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1.
Brain Behav ; 11(4): e02058, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1092509

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) might present neurological symptoms. We aimed to evaluate the frequency of them at the moment of emergency department (ED) visit and their impact in the prognosis. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study including all consecutive hospitalized cases between March 8th and April 11th, 2020. Covid-19 diagnosis was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction test and/or serology. We compared, in patients with and without neurological symptoms on admission, demographic, clinical presentation, and frequency and type of abnormal laboratory values. We analyzed the variables that were associated with in-hospital all-cause mortality by Cox-regression log-rank test. RESULTS: We included 576 hospitalized patients, 250 (43.3%) female, aged 67.2 years. At the moment of ED visit, 320 (55.6%) described neurological symptoms, including anosmia (146, 25.3%), myalgia (139, 24.1%), headache (137, 23.8%), and altered mental status (98, 17.0%). Neurological symptoms started the first symptomatic day in 198 (54.2%) cases. Patients with neurological symptoms presented later to the ED (7.9 versus. 6.6 days, p = .019). Only four (0.6%) cases had no typical Covid-19 general symptoms, and only six (1.9%) had a normal laboratory results, for a sensitivity of 98.7% (95% confidence interval (CI): 96.6%-99.6%) and 98.1% (95% CI: 95.7%-99.2%), respectively. In the multivariate Cox-regression of mortality predictors, anosmia (HR: 0.358, 95%CI: 0.140-0.916) and altered mental status (HR: 1.867, 95%CI: 1.162-3.001) were significant. CONCLUSION: Neurological symptoms were the most frequent extrapulmonary symptoms. They were present in half of the Covid-19 patients at the time of the ED visit. Anosmia on admission was an independent predictor of lower in-hospital mortality and altered mental status on admission predicted in-hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/psychology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , Spain/epidemiology
2.
BMC Neurol ; 21(1): 43, 2021 Jan 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054807

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with a small but clinically significant risk of stroke, the cause of which is frequently cryptogenic. In a large multinational cohort of consecutive COVID-19 patients with stroke, we evaluated clinical predictors of cryptogenic stroke, short-term functional outcomes and in-hospital mortality among patients according to stroke etiology. METHODS: We explored clinical characteristics and short-term outcomes of consecutively evaluated patients 18 years of age or older with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from 31 hospitals in 4 countries (3/1/20-6/16/20). RESULTS: Of the 14.483 laboratory-confirmed patients with COVID-19, 156 (1.1%) were diagnosed with AIS. Sixty-one (39.4%) were female, 84 (67.2%) white, and 88 (61.5%) were between 60 and 79 years of age. The most frequently reported etiology of AIS was cryptogenic (55/129, 42.6%), which was associated with significantly higher white blood cell count, c-reactive protein, and D-dimer levels than non-cryptogenic AIS patients (p

Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hospital Mortality , Ischemic Stroke/virology , Registries , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brain Ischemia , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , Cohort Studies , Computed Tomography Angiography , Egypt/epidemiology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/blood , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Stroke , United States/epidemiology
3.
J Headache Pain ; 21(1): 94, 2020 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021357

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Headache is one of the most frequent neurologic manifestations in COVID-19. We aimed to analyze which symptoms and laboratory abnormalities were associated with the presence of headache and to evaluate if patients with headache had a higher adjusted in-hospital risk of mortality. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study. We included all consecutive patients admitted to the Hospital with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection between March 8th and April 11th, 2020. We collected demographic data, clinical variables and laboratory abnormalities. We used multivariate regression analysis. RESULTS: During the study period, 576 patients were included, aged 67.2 (SD: 14.7), and 250/576 (43.3%) being female. Presence of headache was described by 137 (23.7%) patients. The all-cause in-hospital mortality rate was 127/576 (20.0%). In the multivariate analysis, patients with headache had a lower risk of mortality (OR: 0.39, 95% CI: 0.17-0.88, p = 0.007). After adjusting for multiple comparisons in a multivariate analysis, variables that were independently associated with a higher odds of having headache in COVID-19 patients were anosmia, myalgia, female sex and fever; variables that were associated with a lower odds of having headache were younger age, lower score on modified Rankin scale, and, regarding laboratory variables on admission, increased C-reactive protein, abnormal platelet values, lymphopenia and increased D-dimer. CONCLUSION: Headache is a frequent symptom in COVID-19 patients and its presence is an independent predictor of lower risk of mortality in COVID-19 hospitalized patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Headache/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Headache/etiology , Headache/mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate
4.
J Neurol Sci ; 419: 117163, 2020 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807032

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anosmia is common in Coronavirus disease 2019, but its impact on prognosis is unknown. We analysed whether anosmia predicts in-hospital mortality; and if patients with anosmia have a different clinical presentation, inflammatory response, or disease severity. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study including all consecutive hospitalized patients with confirmed Covid-19 from March 8th to April 11th, 2020. We determined all-cause mortality and need of intensive care unit (ICU) admission. We registered the first and worst laboratory parameters. Statistical analysis was done by multivariate logistic and linear regression. RESULTS: We included 576 patients, 43.3% female, and aged 67.2 years in mean. Anosmia was present in 146 (25.3%) patients. Patients with anosmia were more frequently females, younger and less disabled and had less frequently hypertension, diabetes, smoking habit, cardiac and neurological comorbidities. Anosmia was independently associated with lower mortality (OR: 0.180, 95% CI: 0.069-0.472) and ICU admission (OR: 0.438, 95% CI: 0.229-0.838, p = 0.013). In the multivariate analysis, patients with anosmia had a higher frequency of cough (OR: 1.96, 95%CI: 1.18-3.28), headache (OR: 2.58, 95% CI: 1.66-4.03), and myalgia (OR: 1.74, 95% CI: 1.12-2.71). They had higher adjusted values of hemoglobin (+0.87, 95% CI: 0.40-1.34), lymphocytes (+849.24, 95% CI: 157.45-1541.04), glomerular filtration rate (+6.42, 95% CI: 2.14-10.71), and lower D-dimer (-4886.52, 95% CI: -8655.29-(-1117.75)), and C-reactive protein (-24.92, 95% CI: -47.35-(-2.48)). CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalized Covid-19 patients with anosmia had a lower adjusted mortality rate and less severe course of the disease. This could be related to a distinct clinical presentation and a different inflammatory response.


Subject(s)
Anosmia/etiology , COVID-19/mortality , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Testing , Comorbidity , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Regression Analysis , Retrospective Studies
5.
Int J Stroke ; 16(4): 437-447, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-806135

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been associated with a significant risk of thrombotic events in critically ill patients. AIM: To summarize the findings of a multinational observational cohort of patients with SARS-CoV-2 and cerebrovascular disease. METHODS: Retrospective observational cohort of consecutive adults evaluated in the emergency department and/or admitted with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) across 31 hospitals in four countries (1 February 2020-16 June 2020). The primary outcome was the incidence rate of cerebrovascular events, inclusive of acute ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhages (ICH), and cortical vein and/or sinus thrombosis (CVST). RESULTS: Of the 14,483 patients with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2, 172 were diagnosed with an acute cerebrovascular event (1.13% of cohort; 1130/100,000 patients, 95%CI 970-1320/100,000), 68/171 (40.5%) were female and 96/172 (55.8%) were between the ages 60 and 79 years. Of these, 156 had acute ischemic stroke (1.08%; 1080/100,000 95%CI 920-1260/100,000), 28 ICH (0.19%; 190/100,000 95%CI 130-280/100,000), and 3 with CVST (0.02%; 20/100,000, 95%CI 4-60/100,000). The in-hospital mortality rate for SARS-CoV-2-associated stroke was 38.1% and for ICH 58.3%. After adjusting for clustering by site and age, baseline stroke severity, and all predictors of in-hospital mortality found in univariate regression (p < 0.1: male sex, tobacco use, arrival by emergency medical services, lower platelet and lymphocyte counts, and intracranial occlusion), cryptogenic stroke mechanism (aOR 5.01, 95%CI 1.63-15.44, p < 0.01), older age (aOR 1.78, 95%CI 1.07-2.94, p = 0.03), and lower lymphocyte count on admission (aOR 0.58, 95%CI 0.34-0.98, p = 0.04) were the only independent predictors of mortality among patients with stroke and COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 is associated with a small but significant risk of clinically relevant cerebrovascular events, particularly ischemic stroke. The mortality rate is high for COVID-19-associated cerebrovascular complications; therefore, aggressive monitoring and early intervention should be pursued to mitigate poor outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Cerebrovascular Disorders/etiology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/therapy , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Thrombosis/etiology , Tobacco Use , Young Adult
6.
Front Neurol ; 11: 781, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-686052

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Prognosis of Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) patients with vascular risk factors, and certain comorbidities is worse. The impact of chronic neurological disorders (CND) on prognosis is unclear. We evaluated if the presence of CND in Covid-19 patients is a predictor of a higher in-hospital mortality. As secondary endpoints, we analyzed the association between CND, Covid-19 severity, and laboratory abnormalities during admission. Methods: Retrospective cohort study that included all the consecutive hospitalized patients with confirmed Covid-19 disease from March 8th to April 11th, 2020. The study setting was Hospital Clínico, tertiary academic hospital from Valladolid. CND was defined as those neurological conditions causing permanent disability. We assessed demography, clinical variables, Covid-19 severity, laboratory parameters and outcome. The primary endpoint was in-hospital all-cause mortality, evaluated by multivariate cox-regression log rank test. We analyzed the association between CND, covid-19 severity and laboratory abnormalities. Results: We included 576 patients, 43.3% female, aged 67.2 years in mean. CND were present in 105 (18.3%) patients. Patients with CND were older, more disabled, had more vascular risk factors and comorbidities and fewer clinical symptoms of Covid-19. They presented 1.43 days earlier to the emergency department. Need of ventilation support was similar. Presence of CND was an independent predictor of death (HR 2.129, 95% CI: 1.382-3.280) but not a severer Covid-19 disease (OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 0.970-3.158). Frequency of laboratory abnormalities was similar, except for procalcitonin and INR. Conclusions: The presence of CND is an independent predictor of mortality in hospitalized Covid-19 patients. That was not explained neither by a worse immune response to Covid-19 nor by differences in the level of care received by patients with CND.

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