Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 15 de 15
Filter
1.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2022 Jul 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1922215

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The immune response to COVID-19 vaccination is inferior in kidney transplant recipients (KTR), and to a lesser extent in patients on dialysis or with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We assessed the immune response 6 months after mRNA-1273 vaccination in kidney patients and compared this to controls. METHODS: 152 participants with CKD stages G4/5 (eGFR <30  mL/min/1.73m2), 145 participants on dialysis, 267 KTR, and 181 controls were included. SARS-CoV-2 Spike S1-specific IgG antibodies were measured by fluorescent bead-based multiplex-immunoassay, neutralizing antibodies to ancestral, Delta and Omicron (BA.1) variants by plaque reduction, and T-cell responses by IFN-γ release assay. RESULTS: At 6 months after vaccination S1-specific antibodies were detected in 100% of controls, 98.7% of CKD G4/5 patients, 95.1% of dialysis patients, and 56.6% of KTR. These figures were comparable to the response rates at 28 days, but antibody levels waned significantly. Neutralization of the ancestral and Delta variant was detected in most participants, whereas neutralization of Omicron was mostly absent. S-specific T-cell responses were detected 6 months in 75.0% of controls, 69.4% of CKD G4/5 patients, 52.6% of dialysis patients, and 12.9% of KTR. T-cell responses at 6 months were significantly lower than responses at 28 days. CONCLUSIONS: Although seropositivity rates at 6 months were comparable to that at 28 days after vaccination, significantly decreased antibody levels and T-cell responses were observed. The combination of low antibody levels, reduced T-cell responses, and absent neutralization of the newly-emerging variants indicates the need for additional boosts or alternative vaccination strategies in KTR.

3.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2022 Jun 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1901150

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants raised questions regarding the durability of immune responses after homologous or heterologous booster vaccination after Ad26.COV2.S priming. We found that SARS-CoV-2-specific binding antibodies, neutralizing antibodies and T-cells are detectable 5 months after boosting, although waning of antibodies and limited cross-reactivity with Omicron BA.1 was observed.

4.
Chronobiol Int ; 39(8): 1100-1109, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819675

ABSTRACT

Night-shift workers experience disturbances of their circadian rhythm and sleep, which may make them more susceptible to infectious diseases. Therefore, we studied whether night-shift workers are at higher risk of testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection than day workers. In this prospective study, data were used from 20 questionnaire rounds of the Dutch Lifelines COVID-19 cohort that was initiated in March 2020. In the different questionnaire rounds, 2285 night-shift workers and 23,766 day workers reported whether they had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for demographic, work, and health covariates were used to compare SARS-CoV-2 incidence between night-shift and day workers. From March 2020-January 2021, 3.4% of night-shift workers and 2.2% of day workers reported to have tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 (p < .001). After adjustment for covariates, night-shift workers had a 37% higher risk of testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 (hazard ratio: 1.37, 95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.77). In this study, we show that night-shift workers were more likely to test positive for SARS-CoV-2 than day workers, which adds to the growing evidence that night-shift work may influence the complex processes involved in infection susceptibility. Further mechanistic insight is needed to understand the relation between night-shift work and (SARS-CoV-2) infection susceptibility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Shift Work Schedule , Circadian Rhythm , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Work Schedule Tolerance
5.
RMD Open ; 8(1)2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788979

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate humoral and cellular immune responses and adverse events (AEs) after COVID-19 vaccination in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) compared to healthy controls (HC), and disease activity following vaccination in patients with pSS. METHODS: 67 patients with pSS and 33 HC (ratio 2:1) received COVID-19 vaccinations following the Dutch vaccination programme. Patients with pSS did not use immunomodulatory drugs, except hydroxychloroquine. Anti-spike 1 receptor binding domain IgG serum antibody levels were measured 28 days after complete vaccination. AEs were collected 7 days after vaccination. In a subgroup, salivary anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and T-cell response by interferon-γ enzyme-linked immune absorbent spot was measured. RESULTS: 47 patients with pSS (70%) and 14 HC (42%) received BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNtech), 13 (19%) and 5 (15%) received ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 (AstraZeneca), 6 (9%) and 8 (24%) received mRNA-1273 (Moderna), and 1 (1%) and 6 (18%) received Ad.26.COV2.S (Janssen). All participants had positive anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels (>2500 AU/mL) postvaccination. No differences in anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels were observed between patients with pSS and HC, for each vaccine type. Salivary anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies also increased, and a T-cell response was observed in patients with pSS and HC. Frequencies of systemic AEs were comparable between patients with pSS and HC (first vaccination: 34/67 (51%) vs 16/33 (48%), p=0.83; second: 41/66 (62%) vs 14/25 (56%), p=0.59). No significant worsening was observed in patient-reported and systemic disease activity, including auto-antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with pSS had similar humoral and cellular immune responses as HC, suggesting COVID-19 vaccination is effective in patients with pSS. AEs were also comparable, and no increase in disease activity was seen in patients with pSS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sjogren's Syndrome , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , SARS-CoV-2 , Sjogren's Syndrome/complications , Vaccination/adverse effects
6.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-331736

ABSTRACT

Background: The i mmune response to COVID-19 vaccination is inferior in kidney transplant recipients (KTR), and to a lesser extent in patients on dialysis or with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We assessed the immune response 6 months after mRNA-1273 vaccination in kidney patients and compared this to controls. Methods: 152 participants with CKD stages G4/5 (eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73m 2 ), 145 participants on dialysis, 267 KTR, and 181 controls were included. SARS-CoV-2 Spike S1-specific IgG antibodies were measured by fluorescent bead-based multiplex-immunoassay, neutralizing antibodies to ancestral, Delta and Omicron (BA.1) variants by plaque reduction, and T-cell responses by IFN-γ release assay. Findings: At 6 months after vaccination S1-specific antibodies were detected in 100% of controls, 98.7% of CKD G4/5 patients, 95.1% of dialysis patients, and 56.6% of KTR. These figures were comparable to the response rates at 28 days, but antibody levels waned significantly. Neutralization of the ancestral and Delta variant was detected in most participants, whereas neutralization of Omicron was mostly absent. S-specific T-cell responses were detected 6 months in 75.0% of controls, 69.4% of CKD G4/5 patients, 52.6% of dialysis patients, and 12.9% of KTR. T-cell responses at 6 months were significantly lower than responses at 28 days. Interpretation: Although seropositivity rates at 6 months were comparable to that at 28 days after vaccination, significantly decreased antibody levels and T-cell responses were observed. The combination of low antibody levels, reduced T-cell responses, and absent neutralization of the newly-emerging variants indicates the need for additional boosts or alternative vaccination strategies in KTR.

7.
J Heart Lung Transplant ; 41(6): 765-772, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739750

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Serological responses to COVID-19 vaccination are diminished in recipients of solid organ transplants, especially in lung transplant recipients (LTR), probably as result of immunosuppressive treatment. There is currently no marker of immunosuppression that can be used to predict the COVID-19 vaccination response. Here, we study whether torque tenovirus (TTV), a highly prevalent virus can be used as an indicator of immunosuppression. METHODS: The humoral response to the mRNA 1273 vaccine was assessed in 103 LTR, who received a transplant between 4 and 237 months prior to vaccination, by measuring Spike (S)-specific IgG levels at baseline, 28 days after first, and 28 days after the second vaccination. TTV loads were determined by RT-PCR and Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to correlate serological responses to TTV load. RESULTS: Humoral responses to COVID-19 vaccination were observed in 41 of 103 (40%) LTR at 28 days after the second vaccination. Sixty-two of 103 (60%) were non-responders. Lower TTV loads at baseline (significantly) correlated with higher S-specific antibodies and a higher percentage of responders. Lower TTV loads also strongly correlated with longer time since transplantation, indicating that participants with lower TTV loads were longer after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a better humoral response to the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in subjects with a lower TTV load pre-vaccination. In addition, TTV load correlates with the time after transplantation. Further studies on the use of TTV load in vaccination efficacy studies in immunocompromised cohorts should provide leads for the potential use of this marker for optimizing vaccination response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Torque teno virus , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273 , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Lung , SARS-CoV-2 , Torque , Torque teno virus/genetics , Transplant Recipients , Vaccination
9.
N Engl J Med ; 386(10): 951-963, 2022 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1642068

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Ad26.COV2.S vaccine, which was approved as a single-shot immunization regimen, has been shown to be effective against severe coronavirus disease 2019. However, this vaccine induces lower severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike protein (S)-specific antibody levels than those induced by messenger RNA (mRNA)-based vaccines. The immunogenicity and reactogenicity of a homologous or heterologous booster in persons who have received an Ad26.COV2.S priming dose are unclear. METHODS: In this single-blind, multicenter, randomized, controlled trial involving health care workers who had received a priming dose of Ad26.COV2.S vaccine, we assessed immunogenicity and reactogenicity 28 days after a homologous or heterologous booster vaccination. The participants were assigned to receive no booster, an Ad26.COV2.S booster, an mRNA-1273 booster, or a BNT162b2 booster. The primary end point was the level of S-specific binding antibodies, and the secondary end points were the levels of neutralizing antibodies, S-specific T-cell responses, and reactogenicity. A post hoc analysis was performed to compare mRNA-1273 boosting with BNT162b2 boosting. RESULTS: Homologous or heterologous booster vaccination resulted in higher levels of S-specific binding antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and T-cell responses than a single Ad26.COV2.S vaccination. The increase in binding antibodies was significantly larger with heterologous regimens that included mRNA-based vaccines than with the homologous booster. The mRNA-1273 booster was most immunogenic and was associated with higher reactogenicity than the BNT162b2 and Ad26.COV2.S boosters. Local and systemic reactions were generally mild to moderate in the first 2 days after booster administration. CONCLUSIONS: The Ad26.COV2.S and mRNA boosters had an acceptable safety profile and were immunogenic in health care workers who had received a priming dose of Ad26.COV2.S vaccine. The strongest responses occurred after boosting with mRNA-based vaccines. Boosting with any available vaccine was better than not boosting. (Funded by the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development ZonMw; SWITCH ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04927936.).


Subject(s)
/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Immunization, Secondary , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Immunoglobulin G/blood , /immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Female , Humans , Interferon-gamma/blood , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Single-Blind Method , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
10.
Lancet Oncol ; 22(12): 1681-1691, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586209

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with cancer have an increased risk of complications from SARS-CoV-2 infection. Vaccination to prevent COVID-19 is recommended, but data on the immunogenicity and safety of COVID-19 vaccines for patients with solid tumours receiving systemic cancer treatment are scarce. Therefore, we aimed to assess the impact of immunotherapy, chemotherapy, and chemoimmunotherapy on the immunogenicity and safety of the mRNA-1273 (Moderna Biotech, Madrid, Spain) COVID-19 vaccine as part of the Vaccination Against COVID in Cancer (VOICE) trial. METHODS: This prospective, multicentre, non-inferiority trial was done across three centres in the Netherlands. Individuals aged 18 years or older with a life expectancy of more than 12 months were enrolled into four cohorts: individuals without cancer (cohort A [control cohort]), and patients with solid tumours, regardless of stage and histology, treated with immunotherapy (cohort B), chemotherapy (cohort C), or chemoimmunotherapy (cohort D). Participants received two mRNA-1273 vaccinations of 100 µg in 0·5 mL intramuscularly, 28 days apart. The primary endpoint, analysed per protocol (excluding patients with a positive baseline sample [>10 binding antibody units (BAU)/mL], indicating previous SARS-CoV-2 infection), was defined as the SARS-CoV-2 spike S1-specific IgG serum antibody response (ie, SARS-CoV-2-binding antibody concentration of >10 BAU/mL) 28 days after the second vaccination. For the primary endpoint analysis, a non-inferiority design with a margin of 10% was used. We also assessed adverse events in all patients who received at least one vaccination, and recorded solicited adverse events in participants who received at least one vaccination but excluding those who already had seroconversion (>10 BAU/mL) at baseline. This study is ongoing and is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04715438. FINDINGS: Between Feb 17 and March 12, 2021, 791 participants were enrolled and followed up for a median of 122 days (IQR 118 to 128). A SARS-CoV-2-binding antibody response was found in 240 (100%; 95% CI 98 to 100) of 240 evaluable participants in cohort A, 130 (99%; 96 to >99) of 131 evaluable patients in cohort B, 223 (97%; 94 to 99) of 229 evaluable patients in cohort C, and 143 (100%; 97 to 100) of 143 evaluable patients in cohort D. The SARS-CoV-2-binding antibody response in each patient cohort was non-inferior compared with cohort A. No new safety signals were observed. Grade 3 or worse serious adverse events occurred in no participants in cohort A, three (2%) of 137 patients in cohort B, six (2%) of 244 patients in cohort C, and one (1%) of 163 patients in cohort D, with four events (two of fever, and one each of diarrhoea and febrile neutropenia) potentially related to the vaccination. There were no vaccine-related deaths. INTERPRETATION: Most patients with cancer develop, while receiving chemotherapy, immunotherapy, or both for a solid tumour, an adequate antibody response to vaccination with the mRNA-1273 COVID-19 vaccine. The vaccine is also safe in these patients. The minority of patients with an inadequate response after two vaccinations might benefit from a third vaccination. FUNDING: ZonMw, The Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development.


Subject(s)
/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents/immunology , Immunotherapy , Neoplasms/therapy , Vaccination/adverse effects , /administration & dosage , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Combined Modality Therapy , Female , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Immunomodulation , Injections, Intramuscular , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/immunology , Netherlands , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Transplantation ; 106(4): 821-834, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511132

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In kidney patients COVID-19 is associated with severely increased morbidity and mortality. A comprehensive comparison of the immunogenicity, tolerability, and safety of COVID-19 vaccination in different cohorts of kidney patients and a control cohort is lacking. METHODS: This investigator driven, prospective, controlled multicenter study included 162 participants with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages G4/5 (eGFR < 30 mL/min/1.73m2), 159 participants on dialysis, 288 kidney transplant recipients, and 191 controls. Participants received 2 doses of the mRNA-1273 COVID-19 vaccine (Moderna). The primary endpoint was seroconversion. RESULTS: Transplant recipients had a significantly lower seroconversion rate when compared with controls (56.9% versus 100%, P < 0.001), with especially mycophenolic acid, but also, higher age, lower lymphocyte concentration, lower eGFR, and shorter time after transplantation being associated with nonresponder state. Transplant recipients also showed significantly lower titers of neutralizing antibodies and T-cell responses when compared with controls. Although a high seroconversion rate was observed for participants with CKD G4/5 (100%) and on dialysis (99.4%), mean antibody concentrations in the CKD G4/5 cohort and dialysis cohort were lower than in controls (2405 [interquartile interval 1287-4524] and 1650 [698-3024] versus 3186 [1896-4911] BAU/mL, P = 0.06 and P < 0.001, respectively). Dialysis patients and especially kidney transplant recipients experienced less systemic vaccination related adverse events. No specific safety issues were noted. CONCLUSIONS: The immune response following vaccination in patients with CKD G4/5 and on dialysis is almost comparable to controls. In contrast, kidney transplant recipients have a poor response. In this latter, patient group development of alternative vaccination strategies are warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Transplantation , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Humans , Immunity , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Prospective Studies , Renal Dialysis , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/therapy , Vaccination
14.
Aging Cell ; 20(6): e13372, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247110

ABSTRACT

Severe respiratory viral infectious diseases such as influenza and COVID-19 especially affect the older population. This is partly ascribed to diminished CD8+ T-cell responses a result of aging. The phenotypical diversity of the CD8+ T-cell population has made it difficult to identify the impact of aging on CD8+ T-cell subsets associated with diminished CD8+ T-cell responses. Here we identify a novel human CD8+ T-cell subset characterized by expression of Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR+ ) and CD45RA (RA+ ). These KIR+ RA+ T cells accumulated with age in the blood of healthy individuals (20-82 years of age, n = 50), expressed high levels of aging-related markers of T-cell regulation, and were functionally capable of suppressing proliferation of other CD8+ T cells. Moreover, KIR+ RA+ T cells were a major T-cell subset becoming activated in older adults suffering from an acute respiratory viral infection (n = 36), including coronavirus and influenza virus infection. In addition, older adults with influenza A infection showed that higher activation status of their KIR+ RA+ T cells associated with longer duration of respiratory symptoms. Together, our data indicate that KIR+ RA+ T cells are a unique human T-cell subset with regulatory properties that may explain susceptibility to viral respiratory disease at old age.


Subject(s)
Aging/physiology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/virology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Influenza, Human/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Receptors, KIR/blood , Receptors, KIR/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL