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1.
Int J Clin Pract ; : e14900, 2021 Sep 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429761

ABSTRACT

AIM: This meta-analysis aimed to explore potential risk factors for severe Covid-19. METHODS: We systemically and comprehensively retrieved the eligible study evaluating clinical differences between severe vs non-severe Covid-19. Main effect sizes were demographic characteristics, comorbidities, signs and symptoms, laboratory findings as well as radiological features of chest CT. RESULTS: A total of 2566 Covid-19 people (771 in the severe group and 1795 in the non-severe group) from 14 studies were eligible for this meta-analysis. It was demonstrated that older age and males were more likely to have severe Covid-19. Patients with underlying comorbidities, such as hypertension, diabetes, heart disease and COPD were significantly more susceptible to severe Covid-19. Patients with dyspnoea were more likely to be severely ill. Depressed total lymphocytes were observed in this article. Meanwhile, although reticulation (30.8%), intrathoracic lymph node enlargement (20.5%) and pleural effusions (30.8%) were relatively infrequent, meta-analysis revealed that patients with these presentations in chest CT were associated with increased risk of severe Covid-19. CONCLUSIONS: There are significant differences in clinical characteristics between the severe and non-severe Covid-19 patients. Many factors are related to the severity of the disease, which can help clinicians to differentiate severe patients from non-severe patients.

2.
Am J Addict ; 2021 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416264

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of problematic Internet use (PIU) in the post-COVID-19 pandemic era is not known. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of PIU among baccalaureate nursing students (hereafter: nursing students) in the post-COVID-19 era. METHODS: A total of 1070 nursing students were consecutively invited to participate in this study from the nursing schools of five universities. PIU and quality of life (QOL) were assessed using the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF), respectively. t Tests, χ2 , tests, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare basic demographic and clinical characteristics between participants with and without PIU. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to examine independent correlates. RESULTS: The prevalence of PIU was 23.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.7%-25.8%). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that second- (p = .024) and third-year (p = .012) students were more likely to suffer from PIU compared with first year students. Students with more severe depressive (p = .014) and anxiety symptoms (p = .011) were independently and significantly associated with more severe PIU. After controlling for covariates, nursing students with PIU had a lower overall QOL score (p = .002). CONCLUSION AND SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE: Problematic Internet use (PIU) was common among nursing students in the post-COVID-19 era. Considering the negative impact of PIU on QOL and academic performance, regular screening should be conducted and effective interventions implemented for nursing students with PIU. This was the first study on the prevalence of PIU among nursing students in the post-COVID-19 era. The findings of this study could help health professionals and education authorities to understand the patterns of PIU and its influence on QOL among nursing students and to allocate health resources and develop effective measures to reduce the risk of PIU in this population.

3.
J Med Virol ; 2021 Aug 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359798

ABSTRACT

The durability of infection-induced severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) immunity has crucial implications for reinfection and vaccine effectiveness. However, the relationship between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity and long-term anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody level is poorly understood. Here, we measured the longevity of SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG antibodies in survivors who had recovered from COVID-19 1 year previously. In a cohort of 473 survivors with varying disease severity (asymptomatic, mild, moderate, or severe), we observed a positive correlation between virus-specific IgG antibody titers and COVID-19 severity. In particular, the highest virus-specific IgG antibody titers were observed in patients with severe COVID-19. By contrast, 74.4% of recovered asymptomatic carriers had negative anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG test results, while many others had very low virus-specific IgG antibody titers. Our results demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG persistence and titer depend on COVID-19 severity.

4.
Ann Palliat Med ; 10(7): 7329-7339, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311480

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to build a radiomics model with deep learning (DL) and human auditing and examine its diagnostic value in differentiating between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). METHODS: Forty-three COVID-19 patients, whose diagnoses had been confirmed with reverse-transcriptase polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) tests, and 60 CAP patients, whose diagnoses had been confirmed with sputum cultures, were enrolled in this retrospective study. The candidate regions of interest (ROIs) on the computed tomography (CT) images of the 103 patients were determined using a DL-based segmentation model powered by transfer learning. These ROIs were manually audited and corrected by 3 radiologists (with an average of 12 years of experience; range 6-17 years) to check the segmentation acceptance for the radiomics analysis. ROI-derived radiomics features were subsequently extracted to build the classification model and processed using 4 different algorithms (L1 regularization, Lasso, Ridge, and Z test) and 4 classifiers, including the logistic regression (LR), multi-layer perceptron (MLP), support vector machine (SVM), and extreme Gradient Boosting (XGboost). A receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was conducted to evaluate the performance of the model. RESULTS: Quantitative CT measurements derived from human-audited segmentation results showed that COVID-19 patients had significantly decreased numbers of infected lobes compared to patients in the CAP group {median [interquartile range (IQR)]: 4 [3, 4] and 4 [4, 5]; P=0.031}. The infected percentage (%) of the whole lung was significantly more elevated in the CAP group [6.40 (2.77, 11.11)] than the COVID-19 group [1.83 (0.65, 4.42); P<0.001], and the same trend applied to each lobe, except for the superior lobe of the right lung [1.81 (0.09, 5.28) for COVID-19 vs. 1.32 (0.14, 7.02) for CAP; P=0.649]. Additionally, the highest proportion of infected lesions were observed in the CT value range of (-470, -370) Hounsfield units (HU) in the COVID-19 group. Conversely, the CAP group had a value range of (30, 60) HU. Radiomic model using corrected ROIs exhibited the highest area under ROC (AUC) of 0.990 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.962-1.000] using Lasso for feature selection and MLP for classification. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed radiomics model based on human-audited segmentation made accurate differential diagnoses of COVID-19 and CAP. The quantification of CT measurements derived from DL could potentially be used as effective biomarkers in current clinical practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Learning , Computers , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Nano Today ; : 101243, 2021 Jul 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300951

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of SARS-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2) has become a global health emergency. Although enormous efforts have been made, there is still no effective treatment against the new virus. Herein, a TiO2 supported single-atom nanozyme containing atomically dispersed Ag atoms (Ag-TiO2 SAN) is designed to serve as a highly efficient antiviral nanomaterial. Compared with troditional nano-TiO2 and Ag, Ag-TiO2 SAN exhibits higher adsorption (99.65%) of SARS-CoV2 pseudovirus. This adsorption ability is due to the interaction between SAN and receptor binding domain (RBD) of spike 1 protein of SARS-CoV2. Theoretical calculation and experimental evidience indicate that the Ag atoms of SAN strongly bind to cysteine and asparagine, which are the most abundant amino acids on the surface of spike 1 RBD. After binding to the virus, the SAN/virus complex is typically phagocytosed by macrophages and colocalized with lysosomes. Interestingly, Ag-TiO2 SAN possesses high peroxidase-like activity responsible for reactive oxygen species production under acid conditions. The highly acidic microenvironment of lysosomes could favor oxygen reduction reaction process to eliminate the virus. With hACE2 transgenic mice, Ag-TiO2 SAN showed efficient anti-SARS-CoV2 pseudovirus activity. In conclusion, Ag-TiO2 SAN is a promising nanomaterial to achieve effective antiviral effects for SARS-CoV2.

6.
Preventive Medicine Reports ; : 101449, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1267887

ABSTRACT

Adherence to guidelines for face coverings and physical distancing are critical strategies to stem the COVID-19 pandemic but are not uniformly followed. Understanding factors associated with adherence to mask-wearing and physical distancing may help guide future control efforts. We conducted an observational study using Systematic Observation of Mask Adherence and Distancing (SOMAD) in August 2020 in parks, playgrounds and commercial streets in each of 10 City Council Districts in Philadelphia, PA. Wearing a mask correctly varied by setting with highest adherence in commercial areas and lowest in playgrounds. Almost 17% wore visible masks that did not cover the nose and/or mouth. There were multiple disparities in correct mask use. Females had higher rates than males (unadjusted relative risk = 1.40, p<.0001) and seniors higher than any other age group (unadjusted chi-square p < .0001). Asians wore masks correctly the most often [adjusted log odds ratio (LOR) = 0.53 compared with non-Hispanic white, p=0.02]. Correct mask-wearing was higher in areas with a higher population density (adjusted LOR =0.03 per one thousand/square mile, p=0.02) and lower in higher poverty areas (adjusted LOR= -0.01, p =.03). Disparities in adherence to mask wearing and physical distancing likely reflect differences in perception of risk by gender, age group, and race/ethnicity. While the risk of COVID-19 transmission is lower in outdoor settings, it is unlikely to be zero. The lower rates of mask use by males and minority groups suggest increased efforts are needed to enhance adherence to recommended guidelines.

7.
Talanta ; 233: 122609, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267932

ABSTRACT

Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a highly infectious respiratory illness that was caused by the SARS-CoV-2. It spread around the world in just a few months and became a worldwide pandemic. Quick and accurate diagnosis of infected patients is very important for controlling transmission. In addition to the commonly used Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection techniques, other diagnostic techniques are also emerging endlessly. This article reviews the current diagnostic methods for COVID-19 and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. It provides an important reference for the diagnosis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Pandemics , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2
8.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 723, 2021 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1183520

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global spread of the COVID-19 pandemic has become the most fundamental threat to human health. In the absence of vaccines and effective therapeutical solutions, non-pharmaceutic intervention has become a major way for controlling the epidemic. Gentle mitigation interventions are able to slow down the epidemic but not to halt it well. While strict suppression interventions are efficient for controlling the epidemic, long-term measures are likely to have negative impacts on economics and people's daily live. Hence, dynamically balancing suppression and mitigation interventions plays a fundamental role in manipulating the epidemic curve. METHODS: We collected data of the number of infections for several countries during the COVID-19 pandemics and found a clear phenomenon of periodic waves of infection. Based on the observation, by connecting the infection level with the medical resources and a tolerance parameter, we propose a mathematical model to understand impacts of combining intervention measures on the epidemic dynamics. RESULTS: Depending on the parameters of the medical resources, tolerance level, and the starting time of interventions, the combined intervention measure dynamically changes with the infection level, resulting in a periodic wave of infections controlled below an accepted level. The study reveals that, (a) with an immediate, strict suppression, the numbers of infections and deaths are well controlled with a significant reduction in a very short time period; (b) an appropriate, dynamical combination of suppression and mitigation may find a feasible way in reducing the impacts of epidemic on people's live and economics. CONCLUSIONS: While the assumption of interventions deployed with a cycle of period in the model is limited and unrealistic, the phenomenon of periodic waves of infections in reality is captured by our model. These results provide helpful insights for policy-makers to dynamically deploy an appropriate intervention strategy to effectively battle against the COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Humans
9.
Front Immunol ; 12: 640644, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133916

ABSTRACT

Infection with SARS-CoV-2 can lead to Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) and result in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Recent reports indicate an increased rate of fungal coinfections during COVID-19. With incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis and without any causative therapy available, secondary infections may be detrimental to the prognosis. We monitored 11 COVID-19 patients with ARDS for their immune phenotype, plasma cytokines, and clinical parameters on the day of ICU admission and on day 4 and day 7 of their ICU stay. Whole blood stimulation assays with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM), Aspergillus fumigatus, and Candida albicans were used to mimic secondary infections, and changes in immune phenotype and cytokine release were assessed. COVID-19 patients displayed an immune phenotype characterized by increased HLA-DR+CD38+ and PD-1+ CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and elevated CD8+CD244+ lymphocytes, compared to healthy controls. Monocyte activation markers and cytokines IL-6, IL-8, TNF, IL-10, and sIL2Rα were elevated, corresponding to monocyte activation syndrome, while IL-1ß levels were low. LPS, HKLM and Aspergillus fumigatus antigen stimulation provoked an immune response that did not differ between COVID-19 patients and healthy controls, while COVID-19 patients showed an attenuated monocyte CD80 upregulation and abrogated release of IL-6, TNF, IL-1α, and IL-1ß toward Candida albicans. This study adds further detail to the characterization of the immune response in critically ill COVID-19 patients and hints at an increased susceptibility for Candida albicans infection.


Subject(s)
Aspergillus fumigatus/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Candida albicans/immunology , Listeria monocytogenes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Aged , Cells, Cultured , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Susceptibility , Female , Humans , Immune Tolerance , Male , Middle Aged , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome
10.
Drugs Real World Outcomes ; 8(2): 131-140, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1077714

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several pharmacological agents, such as chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine, have been promoted for COVID-19 treatment or pre-exposure prophylaxis. However, no comprehensive evaluation of the safety of these possible agents is available, and is urgently needed. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the risks of cardiac adverse events associated with the possible pharmacotherapies for COVID-19, including certain antimalarial, antiviral, and antibiotic drugs. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conduced retrospective pharmacovigilance analyses of the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System database. The reporting odds ratio (ROR), a data mining algorithm commonly used in pharmacovigilance assessment, was generated to quantify the detection signal of adverse events. RESULTS: Among individuals without coronavirus infection from 2015 Q1 to 2020 Q1, increased risks for cardiac disorders were found for antiviral agents such as chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine (ROR: 1.68; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.66-1.70), lopinavir/ritonavir (ROR: 1.52; 95% CI 1.39-1.66), and antibiotics such as azithromycin (ROR: 1.37; 95% CI 1.30-1.44) and ceftriaxone (ROR: 1.92; 95% CI 1.80-2.05). Increased serious cardiac adverse events, including myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, and cardiac arrest, were also reported for these drugs. Further analyses of individuals with coronavirus infections revealed that 40% of individuals receiving chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine reported serious cardiac adverse events. Two cases resulted in QT prolongations and one case resulted in cardiac arrest. Chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin contributed to all the QT prolongation and cardiac arrest cases. CONCLUSIONS: The current pharmacotherapies for COVID-19 are associated with increased risks of cardiac adverse events. Variations in the cardiac safety profiles of these pharmacotherapies were also observed. Clinicians should closely monitor patients with COVID-19, especially those at high risk, using chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin.

11.
J Chem Inf Model ; 60(12): 5735-5745, 2020 12 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065777

ABSTRACT

The emergence of the new coronavirus (nCoV-19) has impacted human health on a global scale, while the interaction between the virus and the host is the foundation of the disease. The viral genome codes a cluster of proteins, each with a unique function in the event of host invasion or viral development. Under the current adverse situation, we employ virtual screening tools in searching for drugs and natural products which have been already deposited in DrugBank in an attempt to accelerate the drug discovery process. This study provides an initial evaluation of current drug candidates from various reports using our systemic in silico drug screening based on structures of viral proteins and human ACE2 receptor. Additionally, we have built an interactive online platform (https://shennongproject.ai/) for browsing these results with the visual display of a small molecule docked on its potential target protein, without installing any specialized structural software. With continuous maintenance and incorporation of data from laboratory work, it may serve not only as the assessment tool for the new drug discovery but also an educational web site for the public.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Computer Simulation , Databases, Pharmaceutical , Drug Design , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Protein Conformation , Small Molecule Libraries/chemistry , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacology , Software , Viral Proteins/metabolism
12.
Int J Infect Dis ; 104: 77-82, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065180

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: An increasing number of reports have observed thrombosis in severe cases of COVID-19. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of thromboembolism in mild/moderate cases of COVID-19. All of the patients had normal coagulation tests and none had any overt thrombotic complications. Our findings indicate that it is important to screen the thrombotic status of cases with mild/moderate COVID-19. METHODS: Between 11 June and 8 July 2020, 23 patients with mild/moderate COVID-19 pneumonia consented to having computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CPTA) and computed tomography venography (CTV) scans of the lungs and extremity veins. Doppler ultrasound (DUS) was also performed in all patients for screening. The incidence, clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations, imaging features, and prognosis, of patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) were analyzed and compared with those of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia without VTE. RESULTS: Nineteen patients (82.6%) had VTE, mainly distal limb thrombosis. Only one of the VTE patients was positive when screened by DUS; the other VTE patients were negative by DUS. All of the mild/moderate patients with VTE were screened by CTPA + CTV. Blood tests for inflammatory, coagulation, and biochemical, parameters were all within the normal range, except for WBC and LDH. CONCLUSIONS: When using CTV screening for DVT, we found that the incidence of thrombosis in patients with mild/moderate COVID-19 markedly increased to 82.6% (19/23). Screening for thrombosis is therefore important in patients with COVID-19. CTV is more sensitive than DUS for the detection of thrombosis. More research is now needed to evaluate the significance of thrombosis in COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Ultrasonography, Doppler , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnostic imaging
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(24)2020 12 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1011501

ABSTRACT

The U.S. has merely 4% of the world population, but contains 25% of the world's COVID-19 cases. Since the COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S., Massachusetts has been leading other states in the total number of COVID-19 cases. Racial residential segregation is a fundamental cause of racial disparities in health. Moreover, disparities of access to health care have a large impact on COVID-19 cases. Thus, this study estimates racial segregation and disparities in testing site access and employs economic, demographic, and transportation variables at the city/town level in Massachusetts. Spatial regression models are applied to evaluate the relationships between COVID-19 incidence rate and related variables. This is the first study to apply spatial analysis methods across neighborhoods in the U.S. to examine the COVID-19 incidence rate. The findings are: (1) Residential segregations of Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Black/African Americans have a significantly positive association with COVID-19 incidence rate, indicating the higher susceptibility of COVID-19 infections among minority groups. (2) Non-Hispanic Black/African Americans have the shortest drive time to testing sites, followed by Hispanic, Non-Hispanic Asians, and Non-Hispanic Whites. The drive time to testing sites is significantly negatively associated with the COVID-19 incidence rate, implying the importance of the accessibility of testing sites by all populations. (3) Poverty rate and road density are significant explanatory variables. Importantly, overcrowding represented by more than one person per room is a significant variable found to be positively associated with COVID-19 incidence rate, suggesting the effectiveness of social distancing for reducing infection. (4) Different from the findings of previous studies, the elderly population rate is not statistically significantly correlated with the incidence rate because the elderly population in Massachusetts is less distributed in the hotspot regions of COVID-19 infections. The findings in this study provide useful insights for policymakers to propose new strategies to contain the COVID-19 transmissions in Massachusetts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , Health Services Accessibility , Social Segregation , African Americans , Health Status Disparities , Hispanic Americans , Humans , Incidence , Massachusetts/epidemiology
15.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 17(24):9528, 2020.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-984386

ABSTRACT

The U.S. has merely 4% of the world population, but contains 25% of the world’s COVID-19 cases. Since the COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S., Massachusetts has been leading other states in the total number of COVID-19 cases. Racial residential segregation is a fundamental cause of racial disparities in health. Moreover, disparities of access to health care have a large impact on COVID-19 cases. Thus, this study estimates racial segregation and disparities in testing site access and employs economic, demographic, and transportation variables at the city/town level in Massachusetts. Spatial regression models are applied to evaluate the relationships between COVID-19 incidence rate and related variables. This is the first study to apply spatial analysis methods across neighborhoods in the U.S. to examine the COVID-19 incidence rate. The findings are: (1) Residential segregations of Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Black/African Americans have a significantly positive association with COVID-19 incidence rate, indicating the higher susceptibility of COVID-19 infections among minority groups. (2) Non-Hispanic Black/African Americans have the shortest drive time to testing sites, followed by Hispanic, Non-Hispanic Asians, and Non-Hispanic Whites. The drive time to testing sites is significantly negatively associated with the COVID-19 incidence rate, implying the importance of the accessibility of testing sites by all populations. (3) Poverty rate and road density are significant explanatory variables. Importantly, overcrowding represented by more than one person per room is a significant variable found to be positively associated with COVID-19 incidence rate, suggesting the effectiveness of social distancing for reducing infection. (4) Different from the findings of previous studies, the elderly population rate is not statistically significantly correlated with the incidence rate because the elderly population in Massachusetts is less distributed in the hotspot regions of COVID-19 infections. The findings in this study provide useful insights for policymakers to propose new strategies to contain the COVID-19 transmissions in Massachusetts.

16.
Laryngoscope ; 131(6): E2013-E2017, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-969763

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Intracellular entry of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) depends on the interaction between its spike protein with the cellular receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and depends on Furin-mediated spike protein cleavage and spike protein priming by host cell proteases, including transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2). As the expression of ACE2, TMPRSS2, and Furin in the middle and inner ear remain unclear, we analyzed the expression of these proteins in mouse ear tissues. STUDY DESIGN: Animal Research. METHODS: We performed immunohistochemical analysis to examine the distribution of ACE2, TMPRSS2, and Furin in the Eustachian tube, middle ear spaces, and cochlea of mice. RESULTS: ACE2 was present in the nucleus of the epithelium of the middle ear and Eustachian tube, as well as in some nuclei of the hair cells in the organ of Corti, in the stria vascularis, and the spiral ganglion cells. ACE2 was also expressed in the cytoplasm of the stria vascularis. TMPRSS2 was expressed in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in the middle spaces, with the expression being stronger in the nucleus in the mucosal epithelium of the middle ear spaces and Eustachian tube. TMPRSS2 was present in the cytoplasm in the organ of Corti and stria vascularis and in the nucleus and cytoplasm in the spiral ganglion. Furin was expressed in the cytoplasm in the middle ear spaces, Eustachian tube, and cochlea. CONCLUSIONS: ACE2, TMPRSS2, and Furin are diffusely present in the Eustachian tube, middle ear spaces, and cochlea, suggesting that these tissues are susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: NA Laryngoscope, 131:E2013-E2017, 2021.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Ear, Inner/pathology , Ear, Middle/pathology , Eustachian Tube/pathology , Furin/genetics , Gene Expression/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Animals , Cochlea/pathology , Epithelium/pathology , Immunohistochemistry , Mice , Mucous Membrane/pathology , Organ of Corti/pathology , Spiral Ganglion/pathology , Stria Vascularis/pathology , Temporal Bone/pathology
17.
BMJ Glob Health ; 5(11)2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917789

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Respiratory viruses (RVs) is a common cause of illness in people of all ages, at present, different types of sampling methods are available for respiratory viral diagnosis. However, the diversity of available sampling methods and the limited direct comparisons in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) make decision-making difficult. We did a network meta-analysis, which accounted for both direct and indirect comparisons, to determine the detection rate of different sampling methods for RVs. METHODS: Relevant articles were retrieved comprehensively by searching the online databases of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane published before 25 March 2020. With the help of R V.3.6.3 software and 'GeMTC V.0.8.2' package, network meta-analysis was performed within a Bayesian framework. Node-splitting method and I 2 test combined leverage graphs and Gelman-Rubin-Brooks plots were conducted to evaluate the model's accuracy. The rank probabilities in direct and cumulative rank plots were also incorporated to rank the corresponding sampling methods for overall and specific virus. RESULTS: 16 sampling methods with 54 438 samples from 57 literatures were ultimately involved in this study. The model indicated good consistency and convergence but high heterogeneity, hence, random-effect analysis was applied. The top three sampling methods for RVs were nasopharyngeal wash (NPW), mid-turbinate swab (MTS) and nasopharyngeal swab (NPS). Despite certain differences, the results of virus-specific subanalysis were basically consistent with RVs: MTS, NPW and NPS for influenza; MTS, NPS and NPW for influenza-a and b; saliva, NPW and NPS for rhinovirus and parainfluenza; NPW, MTS and nasopharyngeal aspirate for respiratory syncytial virus; saliva, NPW and MTS for adenovirus and sputum; MTS and NPS for coronavirus. CONCLUSION: This network meta-analysis provides supporting evidences that NPW, MTS and NPS have higher diagnostic value regarding RVs infection, moreover, particular preferred methods should be considered in terms of specific virus pandemic. Of course, subsequent RCTs with larger samples are required to validate our findings.


Subject(s)
Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Specimen Handling/methods , Bayes Theorem , Humans , Network Meta-Analysis
19.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 17718, 2020 10 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-880700

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has been widely spreading. We aimed to examine adaptive immune cells in non-severe patients with persistent SARS-CoV-2 shedding. 37 non-severe patients with persistent SARS-CoV-2 presence that were transferred to Zhongnan hospital of Wuhan University were retrospectively recruited to the PP (persistently positive) group, which was further allocated to PPP group (n = 19) and PPN group (n = 18), according to their testing results after 7 days (N = negative). Epidemiological, demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected and analyzed. Data from age- and sex-matched non-severe patients at disease onset (PA [positive on admission] patients, n = 37), and lymphocyte subpopulation measurements from matched 54 healthy subjects were extracted for comparison (HC). Compared with PA patients, PP patients had much improved laboratory findings. The absolute numbers of CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, and NK cells were significantly higher in PP group than that in PA group, and were comparable to that in healthy controls. PPP subgroup had markedly reduced B cells and T cells compared to PPN group and healthy subjects. Finally, paired results of these lymphocyte subpopulations from 10 PPN patients demonstrated that the number of T cells and B cells significantly increased when the SARS-CoV-2 tests turned negative. Persistent SARS-CoV-2 presence in non-severe COVID-19 patients is associated with reduced numbers of adaptive immune cells. Monitoring lymphocyte subpopulations could be clinically meaningful in identifying fully recovered COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/cytology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , T-Lymphocytes/cytology , Adult , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/cytology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/cytology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/metabolism , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism
20.
Parkinsons Dis ; 2020: 1216568, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-852753

ABSTRACT

Introduction: This study investigated the influence of lockdown during the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic on the quality of life of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods: We conducted a questionnaire survey involving 113 patients with PD from Xihu District, Hangzhou, Zhejiang. During the epidemic prevention and control period (February 1 to March 31, 2020), patients enrolled were asked to fill out questionnaires, including the "COVID-19 Questionnaire for PD Patients during the Period of Epidemic Prevention and Control" and "39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39)." During the phase of gradual release of epidemic prevention and control (April 1 to April 30, 2020), all patients were followed up again, and PDQ-39 questionnaires were completed. Results: The quality of life for patients during the period of epidemic prevention and control was worse than that after epidemic prevention and control (P < 0.001). The biggest problem that they faced was that they could not receive their doctor's advice or guidance regularly. The quality of life of patients who had difficulty getting doctors' guidance or those who changed their routine medication due to lockdown was even worse. Telemedicine was quite effective and efficient for patients to get doctors' guidance during lockdown. Conclusions: The inconvenient treatment during the pandemic directly caused the aggravation of patients' symptoms and the decline in their quality of life. It is suggested that social media (such as WeChat or Tencent QQ) are used for regular interactions and follow-up appointments for patients with inconvenient medical treatment.

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