNA ratios (miR-125b-5p/miR-34a-5p, miR-199a-5p/miR-9-5p, and miR-221-3p/miR-491-5p). The model (AUC 0.85) and the miR-199a-5p/miR-9-5p ratio (AUC 0.80) showed an optimal discrimination value and outperformed the best clinical predictor for ICU mortality (days from first symptoms to IMV initiation, AUC 0.73). The survival analysis confirmed the usefulness of the miRNA ratio model and the individual ratio to identify patients at high risk of fatal outcomes following IMV initiation. Functional enrichment analyses identified pathological mechanisms implicated in fibrosis, coagulation, viral infections, immune responses and inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 induces a specific miRNA signature in BAS from critically ill patients. In addition, specific miRNA ratios in BAS samples hold individual and collective potential to improve risk-based patient stratification following IMV initiation in COVID-19-related critical illness. The biological role of the host miRNA profiles may allow a better understanding of the different pathological axes of the disease.

10.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-316534

ABSTRACT

Background: . Some patients who had previously presented with COVID-19 have been reported to develop persistent COVID-19 symptoms. Whilst this information has been adequately recognised and extensively published with respect to non-critically ill patients, less is known about the prevalence and risk factors and characteristics of persistent COVID_19 . On other hand these patients have very often intensive care unit-acquired pneumonia (ICUAP). A second infectious hit after COVID increases the length of ICU stay and mechanical ventilation and could have an influence in the poor health post-Covid 19 syndrome in ICU discharged patients Methods: This prospective, multicentre and observational study was done across 40 selected ICUs in Spain. Consecutive patients with COVID-19 requiring ICU admission were recruited and evaluated three months after hospital discharge. Results: A total of 1,255 ICU patients were scheduled to be followed up at 3 months;however, the final cohort comprised 991 (78.9%) patients. A total of 315 patients developed ICUAP (97% of them had ventilated ICUAP) Patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation had persistent, post-COVID-19 symptoms than those who did not require mechanical ventilation. Female sex, duration of ICU stay, and development of ICUAP were independent risk factors for persistent poor health post-COVID-19. Conclusions: : Persistent, post-COVID-19 symptoms occurred in more than two-thirds of patients. Female sex, duration of ICU stay and the onset of ICUAP comprised all independent risk factors for persistent poor health post-COVID-19. Prevention of ICUAP could have beneficial effects in poor health post-Covid 19

13.
J Clin Med ; 11(1)2021 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580629

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Some patients previously presenting with COVID-19 have been reported to develop persistent COVID-19 symptoms. While this information has been adequately recognised and extensively published with respect to non-critically ill patients, less is known about the incidence and factors associated with the characteristics of persistent COVID-19. On the other hand, these patients very often have intensive care unit-acquired pneumonia (ICUAP). A second infectious hit after COVID increases the length of ICU stay and mechanical ventilation and could have an influence on poor health post-COVID 19 syndrome in ICU-discharged patients. METHODS: This prospective, multicentre, and observational study was carrid out across 40 selected ICUs in Spain. Consecutive patients with COVID-19 requiring ICU admission were recruited and evaluated three months after hospital discharge. RESULTS: A total of 1255 ICU patients were scheduled to be followed up at 3 months; however, the final cohort comprised 991 (78.9%) patients. A total of 315 patients developed ICUAP (97% of them had ventilated ICUAP). Patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation had more persistent post-COVID-19 symptoms than those who did not require mechanical ventilation. Female sex, duration of ICU stay, development of ICUAP, and ARDS were independent factors for persistent poor health post-COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Persistent post-COVID-19 symptoms occurred in more than two-thirds of patients. Female sex, duration of ICU stay, development of ICUAP, and ARDS all comprised independent factors for persistent poor health post-COVID-19. Prevention of ICUAP could have beneficial effects in poor health post-COVID-19.

15.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258918, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496517

ABSTRACT

The objective was to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of hospitalized COVID-19 patients during the two different epidemic periods. Prospective, observational, cohort study of hospitalized COVID-19. A total of 421 consecutive patients were included, 188 during the first period (March-May 2020) and 233 in the second wave (July-December 2020). Clinical, epidemiological, prognostic and therapeutic data were compared. Patients of the first outbreak were older and more comorbid, presented worse PaO2/FiO2 ratio and an increased creatinine and D-dimer levels at hospital admission. The hospital stay was shorter (14.5[8;29] vs 8[6;14] days, p<0.001), ICU admissions (31.9% vs 13.3%, p<0.001) and the number of patients who required mechanical ventilation (OR = 0.12 [0.05-10.26]; p<0.001) were reduced. There were no significant differences in hospital and 30-day after discharge mortality (adjusted HR = 1.56; p = 0.1056) or hospital readmissions. New treatments and clinical strategies appear to improve hospital length, ICU admissions and the requirement for mechanical ventilation. However, we did not observe differences in mortality or readmissions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Epidemics/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial/mortality , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spain/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome
16.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 331, 2021 09 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1413915

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mortality due to COVID-19 is high, especially in patients requiring mechanical ventilation. The purpose of the study is to investigate associations between mortality and variables measured during the first three days of mechanical ventilation in patients with COVID-19 intubated at ICU admission. METHODS: Multicenter, observational, cohort study includes consecutive patients with COVID-19 admitted to 44 Spanish ICUs between February 25 and July 31, 2020, who required intubation at ICU admission and mechanical ventilation for more than three days. We collected demographic and clinical data prior to admission; information about clinical evolution at days 1 and 3 of mechanical ventilation; and outcomes. RESULTS: Of the 2,095 patients with COVID-19 admitted to the ICU, 1,118 (53.3%) were intubated at day 1 and remained under mechanical ventilation at day three. From days 1 to 3, PaO2/FiO2 increased from 115.6 [80.0-171.2] to 180.0 [135.4-227.9] mmHg and the ventilatory ratio from 1.73 [1.33-2.25] to 1.96 [1.61-2.40]. In-hospital mortality was 38.7%. A higher increase between ICU admission and day 3 in the ventilatory ratio (OR 1.04 [CI 1.01-1.07], p = 0.030) and creatinine levels (OR 1.05 [CI 1.01-1.09], p = 0.005) and a lower increase in platelet counts (OR 0.96 [CI 0.93-1.00], p = 0.037) were independently associated with a higher risk of death. No association between mortality and the PaO2/FiO2 variation was observed (OR 0.99 [CI 0.95 to 1.02], p = 0.47). CONCLUSIONS: Higher ventilatory ratio and its increase at day 3 is associated with mortality in patients with COVID-19 receiving mechanical ventilation at ICU admission. No association was found in the PaO2/FiO2 variation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Ventilation-Perfusion Ratio/physiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cohort Studies , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/trends , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Intensive Care Units/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Pulmonary Ventilation/physiology , Respiration, Artificial/trends , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , Spain/epidemiology
18.
Chest ; 160(1): 187-198, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290546

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: More than 20% of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 demonstrate ARDS requiring ICU admission. The long-term respiratory sequelae in such patients remain unclear. RESEARCH QUESTION: What are the major long-term pulmonary sequelae in critical patients who survive COVID-19? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Consecutive patients with COVID-19 requiring ICU admission were recruited and evaluated 3 months after hospitalization discharge. The follow-up comprised symptom and quality of life, anxiety and depression questionnaires, pulmonary function tests, exercise test (6-min walking test [6MWT]), and chest CT imaging. RESULTS: One hundred twenty-five patients admitted to the ICU with ARDS secondary to COVID-19 were recruited between March and June 2020. At the 3-month follow-up, 62 patients were available for pulmonary evaluation. The most frequent symptoms were dyspnea (46.7%) and cough (34.4%). Eighty-two percent of patients showed a lung diffusing capacity of less than 80%. The median distance in the 6MWT was 400 m (interquartile range, 362-440 m). CT scans showed abnormal results in 70.2% of patients, demonstrating reticular lesions in 49.1% and fibrotic patterns in 21.1%. Patients with more severe alterations on chest CT scan showed worse pulmonary function and presented more degrees of desaturation in the 6MWT. Factors associated with the severity of lung damage on chest CT scan were age and length of invasive mechanical ventilation during the ICU stay. INTERPRETATION: Three months after hospital discharge, pulmonary structural abnormalities and functional impairment are highly prevalent in patients with ARDS secondary to COVID-19 who required an ICU stay. Pulmonary evaluation should be considered for all critical COVID-19 survivors 3 months after discharge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Long Term Adverse Effects , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Quality of Life , Respiratory Function Tests/methods , Survivors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Aftercare/methods , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Long Term Adverse Effects/diagnosis , Long Term Adverse Effects/epidemiology , Long Term Adverse Effects/etiology , Long Term Adverse Effects/psychology , Lung/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Survivors/psychology , Survivors/statistics & numerical data , Walk Test/methods , Walk Test/statistics & numerical data
19.
Transl Res ; 236: 147-159, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243239

ABSTRACT

We aimed to examine the circulating microRNA (miRNA) profile of hospitalized COVID-19 patients and evaluate its potential as a source of biomarkers for the management of the disease. This was an observational and multicenter study that included 84 patients with a positive nasopharyngeal swab Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for SARS-CoV-2 recruited during the first pandemic wave in Spain (March-June 2020). Patients were stratified according to disease severity: hospitalized patients admitted to the clinical wards without requiring critical care and patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). An additional study was completed including ICU nonsurvivors and survivors. Plasma miRNA profiling was performed using reverse transcription polymerase quantitative chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Predictive models were constructed using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression. Ten circulating miRNAs were dysregulated in ICU patients compared to ward patients. LASSO analysis identified a signature of three miRNAs (miR-148a-3p, miR-451a and miR-486-5p) that distinguishes between ICU and ward patients [AUC (95% CI) = 0.89 (0.81-0.97)]. Among critically ill patients, six miRNAs were downregulated between nonsurvivors and survivors. A signature based on two miRNAs (miR-192-5p and miR-323a-3p) differentiated ICU nonsurvivors from survivors [AUC (95% CI) = 0.80 (0.64-0.96)]. The discriminatory potential of the signature was higher than that observed for laboratory parameters such as leukocyte counts, C-reactive protein (CRP) or D-dimer [maximum AUC (95% CI) for these variables = 0.73 (0.55-0.92)]. miRNA levels were correlated with the duration of ICU stay. Specific circulating miRNA profiles are associated with the severity of COVID-19. Plasma miRNA signatures emerge as a novel tool to assist in the early prediction of vital status deterioration among ICU patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/genetics , Circulating MicroRNA/blood , Hospitalization , Severity of Illness Index , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/virology , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
20.
RNA Biol ; 18(5): 688-695, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1061120

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 emergency pandemic resulting from infection with SARS-CoV-2 represents a major threat to public health worldwide. There is an urgent clinical demand for easily accessible tools to address weaknesses and gaps in the management of COVID-19 patients. In this context, transcriptomic profiling of liquid biopsies, especially microRNAs (miRNAs), has recently emerged as a robust source of potential clinical indicators for medical decision-making. Nevertheless, the analysis of the circulating miRNA signature and its translation to clinical practice requires strict control of a wide array of methodological details. In this review, we indicate the main methodological aspects that should be addressed when evaluating the circulating miRNA profiles in COVID-19 patients, from preanalytical and analytical variables to the experimental design, impact of confounding, analysis of the data and interpretation of the findings, among others. Additionally, we provide practice points to ensure the rigour and reproducibility of miRNA-based biomarker investigations of this condition.Abbreviations: ACE: angiotensin-converting enzyme; ARDS: acute respiratory distress syndrome; COVID-19: coronavirus disease 2019; ERDN: early Detection Research Network; LMWH: low molecular weight heparin; miRNA: microRNA; ncRNA: noncoding RNA; SARS-CoV-2: severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2; SOP: standard operating procedure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , MicroRNAs/blood , MicroRNAs/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/virology , Gene Expression Profiling/standards , Genetic Markers , Humans , Liquid Biopsy/methods , Liquid Biopsy/standards , MicroRNAs/isolation & purification , Pandemics , Virus Inactivation
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