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1.
Infect Dis Now ; 52(1): 23-30, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1661845

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Strasbourg University Hospital faced an important COVID-19 first wave from early March 2020. We performed a longitudinal prospective cohort study to describe clinical and virological data, exposure history to COVID-19, and adherence to strict hygiene standards during the first pandemic wave in 1497 workers undergoing a SARS-CoV-2 serological test at our hospital, with a follow up of serology result three months later. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 1497 patients were enrolled from April 6 to May 7, 2020. Antibody response to SARS-CoV-2 was measured, and COVID-19 exposure routes were analyzed according to SARS-CoV-2 serological status. RESULTS: A total of 515 patients (34.4%) were seropositive, mainly medical students (13.2%) and assistant nurses (12.0%). A history of COVID-19 exposure in a professional and/or private setting was mentioned by 83.1% of seropositive subjects (P<0.05; odds ratio [OR]: 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.8-3.4). COVID-19 exposure factors associated with seropositive status were non-professional exposure (OR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.7), especially outside the immediate family circle (OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.2-3.9) and contact with a COVID-19 patient (OR: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.1-2.2). Among professionally exposed workers, systematic adherence to strict hygiene standards was well observed, except for the use of a surgical mask (P<0.05, OR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.8). Of those who reported occasionally or never wearing a surgical mask, nurses (25.7%), assistant nurses (16.2%), and medical students (11.7%) were predominant. CONCLUSION: Infection of staff members during the first pandemic wave in our hospital occurred after both professional and private COVID-19 exposure, underlining the importance of continuous training in strict hygiene standards.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Hospitals, University , Humans , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital , Prospective Studies
2.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3461-3466, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606253

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) or myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody-associated disease (MOGAD), often treated with immunosuppressive therapies, are still unknown. METHODS: We conducted a multicenter, retrospective, observational cohort study among all French expert centers for neuromyelitis optica and related disorders. Patients with NMOSD or MOGAD included in the study received a confirmed or highly suspected diagnosis of COVID-19 between 1 March 2020 and 30 June 2020. Main outcome was COVID-19 severity score assessed on a seven-point ordinal scale ranging from 1 (not hospitalized with no limitations on activities) to 7 (death). RESULTS: Fifteen cases (mean [SD] age: 39.3 [14.3] years, 11 female) were included. Five patients (33.3%) were hospitalized, all receiving rituximab. A 24-year-old patient with positive aquaporine-4 antibody, with obesity as comorbidity, needed mechanical ventilation. Outpatients were receiving anti-CD20 (5), mycophenolate mofetil (3) or azathioprine (3). They were younger (mean [SD] age: 37.0 [13.4] years), with a longer disease duration (mean [SD]: 8.3 [6.3] years) and had a lower expanded disability severity score (EDSS) score (median [range] EDSS: 2.5 [0-4]) relative to patients requiring hospitalization (mean [SD] age: 44.0 [16.4] years, mean [SD] disease duration: 5.8 [5.5] years, median [range] EDSS: 4 [0-6.5]). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 outcome was overall favorable in this cohort. Larger international studies are needed to identify risk factors of severe COVID-19; however, we recommend personal protective measures to reduce risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection in this immunocompromised population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neuromyelitis Optica , Adult , Aquaporin 4 , Female , Humans , Neuromyelitis Optica/drug therapy , Neuromyelitis Optica/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Rituximab , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
3.
Mult Scler ; : 13524585211049737, 2021 Dec 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582624

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Recent studies suggested that anti-CD20 and fingolimod may be associated with lower anti-spike protein-based immunoglobulin-G response following COVID-19 vaccination. We evaluated if COVID-19 occurred despite vaccination among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO), using the COVISEP registry. CASE SERIES: We report 18 cases of COVID-19 after two doses of BNT162b2-vaccination, 13 of which treated with anti-CD20 and four with fingolimod. COVID-19 severity was mild. DISCUSSION: These results reinforce the recommendation for a third COVID-19 vaccine dose among anti-CD20 treated patients and stress the need for a prospective clinical and biological study on COVID-19 vaccine efficacy among MS and NMO patients.

4.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-294752

ABSTRACT

Assessment of the kinetics of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies is essential in predicting protection against reinfection and durability of vaccine protection. Here, we longitudinally measured Spike (S) and Nucleocapsid (N)-specific antibodies in 1,309 healthcare workers (HCWs), including 916 COVID-19 negative HCWs and 393 convalescent COVID-19 for up to 422 days post-symptom. From month (M)1 to M7-9 post-infection, SARS-CoV-2 antibodies decreased moderately in convalescent HCWs in a biphasic model, with men showing a slower decay of anti-N (p=0.02), and a faster decay of anti-S (p=0.0008) than women. At M11-13, anti-N dramatically decreased (half-life: 283 days) while anti-S stabilized (half-life: 725 days) at a median of 2.39 log Arbitrary Units (AU)/mL (Interquartile Range (IQR): 2.10 -2.75). Overall, 69 SARS-CoV-2 infections developed in the COVID-19 negative group (incidence of 12.22 per 100 person-years) versus one in the COVID-19 positive group (incidence of 0.40 per 100 person-years), indicating a relative reduction in the incidence of SARS-CoV-2 reinfection of 96.7% (p<0.0001). Correlation with live-virus neutralization assay revealed that variants D614G and B.1.1.7, but not B.1.351, were sensitive to anti-S antibodies at 2.3 log AU/mL, while IgG ≥ 3 log AU/mL neutralized all three variants. After SARS-CoV-2 vaccination, anti-S levels reached at least 3 logs regardless of pre-vaccination IgG levels, type of vaccine, and number of doses. Our study demonstrates a long-term persistence of anti-S IgG antibodies that may protect against reinfection. By significantly increasing cross-neutralizing antibody titers, a single-dose vaccination strengthens protection against escape mutants.

5.
J Infect Dis ; 224(9): 1489-1499, 2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522216

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) induces a complex antibody response that varies by orders of magnitude between individuals and over time. METHODS: We developed a multiplex serological test for measuring antibodies to 5 SARS-CoV-2 antigens and the spike proteins of seasonal coronaviruses. We measured antibody responses in cohorts of hospitalized patients and healthcare workers followed for up to 11 months after symptoms. A mathematical model of antibody kinetics was used to quantify the duration of antibody responses. Antibody response data were used to train algorithms for estimating time since infection. RESULTS: One year after symptoms, we estimate that 36% (95% range, 11%-94%) of anti-Spike immunoglobulin G (IgG) remains, 31% (95% range, 9%-89%) anti-RBD IgG remains, and 7% (1%-31%) of anti-nucleocapsid IgG remains. The multiplex assay classified previous infections into time intervals of 0-3 months, 3-6 months, and 6-12 months. This method was validated using data from a seroprevalence survey in France, demonstrating that historical SARS-CoV-2 transmission can be reconstructed using samples from a single survey. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to diagnosing previous SARS-CoV-2 infection, multiplex serological assays can estimate the time since infection, which can be used to reconstruct past epidemics.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Serologic Tests/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibody Formation , Antibody Specificity , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Kinetics , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sensitivity and Specificity , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Young Adult
6.
J Infect Dis ; 224(6): 983-988, 2021 09 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455308

ABSTRACT

We measured anti-spike (S), nucleoprotein (N), and neutralizing antibodies in sera from 308 healthcare workers with a positive reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction result for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and with mild disease, collected at 2 timepoints up to 6 months after symptom onset. At month 1, anti-S and -N antibody levels were higher in male participants aged >50 years and participants with a body mass index (BMI) >25 kg/m2. At months 3-6, anti-S and anti-N antibodies were detected in 99% and 59% of individuals, respectively. Anti-S antibodies and neutralizing antibodies declined faster in men than in women, independent of age and BMI, suggesting an association of sex with evolution of the humoral response.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Sex Characteristics , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Female , HEK293 Cells , Health Personnel , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
8.
EBioMedicine ; 71: 103561, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372964

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Assessment of the kinetics of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies is essential in predicting risk of reinfection and durability of vaccine protection. METHODS: This is a prospective, monocentric, longitudinal, cohort clinical study. Healthcare workers (HCW) from Strasbourg University Hospital were enrolled between April 6th and May 7th, 2020 and followed up to 422 days. Serial serum samples were tested for antibodies against the Receptor Binding Domain (RBD) of the spike protein and nucleocapsid protein (N) to characterize the kinetics of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and the incidence of reinfection. Live-neutralization assays were performed for a subset of samples before and after vaccination to analyze sensitivity to SARS-CoV-2 variants. FINDINGS: A total of 4290 samples from 393 convalescent COVID-19 and 916 COVID-19 negative individuals were analyzed. In convalescent individuals, SARS-CoV-2 antibodies followed a triphasic kinetic model with half-lives at month (M) 11-13 of 283 days (95% CI 231-349) for anti-N and 725 days (95% CI 623-921) for anti-RBD IgG, which stabilized at a median of 1.54 log BAU/mL (95% CI 1.42-1.67). The incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infections was 12.22 and 0.40 per 100 person-years in COVID-19-negative and COVID-19-positive HCW, respectively, indicating a relative reduction in the incidence of SARS-CoV-2 reinfection of 96.7%. Live-virus neutralization assay revealed that after one year, variants D614G and B.1.1.7, but less so B.1.351, were sensitive to anti-RBD antibodies at 1.4 log BAU/mL, while IgG ≥ 2.0 log BAU/mL strongly neutralized all three variants. These latter anti-RBD IgG titers were reached by all vaccinated HCW regardless of pre-vaccination IgG levels and type of vaccine. INTERPRETATION: Our study demonstrates a long-term persistence of anti-RBD antibodies that may reduce risk of reinfection. By significantly increasing cross-neutralizing antibody titers, a single-dose vaccination strengthens protection against variants. FUN1DING: None.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Immunity, Humoral , Reinfection/pathology , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/metabolism , Kinetics , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Time Factors
9.
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm ; 8(5)2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331974

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare the humoral response after severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) receiving different disease-modifying treatments (DMTs). METHODS: Patients with MS with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and available anti-SARS-CoV-2 serology were included. The primary endpoint was the anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin G (IgG) index. The multivariate analysis was adjusted for COVID-19 severity, SARS-CoV-2 PCR result, and the time between COVID-19 onset and the serology. RESULTS: We included 61 patients with available IgG index. The IgG index was lower in patients with fingolimod or anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies compared with patients without treatment (p < 0.01), patients with interferon ß-1a or glatiramer (p < 0.01), and patients with another DMT (p = 0.01). The IgG index was correlated with the time between COVID-19 onset and serology (r = -0.296 [-0.510; -0.0477], p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Humoral response after COVID-19 was lower in patients with MS with fingolimod or anti-CD20 mAb. These patients could therefore be at risk of recurrent infection and could benefit from anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. The humoral response after vaccination and the delay before vaccination need to be evaluated. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class IV evidence that patients treated with fingolimod or anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies for MS have a lower humoral response after COVID-19 compared with patients without DMTs or with another DMTs.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Multiple Sclerosis/drug therapy , Multiple Sclerosis/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/drug effects , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
10.
J Infect Dis ; 224(9): 1489-1499, 2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317919

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) induces a complex antibody response that varies by orders of magnitude between individuals and over time. METHODS: We developed a multiplex serological test for measuring antibodies to 5 SARS-CoV-2 antigens and the spike proteins of seasonal coronaviruses. We measured antibody responses in cohorts of hospitalized patients and healthcare workers followed for up to 11 months after symptoms. A mathematical model of antibody kinetics was used to quantify the duration of antibody responses. Antibody response data were used to train algorithms for estimating time since infection. RESULTS: One year after symptoms, we estimate that 36% (95% range, 11%-94%) of anti-Spike immunoglobulin G (IgG) remains, 31% (95% range, 9%-89%) anti-RBD IgG remains, and 7% (1%-31%) of anti-nucleocapsid IgG remains. The multiplex assay classified previous infections into time intervals of 0-3 months, 3-6 months, and 6-12 months. This method was validated using data from a seroprevalence survey in France, demonstrating that historical SARS-CoV-2 transmission can be reconstructed using samples from a single survey. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to diagnosing previous SARS-CoV-2 infection, multiplex serological assays can estimate the time since infection, which can be used to reconstruct past epidemics.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Serologic Tests/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibody Formation , Antibody Specificity , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Kinetics , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sensitivity and Specificity , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Young Adult
11.
J Neurol ; 269(2): 577-582, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303319

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The recent lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic has been linked to a higher incidence of psychiatric manifestations and substance abuse. The recreative use of nitrous oxide is more and more widespread and neurological complications are frequent. METHODS: We report clinical characteristics and biological findings of five consecutive patients presenting to our tertiary care center between April 2020 and February 2021 with various neurological symptoms occurring after recent nitrous oxide abuse. RESULTS: Our patients presented with subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord (4/5 patients) or with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (1/5 patients). No patient had reduced vitamin B-12 titer, but all had elevated blood levels of homocysteine and methylmalonic acid. This reflects the functional deficit in vitamin B-12 that can be linked to nitrous oxide consumption. After vitamin B-12 supplementation, clinical signs regressed at least partially in all 5 patients. CONCLUSION: We report an elevated incidence of neurological complications of nitrous oxide abuse occurring during the recent COVID-19 lockdown. Nitrous oxide abuse should be tracked down in patients presenting with compatible neurological symptoms and elevated homocysteinemia. Vitamin B-12 should be supplemented as soon as the diagnosis is made.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vitamin B 12 Deficiency , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Nitrous Oxide/adverse effects , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin B 12 , Vitamin B 12 Deficiency/chemically induced , Vitamin B 12 Deficiency/epidemiology
12.
Ann Clin Transl Neurol ; 8(8): 1738-1744, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300348

ABSTRACT

We evaluated the effect of DMTs on Covid-19 severity in patients with MS, with a pooled-analysis of two large cohorts from Italy and France. The association of baseline characteristics and DMTs with Covid-19 severity was assessed by multivariate ordinal-logistic models and pooled by a fixed-effect meta-analysis. 1066 patients with MS from Italy and 721 from France were included. In the multivariate model, anti-CD20 therapies were significantly associated (OR = 2.05, 95%CI = 1.39-3.02, p < 0.001) with Covid-19 severity, whereas interferon indicated a decreased risk (OR = 0.42, 95%CI = 0.18-0.99, p = 0.047). This pooled-analysis confirms an increased risk of severe Covid-19 in patients on anti-CD20 therapies and supports the protective role of interferon.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Interferons/pharmacology , Multiple Sclerosis/drug therapy , Rituximab/pharmacology , Adult , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Immunologic Factors/adverse effects , Interferons/adverse effects , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Middle Aged , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multivariate Analysis , Protective Factors , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Rituximab/adverse effects , Severity of Illness Index
13.
Nat Med ; 27(5): 917-924, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1152868

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) B.1.1.7 and B.1.351 variants were first identified in the United Kingdom and South Africa, respectively, and have since spread to many countries. These variants harboring diverse mutations in the gene encoding the spike protein raise important concerns about their immune evasion potential. Here, we isolated infectious B.1.1.7 and B.1.351 strains from acutely infected individuals. We examined sensitivity of the two variants to SARS-CoV-2 antibodies present in sera and nasal swabs from individuals infected with previously circulating strains or who were recently vaccinated, in comparison with a D614G reference virus. We utilized a new rapid neutralization assay, based on reporter cells that become positive for GFP after overnight infection. Sera from 58 convalescent individuals collected up to 9 months after symptoms, similarly neutralized B.1.1.7 and D614G. In contrast, after 9 months, convalescent sera had a mean sixfold reduction in neutralizing titers, and 40% of the samples lacked any activity against B.1.351. Sera from 19 individuals vaccinated twice with Pfizer Cominarty, longitudinally tested up to 6 weeks after vaccination, were similarly potent against B.1.1.7 but less efficacious against B.1.351, when compared to D614G. Neutralizing titers increased after the second vaccine dose, but remained 14-fold lower against B.1.351. In contrast, sera from convalescent or vaccinated individuals similarly bound the three spike proteins in a flow cytometry-based serological assay. Neutralizing antibodies were rarely detected in nasal swabs from vaccinees. Thus, faster-spreading SARS-CoV-2 variants acquired a partial resistance to neutralizing antibodies generated by natural infection or vaccination, which was most frequently detected in individuals with low antibody levels. Our results indicate that B1.351, but not B.1.1.7, may increase the risk of infection in immunized individuals.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Convalescence , Cross Reactions , Humans , Neutralization Tests , Sensitivity and Specificity , Vaccination
14.
Lancet Microbe ; 2(2): e60-e69, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065710

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) induces an antibody response targeting multiple antigens that changes over time. This study aims to take advantage of this complexity to develop more accurate serological diagnostics. METHODS: A multiplex serological assay was developed to measure IgG and IgM antibody responses to seven SARS-CoV-2 spike or nucleoprotein antigens, two antigens for the nucleoproteins of the 229E and NL63 seasonal coronaviruses, and three non-coronavirus antigens. Antibodies were measured in serum samples collected up to 39 days after symptom onset from 215 adults in four French hospitals (53 patients and 162 health-care workers) with quantitative RT-PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, and negative control serum samples collected from healthy adult blood donors before the start of the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic (335 samples from France, Thailand, and Peru). Machine learning classifiers were trained with the multiplex data to classify individuals with previous SARS-CoV-2 infection, with the best classification performance displayed by a random forests algorithm. A Bayesian mathematical model of antibody kinetics informed by prior information from other coronaviruses was used to estimate time-varying antibody responses and assess the sensitivity and classification performance of serological diagnostics during the first year following symptom onset. A statistical estimator is presented that can provide estimates of seroprevalence in very low-transmission settings. FINDINGS: IgG antibody responses to trimeric spike protein (Stri) identified individuals with previous SARS-CoV-2 infection with 91·6% (95% CI 87·5-94·5) sensitivity and 99·1% (97·4-99·7) specificity. Using a serological signature of IgG and IgM to multiple antigens, it was possible to identify infected individuals with 98·8% (96·5-99·6) sensitivity and 99·3% (97·6-99·8) specificity. Informed by existing data from other coronaviruses, we estimate that 1 year after infection, a monoplex assay with optimal anti-Stri IgG cutoff has 88·7% (95% credible interval 63·4-97·4) sensitivity and that a four-antigen multiplex assay can increase sensitivity to 96·4% (80·9-100·0). When applied to population-level serological surveys, statistical analysis of multiplex data allows estimation of seroprevalence levels less than 2%, below the false-positivity rate of many other assays. INTERPRETATION: Serological signatures based on antibody responses to multiple antigens can provide accurate and robust serological classification of individuals with previous SARS-CoV-2 infection. This provides potential solutions to two pressing challenges for SARS-CoV-2 serological surveillance: classifying individuals who were infected more than 6 months ago and measuring seroprevalence in serological surveys in very low-transmission settings. FUNDING: European Research Council. Fondation pour la Recherche Médicale. Institut Pasteur Task Force COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Antibodies, Viral , Bayes Theorem , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Immunoglobulin M , Machine Learning , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Seroepidemiologic Studies
15.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3461-3466, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-889737

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) or myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody-associated disease (MOGAD), often treated with immunosuppressive therapies, are still unknown. METHODS: We conducted a multicenter, retrospective, observational cohort study among all French expert centers for neuromyelitis optica and related disorders. Patients with NMOSD or MOGAD included in the study received a confirmed or highly suspected diagnosis of COVID-19 between 1 March 2020 and 30 June 2020. Main outcome was COVID-19 severity score assessed on a seven-point ordinal scale ranging from 1 (not hospitalized with no limitations on activities) to 7 (death). RESULTS: Fifteen cases (mean [SD] age: 39.3 [14.3] years, 11 female) were included. Five patients (33.3%) were hospitalized, all receiving rituximab. A 24-year-old patient with positive aquaporine-4 antibody, with obesity as comorbidity, needed mechanical ventilation. Outpatients were receiving anti-CD20 (5), mycophenolate mofetil (3) or azathioprine (3). They were younger (mean [SD] age: 37.0 [13.4] years), with a longer disease duration (mean [SD]: 8.3 [6.3] years) and had a lower expanded disability severity score (EDSS) score (median [range] EDSS: 2.5 [0-4]) relative to patients requiring hospitalization (mean [SD] age: 44.0 [16.4] years, mean [SD] disease duration: 5.8 [5.5] years, median [range] EDSS: 4 [0-6.5]). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 outcome was overall favorable in this cohort. Larger international studies are needed to identify risk factors of severe COVID-19; however, we recommend personal protective measures to reduce risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection in this immunocompromised population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neuromyelitis Optica , Adult , Aquaporin 4 , Female , Humans , Neuromyelitis Optica/drug therapy , Neuromyelitis Optica/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Rituximab , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
16.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 98(4): 115181, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-725737

ABSTRACT

Rapid and accurate diagnosis is crucial for successful outbreak containment. During the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) public health emergency, the gold standard for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection diagnosis is the detection of viral RNA. Additional diagnostic methods õenabling the detection of current or past SARS-CoV-2 infection would be highly beneficial. We assessed 2 immunochromatographic lateral flow assays (LFA-1, LFA-2) and 2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits (IgA/IgG ELISA-1, IgM/IgG ELISA-2) using 325 samples: serum samples from polymerase chain reaction-confirmed COVID-19 hospitalized patients (n = 55) and healthcare workers (n = 143) and 127 samples from negative controls. Diagnostic performances were assessed according to days after symptom onset (dso) and the antigenic format used by manufacturers. Clinical sensitivities varied greatly among the assays, showing poor mutual agreement. After 15 dso, ELISA-1 (Euroimmun) and LFA-1 (Biosynex) combining IgM and IgG detection showed the best performances. A thorough selection of serological assays for the detection of ongoing or past infections is advisable.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Immunoassay/methods , Mass Screening/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Polymerase Chain Reaction , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Young Adult
17.
EBioMedicine ; 59: 102915, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691414

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The serologic response of individuals with mild forms of SARS-CoV-2 infection is poorly characterized. METHODS: Hospital staff who had recovered from mild forms of PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were tested for anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies using two assays: a rapid immunodiagnostic test (99.4% specificity) and the S-Flow assay (~99% specificity). The neutralizing activity of the sera was tested with a pseudovirus-based assay. FINDINGS: Of 162 hospital staff who participated in the investigation, 160 reported SARS-CoV-2 infection that had not required hospital admission and were included in these analyses. The median time from symptom onset to blood sample collection was 24 days (IQR: 21-28, range 13-39). The rapid immunodiagnostic test detected antibodies in 153 (95.6%) of the samples and the S-Flow assay in 159 (99.4%), failing to detect antibodies in one sample collected 18 days after symptom onset (the rapid test did not detect antibodies in that patient). Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) were detected in 79%, 92% and 98% of samples collected 13-20, 21-27 and 28-41 days after symptom onset, respectively (P = 0.02). INTERPRETATION: Antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 were detected in virtually all hospital staff sampled from 13 days after the onset of COVID-19 symptoms. This finding supports the use of serologic testing for the diagnosis of individuals who have recovered from SARS-CoV-2 infection. The neutralizing activity of the antibodies increased overtime. Future studies will help assess the persistence of the humoral response and its associated neutralization capacity in recovered patients. FUNDINGS: The funders had no role in study design, data collection, interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , France , Health Personnel , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Serologic Tests , Severity of Illness Index
18.
Mult Scler ; 26(10): 1157-1162, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646806

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We need high-quality data to assess the determinants for COVID-19 severity in people with MS (PwMS). Several studies have recently emerged but there is great benefit in aligning data collection efforts at a global scale. OBJECTIVES: Our mission is to scale-up COVID-19 data collection efforts and provide the MS community with data-driven insights as soon as possible. METHODS: Numerous stakeholders were brought together. Small dedicated interdisciplinary task forces were created to speed-up the formulation of the study design and work plan. First step was to agree upon a COVID-19 MS core data set. Second, we worked on providing a user-friendly and rapid pipeline to share COVID-19 data at a global scale. RESULTS: The COVID-19 MS core data set was agreed within 48 hours. To date, 23 data collection partners are involved and the first data imports have been performed successfully. Data processing and analysis is an on-going process. CONCLUSIONS: We reached a consensus on a core data set and established data sharing processes with multiple partners to address an urgent need for information to guide clinical practice. First results show that partners are motivated to share data to attain the ultimate joint goal: better understand the effect of COVID-19 in PwMS.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Registries , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Data Collection , Humans , Information Dissemination , International Cooperation , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
19.
JAMA Neurol ; 77(9): 1079-1088, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-616243

ABSTRACT

Importance: Risk factors associated with the severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) are unknown. Disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) may modify the risk of developing a severe COVID-19 infection, beside identified risk factors such as age and comorbidities. Objective: To describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients with MS and COVID-19 and identify factors associated with COVID-19 severity. Design, Setting, and Participants: The Covisep registry is a multicenter, retrospective, observational cohort study conducted in MS expert centers and general hospitals and with neurologists collaborating with MS expert centers and members of the Société Francophone de la Sclérose en Plaques. The study included patients with MS presenting with a confirmed or highly suspected diagnosis of COVID-19 between March 1, 2020, and May 21, 2020. Exposures: COVID-19 diagnosed with a polymerase chain reaction test on a nasopharyngeal swab, thoracic computed tomography, or typical symptoms. Main Outcomes and Measures: The main outcome was COVID-19 severity assessed on a 7-point ordinal scale (ranging from 1 [not hospitalized with no limitations on activities] to 7 [death]) with a cutoff at 3 (hospitalized and not requiring supplemental oxygen). We collected demographics, neurological history, Expanded Disability Severity Scale score (EDSS; ranging from 0 to 10, with cutoffs at 3 and 6), comorbidities, COVID-19 characteristics, and outcomes. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the association of collected variables with COVID-19 outcomes. Results: A total of 347 patients (mean [SD] age, 44.6 [12.8] years, 249 women; mean [SD] disease duration, 13.5 [10.0] years) were analyzed. Seventy-three patients (21.0%) had a COVID-19 severity score of 3 or more, and 12 patients (3.5%) died of COVID-19. The median EDSS was 2.0 (range, 0-9.5), and 284 patients (81.8%) were receiving DMT. There was a higher proportion of patients with a COVID-19 severity score of 3 or more among patients with no DMT relative to patients receiving DMTs (46.0% vs 15.5%; P < .001). Multivariate logistic regression models determined that age (odds ratio per 10 years: 1.9 [95% CI, 1.4-2.5]), EDSS (OR for EDSS ≥6, 6.3 [95% CI. 2.8-14.4]), and obesity (OR, 3.0 [95% CI, 1.0-8.7]) were independent risk factors for a COVID-19 severity score of 3 or more (indicating hospitalization or higher severity). The EDSS was associated with the highest variability of COVID-19 severe outcome (R2, 0.2), followed by age (R2, 0.06) and obesity (R2, 0.01). Conclusions and Relevance: In this registry-based cohort study of patients with MS, age, EDSS, and obesity were independent risk factors for severe COVID-19; there was no association found between DMTs exposure and COVID-19 severity. The identification of these risk factors should provide the rationale for an individual strategy regarding clinical management of patients with MS during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Registries , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
20.
Radiology ; 297(2): E242-E251, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-599380

ABSTRACT

Background Brain MRI parenchymal signal abnormalities have been associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Purpose To describe the neuroimaging findings (excluding ischemic infarcts) in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective study of patients evaluated from March 23, 2020, to April 27, 2020, at 16 hospitals. Inclusion criteria were (a) positive nasopharyngeal or lower respiratory tract reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays, (b) severe COVID-19 infection defined as a requirement for hospitalization and oxygen therapy, (c) neurologic manifestations, and (d) abnormal brain MRI findings. Exclusion criteria were patients with missing or noncontributory data regarding brain MRI or brain MRI showing ischemic infarcts, cerebral venous thrombosis, or chronic lesions unrelated to the current event. Categorical data were compared using the Fisher exact test. Quantitative data were compared using the Student t test or Wilcoxon test. P < .05 represented a significant difference. Results Thirty men (81%) and seven women (19%) met the inclusion criteria, with a mean age of 61 years ± 12 (standard deviation) (age range, 8-78 years). The most common neurologic manifestations were alteration of consciousness (27 of 37, 73%), abnormal wakefulness when sedation was stopped (15 of 37, 41%), confusion (12 of 37, 32%), and agitation (seven of 37, 19%). The most frequent MRI findings were signal abnormalities located in the medial temporal lobe in 16 of 37 patients (43%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 27%, 59%), nonconfluent multifocal white matter hyperintense lesions seen with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted sequences with variable enhancement, with associated hemorrhagic lesions in 11 of 37 patients (30%; 95% CI: 15%, 45%), and extensive and isolated white matter microhemorrhages in nine of 37 patients (24%; 95% CI: 10%, 38%). A majority of patients (20 of 37, 54%) had intracerebral hemorrhagic lesions with a more severe clinical presentation and a higher admission rate in intensive care units (20 of 20 patients [100%] vs 12 of 17 patients without hemorrhage [71%], P = .01) and development of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (20 of 20 patients [100%] vs 11 of 17 patients [65%], P = .005). Only one patient had SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the cerebrospinal fluid. Conclusion Patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 and without ischemic infarcts had a wide range of neurologic manifestations that were associated with abnormal brain MRI scans. Eight distinctive neuroradiologic patterns were described. © RSNA, 2020.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Brain/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Child , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
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