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1.
J Clin Med ; 11(15)2022 Jul 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1969311

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of co/superinfection in patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is challenging. The FilmArray Pneumonia plus Panel (bioMérieux, France), a new rapid multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (mPCR), has never been assessed on a blinded protected telescope catheter (PTC) samples, a very common diagnostic tool in patients under mechanical ventilation. We evaluated the performance of mPCR on PTC samples compared with conventional culture and its impact on antibiotic stewardship. METHODS: Observational study in two intensive care units, conducted between March and July 2020, during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in France. RESULTS: We performed 125 mPCR on blinded PTC samples of 95 ARDS patients, including 73 (77%) SARS-CoV-2 cases and 28 (29%) requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Respiratory samples were drawn from mechanically ventilated patients either just after intubation (n = 48; 38%) or later for suspected ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) (n = 77; 62%). The sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values of mPCR were 93% (95% CI 84-100), 99% (95% CI 99-100), 68% (95% CI 54-83), and 100% (95% CI 100-100), respectively. The overall coefficient of agreement between mPCR and standard culture was 0.80 (95% CI 0.68-0.89). Intensivists changed empirical antimicrobial therapy in only 14% (18/125) of cases. No new antibiotic was initiated in more than half of the CAP/HAP pneumonia-suspected cases (n = 29; 60%) and in more than one-third of those suspected to have VAP without affecting or delaying their antimicrobial therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Rapid mPCR was feasible on blinded PTC with good sensitivity and specificity. New antibiotics were not initiated in more than half of patients and more than one-third of VAP-suspected cases. Further studies are needed to assess mPCR potential in improving antibiotic stewardship.

2.
Viruses ; 14(7)2022 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1939016

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 variant of concern, α, spread worldwide at the beginning of 2021. It was suggested that this variant was associated with a higher risk of mortality than other variants. We aimed to characterize the genetic diversity of SARS-CoV-2 variants isolated from patients with severe COVID-19 and unravel the relationships between specific viral mutations/mutational patterns and clinical outcomes. This is a prospective multicenter observational cohort study. Patients aged ≥18 years admitted to 11 intensive care units (ICUs) in hospitals in the Greater Paris area for SARS-CoV-2 infection and acute respiratory failure between 1 October 2020 and 30 May 2021 were included. The primary clinical endpoint was day-28 mortality. Full-length SARS-CoV-2 genomes were sequenced by means of next-generation sequencing (Illumina COVIDSeq). In total, 413 patients were included, 183 (44.3%) were infected with pre-existing variants, 197 (47.7%) were infected with variant α, and 33 (8.0%) were infected with other variants. The patients infected with pre-existing variants were significantly older (64.9 ± 11.9 vs. 60.5 ± 11.8 years; p = 0.0005) and had more frequent COPD (11.5% vs. 4.1%; p = 0.009) and higher SOFA scores (4 [3-8] vs. 3 [2-4]; 0.0002). The day-28 mortality was no different between the patients infected with pre-existing, α, or other variants (31.1% vs. 26.2% vs. 30.3%; p = 0.550). There was no association between day-28 mortality and specific variants or the presence of specific mutations. At ICU admission, the patients infected with pre-existing variants had a different clinical presentation from those infected with variant α, but mortality did not differ between these groups. There was no association between specific variants or SARS-CoV-2 genome mutational pattern and day-28 mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Critical Illness , Genomics , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
3.
Crit Care ; 26(1): 185, 2022 06 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1894496

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Whether targeting the driving pressure (∆P) when adjusting the tidal volume in mechanically ventilated patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may decrease the risk of ventilator-induced lung injury remains a matter of research. In this study, we assessed the effect of a ∆P-guided ventilation on the mechanical power. METHODS: We prospectively included adult patients with moderate-to-severe ARDS. Positive end expiratory pressure was set by the attending physician and kept constant during the study. Tidal volume was first adjusted to target 6 ml/kg of predicted body weight (PBW-guided ventilation) and subsequently modified within a range from 4 to 10 ml/kg PBW to target a ∆P between 12 and 14 cm H2O. The respiratory rate was then re-adjusted within a range from 12 to 40 breaths/min until EtCO2 returned to its baseline value (∆P-guided ventilation). Mechanical power was computed at each step. RESULTS: Fifty-one patients were included between December 2019 and May 2021. ∆P-guided ventilation was feasible in all but one patient. The ∆P during PBW-guided ventilation was already within the target range of ∆P-guided ventilation in five (10%) patients, above in nine (18%) and below in 36 (72%). The change from PBW- to ∆P-guided ventilation was thus accompanied by an overall increase in tidal volume from 6.1 mL/kg PBW [5.9-6.2] to 7.7 ml/kg PBW [6.2-8.7], while respiratory rate was decreased from 29 breaths/min [26-32] to 21 breaths/min [16-28] (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). ∆P-guided ventilation was accompanied by a significant decrease in mechanical power from 31.5 J/min [28-35.7] to 28.8 J/min [24.6-32.6] (p < 0.001), representing a relative decrease of 7% [0-16]. With ∆P-guided ventilation, the PaO2/FiO2 ratio increased and the ventilatory ratio decreased. CONCLUSION: As compared to a conventional PBW-guided ventilation, a ∆P-guided ventilation strategy targeting a ∆P between 12 and 14 cm H2O required to change the tidal volume in 90% of the patients. Such ∆P-guided ventilation significantly reduced the mechanical power. Whether this physiological observation could be associated with clinical benefit should be assessed in clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Adult , Body Weight , Humans , Lung , Positive-Pressure Respiration , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Tidal Volume/physiology
5.
J Clin Med ; 11(7)2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776266

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in patients with COVID-19, however, its mechanism is still controversial, particularly in ICU settings. Urinary proteinuria profile could be a non-invasive tool of interest to scrutinize the pathophysiological process underlying AKI in COVID-19 patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study between March 2020 and April 2020. All patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 and without end-stage kidney disease requiring renal replacement therapy before ICU admission were included. Our objectives were to assess the incidence and risk factors for AKI and to describe its clinical and biological characteristics, particularly its urinary protein profile. RESULTS: Seventy patients were included; 87% needed mechanical ventilation and 61% needed vasopressor during their ICU stay; 64.3% of patients developed AKI and half of them needed dialysis. Total and tubular proteinuria on day 1 were higher in patients with AKI, whereas glomerular proteinuria was similar in both groups. The main risk factor for AKI was shock at admission (OR = 5.47 (1.74-17.2), p < 0.01). Mortality on day 28 was higher in AKI (23/45, 51.1%) than in no-AKI patients (1/25, 4%), p < 0.001. Risk factors for 28-days mortality were AKI with need for renal replacement therapy, non-renal SOFA score and history of congestive heart failure. CONCLUSIONS: AKI is common in COVID-19 patients hospitalized in ICU; it seems to be related to tubular lesions rather than glomerular injury and is related to shock at ICU admission.

6.
Res Sq ; 2022 Jan 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1766249

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection fatality rate (IFR) doubles with every five years of age from childhood onward. Circulating autoantibodies neutralizing IFN-α, IFN-ω, and/or IFN-ß are found in ~20% of deceased patients across age groups. In the general population, they are found in ~1% of individuals aged 20-70 years and in >4% of those >70 years old. With a sample of 1,261 deceased patients and 34,159 uninfected individuals, we estimated both IFR and relative risk of death (RRD) across age groups for individuals carrying autoantibodies neutralizing type I IFNs, relative to non-carriers. For autoantibodies neutralizing IFN-α2 or IFN-ω, the RRD was 17.0[95% CI:11.7-24.7] for individuals under 70 years old and 5.8[4.5-7.4] for individuals aged 70 and over, whereas, for autoantibodies neutralizing both molecules, the RRD was 188.3[44.8-774.4] and 7.2[5.0-10.3], respectively. IFRs increased with age, from 0.17%[0.12-0.31] for individuals <40 years old to 26.7%[20.3-35.2] for those ≥80 years old for autoantibodies neutralizing IFN-α2 or IFN-ω, and from 0.84%[0.31-8.28] to 40.5%[27.82-61.20] for the same two age groups, for autoantibodies neutralizing both molecules. Autoantibodies against type I IFNs increase IFRs, and are associated with high RRDs, particularly those neutralizing both IFN-α2 and -ω. Remarkably, IFR increases with age, whereas RRD decreases with age. Autoimmunity to type I IFNs appears to be second only to age among common predictors of COVID-19 death.

7.
Research in Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging ; 1:1-5, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1671093

ABSTRACT

Purpose To evaluate and compare the prevalence and type of abdominal involvements identified on CT scans in COVID-19 critically ill patients to those observed in critically ill patients with non-SARS-CoV-2 viral pneumonia. Methods Monocentric IRB approved retrospective study comparing all abdominal CT scans performed for patients admitted in the ICU with COVID-19 and those performed in a historical cohort of ICU patients with non-SARS-CoV-2 viral pneumonia. For each patient, gallbladder abnormality, acute pancreatitis signs, acute adrenal infarction, renal infarcts, bowel wall thickening and CT scan signs of bowel ischemia were assessed. Results were then compared between critically ill COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients (Chi-2 or Fisher exact tests for categorical data and Student t-test or Mann-Whitney U test for continuous data as appropriate). Results Ninety-nine COVID-19 patients and 45 non-COVID-19 patients were included. No difference was found between the rate of abnormal findings comparing COVID-19 patients and patients with other viral pneumonia (63/99 [64%] vs 27/45 [61%], p=0.94). Acute pancreatitis signs were more commonly seen in COVID-19 patients but without statistically difference between groups (14/99 [14%] vs 3/45 [6.7%], p=0.31). Bowel wall thickening was slightly more commonly seen in patients with other viral pneumonia (18/99 [18%] vs 11/45 [24%], p=0.52), however ischemic features were observed in higher rate in the COVID-19 group, although without reaching statistically significant differences (7/99 [7.1%] vs 2/45 [4.4%], p=0.75). Conclusion The rate and severity of abdominal involvement demonstrated by CT in ICU patients hospitalized for COVID-19 although high were not different to that observed in patients with other severe viral pneumoniae

8.
Lancet Respir Med ; 10(2): 180-190, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537209

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with severe COVID-19 have emerged as a population at high risk of invasive fungal infections (IFIs). However, to our knowledge, the prevalence of IFIs has not yet been assessed in large populations of mechanically ventilated patients. We aimed to identify the prevalence, risk factors, and mortality associated with IFIs in mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19 under intensive care. METHODS: We performed a national, multicentre, observational cohort study in 18 French intensive care units (ICUs). We retrospectively and prospectively enrolled adult patients (aged ≥18 years) with RT-PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and requiring mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory distress syndrome, with all demographic and clinical and biological follow-up data anonymised and collected from electronic case report forms. Patients were systematically screened for respiratory fungal microorganisms once or twice a week during the period of mechanical ventilation up to ICU discharge. The primary outcome was the prevalence of IFIs in all eligible participants with a minimum of three microbiological samples screened during ICU admission, with proven or probable (pr/pb) COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA) classified according to the recent ECMM/ISHAM definitions. Secondary outcomes were risk factors of pr/pb CAPA, ICU mortality between the pr/pb CAPA and non-pr/pb CAPA groups, and associations of pr/pb CAPA and related variables with ICU mortality, identified by regression models. The MYCOVID study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04368221. FINDINGS: Between Feb 29 and July 9, 2020, we enrolled 565 mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19. 509 patients with at least three screening samples were analysed (mean age 59·4 years [SD 12·5], 400 [79%] men). 128 (25%) patients had 138 episodes of pr/pb or possible IFIs. 76 (15%) patients fulfilled the criteria for pr/pb CAPA. According to multivariate analysis, age older than 62 years (odds ratio [OR] 2·34 [95% CI 1·39-3·92], p=0·0013), treatment with dexamethasone and anti-IL-6 (OR 2·71 [1·12-6·56], p=0·027), and long duration of mechanical ventilation (>14 days; OR 2·16 [1·14-4·09], p=0·019) were independently associated with pr/pb CAPA. 38 (7%) patients had one or more other pr/pb IFIs: 32 (6%) had candidaemia, six (1%) had invasive mucormycosis, and one (<1%) had invasive fusariosis. Multivariate analysis of associations with death, adjusted for candidaemia, for the 509 patients identified three significant factors: age older than 62 years (hazard ratio [HR] 1·71 [95% CI 1·26-2·32], p=0·0005), solid organ transplantation (HR 2·46 [1·53-3·95], p=0·0002), and pr/pb CAPA (HR 1·45 [95% CI 1·03-2·03], p=0·033). At time of ICU discharge, survival curves showed that overall ICU mortality was significantly higher in patients with pr/pb CAPA than in those without, at 61·8% (95% CI 50·0-72·8) versus 32·1% (27·7-36·7; p<0·0001). INTERPRETATION: This study shows the high prevalence of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and candidaemia and high mortality associated with pr/pb CAPA in mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19. These findings highlight the need for active surveillance of fungal pathogens in patients with severe COVID-19. FUNDING: Pfizer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Aspergillosis , Adolescent , Adult , Child, Preschool , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Sci Immunol ; 6(62)2021 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434875

ABSTRACT

Circulating autoantibodies (auto-Abs) neutralizing high concentrations (10 ng/mL, in plasma diluted 1 to 10) of IFN-α and/or -ω are found in about 10% of patients with critical COVID-19 pneumonia, but not in subjects with asymptomatic infections. We detect auto-Abs neutralizing 100-fold lower, more physiological, concentrations of IFN-α and/or -ω (100 pg/mL, in 1/10 dilutions of plasma) in 13.6% of 3,595 patients with critical COVID-19, including 21% of 374 patients > 80 years, and 6.5% of 522 patients with severe COVID-19. These antibodies are also detected in 18% of the 1,124 deceased patients (aged 20 days-99 years; mean: 70 years). Moreover, another 1.3% of patients with critical COVID-19 and 0.9% of the deceased patients have auto-Abs neutralizing high concentrations of IFN-ß. We also show, in a sample of 34,159 uninfected subjects from the general population, that auto-Abs neutralizing high concentrations of IFN-α and/or -ω are present in 0.18% of individuals between 18 and 69 years, 1.1% between 70 and 79 years, and 3.4% >80 years. Moreover, the proportion of subjects carrying auto-Abs neutralizing lower concentrations is greater in a subsample of 10,778 uninfected individuals: 1% of individuals <70 years, 2.3% between 70 and 80 years, and 6.3% >80 years. By contrast, auto-Abs neutralizing IFN-ß do not become more frequent with age. Auto-Abs neutralizing type I IFNs predate SARS-CoV-2 infection and sharply increase in prevalence after the age of 70 years. They account for about 20% of both critical COVID-19 cases in the over-80s, and total fatal COVID-19 cases.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Autoantibodies/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Critical Illness , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interferon-alpha/immunology , Middle Aged , Young Adult
13.
Sci Immunol ; 6(62)2021 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367379

ABSTRACT

Circulating autoantibodies (auto-Abs) neutralizing high concentrations (10 ng/mL, in plasma diluted 1 to 10) of IFN-α and/or -ω are found in about 10% of patients with critical COVID-19 pneumonia, but not in subjects with asymptomatic infections. We detect auto-Abs neutralizing 100-fold lower, more physiological, concentrations of IFN-α and/or -ω (100 pg/mL, in 1/10 dilutions of plasma) in 13.6% of 3,595 patients with critical COVID-19, including 21% of 374 patients > 80 years, and 6.5% of 522 patients with severe COVID-19. These antibodies are also detected in 18% of the 1,124 deceased patients (aged 20 days-99 years; mean: 70 years). Moreover, another 1.3% of patients with critical COVID-19 and 0.9% of the deceased patients have auto-Abs neutralizing high concentrations of IFN-ß. We also show, in a sample of 34,159 uninfected subjects from the general population, that auto-Abs neutralizing high concentrations of IFN-α and/or -ω are present in 0.18% of individuals between 18 and 69 years, 1.1% between 70 and 79 years, and 3.4% >80 years. Moreover, the proportion of subjects carrying auto-Abs neutralizing lower concentrations is greater in a subsample of 10,778 uninfected individuals: 1% of individuals <70 years, 2.3% between 70 and 80 years, and 6.3% >80 years. By contrast, auto-Abs neutralizing IFN-ß do not become more frequent with age. Auto-Abs neutralizing type I IFNs predate SARS-CoV-2 infection and sharply increase in prevalence after the age of 70 years. They account for about 20% of both critical COVID-19 cases in the over-80s, and total fatal COVID-19 cases.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Autoantibodies/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Critical Illness , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interferon-alpha/immunology , Middle Aged , Young Adult
14.
Allergy ; 77(2): 595-608, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280270

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) has been associated with cutaneous findings, some being the result of drug hypersensitivity reactions such as maculopapular drug rashes (MDR). The aim of this study was to investigate whether COVID-19 may impact the development of the MDR. METHODS: Blood and skin samples from COVID-19 patients (based on a positive nasopharyngeal PCR) suffering from MDR (COVID-MDR), healthy controls, non-COVID-19-related patients with drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), and MDR were analyzed. We utilized imaging mass cytometry (IMC) to characterize the cellular infiltrate in skin biopsies. Furthermore, RNA sequencing transcriptome of skin biopsy samples and high-throughput multiplexed proteomic profiling of serum were performed. RESULTS: IMC revealed by clustering analyses a more prominent, phenotypically shifted cytotoxic CD8+ T cell population and highly activated monocyte/macrophage (Mo/Mac) clusters in COVID-MDR. The RNA sequencing transcriptome demonstrated a more robust cytotoxic response in COVID-MDR skin. However, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 was not detected in skin biopsies at the time point of MDR diagnosis. Serum proteomic profiling of COVID-MDR patients revealed upregulation of various inflammatory mediators (IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, TNF, and IFN-γ), eosinophil and Mo/Mac -attracting chemokines (MCP-2, MCP-3, MCP-4 and CCL11). Proteomics analyses demonstrated a massive systemic cytokine storm in COVID-MDR compared with the relatively milder cytokine storm observed in DRESS, while MDR did not exhibit such features. CONCLUSION: A systemic cytokine storm may promote activation of Mo/Mac and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in severe COVID-19 patients, which in turn may impact the development of MDR.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exanthema , Pharmaceutical Preparations , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes , Humans , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(3): e1009416, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156080

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is characterized by respiratory symptoms of various severities, ranging from mild upper respiratory signs to acute respiratory failure/acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with a high mortality rate. However, the pathophysiology of the disease is largely unknown. Shotgun metagenomics from nasopharyngeal swabs were used to characterize the genomic, metagenomic and transcriptomic features of patients from the first pandemic wave with various forms of COVID-19, including outpatients, patients hospitalized not requiring intensive care, and patients in the intensive care unit, to identify viral and/or host factors associated with the most severe forms of the disease. Neither the genetic characteristics of SARS-CoV-2, nor the detection of bacteria, viruses, fungi or parasites were associated with the severity of pulmonary disease. Severe pneumonia was associated with overexpression of cytokine transcripts activating the CXCR2 pathway, whereas patients with benign disease presented with a T helper "Th1-Th17" profile. The latter profile was associated with female gender and a lower mortality rate. Our findings indicate that the most severe cases of COVID-19 are characterized by the presence of overactive immune cells resulting in neutrophil pulmonary infiltration which, in turn, could enhance the inflammatory response and prolong tissue damage. These findings make CXCR2 antagonists, in particular IL-8 antagonists, promising candidates for the treatment of patients with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Genome, Viral , Metagenomics , SARS-CoV-2 , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/immunology , Transcriptome , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Receptors, Interleukin-8B/genetics , Receptors, Interleukin-8B/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
17.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 23, 2021 01 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1151679

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Biomarkers of disease severity might help individualizing the management of patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Whether the alveolar compartmentalization of biomarkers has a clinical significance in patients with pneumonia-related ARDS is unknown. This study aimed at assessing the interrelation of ARDS/sepsis biomarkers in the alveolar and blood compartments and explored their association with clinical outcomes. METHODS: Immunocompetent patients with pneumonia-related ARDS admitted between 2014 and 2018 were included in a prospective monocentric study. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and blood samples were obtained within 48 h of admission. Twenty-two biomarkers were quantified in BAL fluid and serum. HLA-DR+ monocytes and CD8+ PD-1+ lymphocytes were quantified using flow cytometry. The primary clinical endpoint of the study was hospital mortality. Patients undergoing a bronchoscopy as part of routine care were included as controls. RESULTS: Seventy ARDS patients were included. Hospital mortality was 21.4%. The BAL fluid-to-serum ratio of IL-8 was 20 times higher in ARDS patients than in controls (p < 0.0001). ARDS patients with shock had lower BAL fluid-to-serum ratio of IL-1Ra (p = 0.026), IL-6 (p = 0.002), IP-10/CXCL10 (p = 0.024) and IL-10 (p = 0.023) than others. The BAL fluid-to-serum ratio of IL-1Ra was more elevated in hospital survivors than decedents (p = 0.006), even after adjusting for SOFA and driving pressure (p = 0.036). There was no significant association between alveolar or alveolar/blood monocytic HLA-DR or CD8+ lymphocytes PD-1 expression and hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: IL-8 was the most compartmentalized cytokine and lower BAL fluid-to-serum concentration ratios of IL-1Ra were associated with hospital mortality in patients with pneumonia-associated ARDS.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/analysis , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , Pulmonary Alveoli/drug effects , Aged , Analysis of Variance , Biomarkers/blood , Bronchoalveolar Lavage/methods , Cohort Studies , Female , Flow Cytometry/methods , France , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/complications , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Statistics, Nonparametric
18.
Ann Intensive Care ; 11(1): 38, 2021 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115254

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We describe a frugal approach (focusing on needs, performance, and costs) to manage a massive influx of COVID-19 patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) using the Boussignac valve protected by a filter ("Filter Frugal CPAP", FF-CPAP) in and out the ICU. METHODS: (1) A bench study measured the impact of two filters with different mechanical properties on CPAP performances, and pressures were also measured in patients. (2) Non-ICU healthcare staff working in COVID-19 intermediate care units were trained with a video tutorial posted on a massive open online course. (3) A clinical study assessed the feasibility and safety of using FF-CPAP to maintain oxygenation and manage patients out of the ICU during a massive outbreak. RESULTS: Bench assessments showed that adding a filter did not affect the effective pressure delivered to the patient. The resistive load induced by the filter variably increased the simulated patient's work of breathing (6-34%) needed to sustain the tidal volume, depending on the filter's resistance, respiratory mechanics and basal inspiratory effort. In patients, FF-CPAP achieved pressures similar to those obtained on the bench. The massive training tool provided precious information on the use of Boussignac FF-CPAP on COVID-19 patients. Then 85 COVID-19 patients with ICU admission criteria over a 1-month period were studied upon FF-CPAP initiation for AHRF. FF-CPAP significantly decreased respiratory rate and increased SpO2. Thirty-six (43%) patients presented with respiratory indications for intubation prior to FF-CPAP initiation, and 13 (36%) of them improved without intubation. Overall, 31 patients (36%) improved with FF-CPAP alone and 17 patients (20%) did not require ICU admission. Patients with a respiratory rate > 32 breaths/min upon FF-CPAP initiation had a higher cumulative probability of intubation (p < 0.001 by log-rank test). CONCLUSION: Adding a filter to the Boussignac valve does not affect the delivered pressure but may variably increase the resistive load depending on the filter used. Clinical assessment suggests that FF-CPAP is a frugal solution to provide a ventilatory support and improve oxygenation to numerous patients suffering from AHRF in the context of a massive outbreak.

19.
J Clin Immunol ; 41(3): 536-544, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1092712

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To report four cases of life-threatening COVID-19 pneumonia in patients with high blood concentrations of neutralizing autoantibodies against type I interferons (IFNs), who were treated with plasma exchange (PE) as a rescue therapy. METHODS: Prospective case series, which included patients, diagnosed with RT-PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and positive autoantibodies against type I IFNs in two French intensive care units (ICUs) between October 8 and November 14, 2020. Six critically ill COVID-19 patients with no anti-IFN antibodies were used as controls. Anti-IFN autoantibodies and IFN concentrations, together with the levels of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, were measured sequentially in serum. Viral load was determined in the upper and lower respiratory tract. Patients were followed during hospital stay. RESULTS: Three men and one woman were included. Three of the patients had four PE sessions each, while another had three PE sessions. PE decreased the concentrations of autoantibodies against type I IFN in all four patients, whereas anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels remained stable. Autoantibodies against type I IFN levels were high in tracheal aspirates of one patient and decreased after three PE sessions. By contrast, anti-IFN autoantibodies were not detected in tracheal aspirates from five control patients without detectable anti-IFN autoantibodies in serum. During PE, serum IFN-α levels slightly increased in three out of four patients, and upper respiratory tract viral load decreased in all patients. All patients were alive at day 28 of ICU admission. Two patients eventually died in the ICU, while the two survivors were discharged from the ICU at days 50 and 66. CONCLUSIONS: PE efficiently removes autoantibodies against type I IFNs, including those detected in tracheal aspirates, without affecting anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels, in patients with life-threatening COVID-19 pneumonia. The clinical benefit of PE in patients with autoantibodies against type I IFNs should be tested in a larger study.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/blood , COVID-19/therapy , Interferon Type I/immunology , Plasma Exchange , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Autoantibodies/isolation & purification , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies
20.
J Intensive Care ; 9(1): 12, 2021 Jan 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067282

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sepsis is characterized by various hemodynamic alterations which could happen concomitantly in the heart, pulmonary and systemic circulations. A comprehensive demonstration of their interactions in the clinical setting of COVID-19 sepsis is lacking. This study aimed at evaluating the feasibility, clinical implications, and physiological coherence of the various indices of hemodynamic function and acute myocardial injury (AMI) in COVID-19 sepsis. METHODS: Hemodynamic and echocardiographic data of septic critically ill COVID-19 patients were prospectively recorded. A dozen hemodynamic indices exploring contractility and loading conditions were assessed. Several cardiac biomarkers were measured, and AMI was considered if serum concentration of high-sensitive troponin T (hs-TNT) was above the 99th percentile, upper reference. RESULTS: Sixty-seven patients were assessed (55 males), with a median age of 61 [50-70] years. Overall, the feasibility of echocardiographic parameters was very good, ranging from 93 to 100%. Hierarchical clustering method identified four coherent clusters involving cardiac preload, left ventricle (LV) contractility, LV afterload, and right ventricle (RV) function. LV contractility indices were not associated with preload indices, but some of them were positively correlated with RV function parameters and negatively correlated with a single LV afterload parameter. In most cases (n = 36, 54%), echocardiography results prompted therapeutic changes. Mortality was not influenced by the echocardiographic variables in multivariable analysis. Cardiac biomarkers' concentrations were most often increased with high incidence of AMI reaching 72%. hs-TNT was associated with mortality and inversely correlated with most of LV and RV contractility indices. CONCLUSIONS: In this comprehensive hemodynamic evaluation in critically ill COVID-19 septic patients, we identified four homogeneous and coherent clusters with a good feasibility. AMI was common and associated with alteration of LV and RV functions. Echocardiographic assessment had a clinical impact on patient management in most cases.

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