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1.
British Journal of Social Work ; JOUR(7):4358-4377, 52.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2097319

ABSTRACT

This article aims to contribute to understanding the main social impacts of the pandemic caused by COVID-19 by highlighting the present and future challenges of social intervention and proposing a research agenda for social workers. Based on main indicators collected from international reports, we categorise the terms associated and analyse 284 Scopus articles that address social work issues in face of the COVID-19 through a text mining literature analysis. By applying topic modelling, we are able to identify relations within the body of knowledge between the main indicators. The results enable to highlight the current trends of research, contributing to leverage knowledge in social work in face of a complex and uncertain society. We find that most articles are focused on professional practice, as well as areas such as health, education and employment. In contrast, we argue that issues related to women or migrants have been less explored. These aspects could bring new perspectives in future research within the pandemic context.

2.
British Journal of Social Work ; JOUR(7):4089-4107, 52.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2097318

ABSTRACT

This study was intended to explore the experiences of social workers in Community Welfare Centres for People with Disabilities (CWCPDs) to understand their practices and challenges during COVID-19. It considered the essential role that CWCPD social workers play in responding to 'new normal' settings. Zoom interviews were conducted with twenty supervisory and manager-level social workers of CWCPDs nationwide. This study showed the unexpected cross-regional nature of risks and burdens. The high level of uncertainty and complexity allowed for the centres to operate safely under the COVID-19 legislation and for them to change and deliver alternative service provisions. Social workers had to develop new ways to deal with unprecedented risks, challenges, and dilemmas within 'the new normal'. COVID-19 means that centres must recalibrate their relationships with service users, communities and the government. CWCPDs need to change their service provision model from a large group-centred to a person-centred model to meet individual demands. Changes are needed in terms of clarity of communication, the application of step-by-step guidelines to service provisions and a shift away from an exclusive focus on quantitative performance needs in how centres are evaluated. In all these processes, both close cooperation and support from local authorities are needed.

3.
Hospital Employee Health ; JOUR(11):1-12, 41.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2092081

ABSTRACT

The article offers information that Telehealth services proved to be of great use to the Indian Health Service during the epidemic in both patient reach ing outlying places and in rising caregiver contentment.

4.
JDR Clin Trans Res ; : 23800844221123751, 2022 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064710

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore through focus groups (FGs) the perceptions of dental practitioners (DPs) from different countries of the challenges of implementing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) related biosafety measures, especially personal protection equipment (PPE), during the COVID-19 pandemic period. METHODS: DPs from Colombia, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States were invited to participate in country-based FGs. These were facilitated by an experienced moderator who explored the factors that guided the implementation of COVID-19 related biosafety measures and PPE use. Data were analyzed through thematic analysis on the basis of categories defined by the researchers deductively and inductively. RESULTS: A total of 25 DPs participated in 3 FGs (Colombia:n = 8; United Kingdom: n = 7; United States: n = 9) and 1 in an in-depth interview (Germany). DPs described using several processes to judge which guidance document to adopt and which aspects of the guidance were important in their practice. These included making judgments concerning the views of any indemnity organization to which the DPs were responsible, the staff's views in the practice, and the views of patients. In the absence of a single overarching guidance document, DPs filtered the available information through several considerations to find a level of PPE that they deemed "implementable" in local practice. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that the implementation of evidence-based practice is subject to modification through a lens of what is "feasible" in practice. KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER STATEMENT: Clinicians, educators, and policy makers can use the results of this study to understand the process through which guidance is transformed into implementable patient care pathways in the dental practice.

5.
New Jersey Nurse ; 52(4):10-10, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2058058
6.
Dental Update ; 49(8):615-615, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2056430
7.
New Solut ; 32(3): 223-229, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053671

ABSTRACT

The root causes of health care worker strain and depression include excessive job demands, extended work schedules, little decision-making opportunity, assault, bullying, and fear of injury. Potential links between working conditions and opioid overuse have also been discussed, beginning with psychological job strain or with physical pain leading to medication use. Promising solutions have been identified and many would be cost-effective, as enhanced working conditions could improve workers' mental health, job satisfaction, retention, and patient outcomes. Considering the number of health care workers leaving work during the global COVID-19 pandemic, it is urgent to address preventable root causes. In 2021, the US Congress called for educating health workers and first responders on the primary prevention of mental health conditions and substance use disorders. The CDC issued a Request for Information; this submission summarized research from CPH-NEW, a NIOSH Center of Excellence in Total Worker Health®, supplemented by a selective literature review.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , United States , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, U.S. , COVID-19/prevention & control , Occupational Stress/prevention & control
8.
Psychology and rural contexts: Psychosocial dialogues from Latin America ; : 131-142, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2047983

ABSTRACT

This chapter describes how indigenous people face the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic from a community approach. Through a documentary research, we advance in analyzing the living conditions of indigenous people in the pandemic, the ways of facing it, and the "new normalities" based on the psychosocial and community resources that these social actors have. A substantial finding is that the sense of "us" functions as a psychosocial and community strength to face the pandemic. The sense of "us" implies feeling, vocalizing, living, and having a conscience that brings people together at a time when the social and health conditions resulting from the pandemic have exposed inequality, inequity, the system of injustice, and poverty as a framework of capitalism that urges individualism over the commitment to the common good and the community. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

9.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; : 2126667, 2022 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2042489

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to investigate multi-dimensional psychological and social factors that influence the willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccine booster in China. A nationwide cross-sectional online survey was conducted between March and April 2022. A total of 6375 complete responses were received. The majority were of age 18 to 40 years old (80.0%) and college-educated (49.2%). In total, 79% responded extremely willing to receive a COVID-19 vaccine booster. By demographics, younger age, females, higher education, and participants with the lowest income reported higher willingness. Having a very good health status (odds ratio [OR] 3.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.92-4.34) and a higher score of vaccine confidence (OR 3.50, 95% CI 2.98-4.11) were associated with an increased willingness to receive a booster shot. Experiencing no side effects with primary COVID-19 vaccination (OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.89-3.20) and higher perceived susceptibility of COVID-19 infection (OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.92-2.95) were also associated with an increased willingness to receive a booster shot. A variety of psychosocial factors, namely having no chronic diseases, lower perceived concern over the safety of a booster shot, higher perceived severity of COVID-19 infection, and a higher level of institutional trust, were also significantly associated with greater willingness to get a booster shot. In conclusion, the present study adds evidence to the significant role of psychosocial factors in predicting COVID-19 vaccine booster acceptance and provides insights to design interventions to increase booster uptake in certain targeted demographic groups.

10.
Family Practice Management ; 29(5):12-16, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2033991

ABSTRACT

After the upheaval of the last two years, many physicians are reassessing their priorities. Coaching provides a framework for learning from the past to build a brighter future.

11.
Hospital Employee Health ; 41(9):100-102, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2033672

ABSTRACT

The article offers information about the moral injury faced by the healthcare workers in the U.S. It mentions that healthcare workers suffered a comparable level of mental turmoil and ethical conflict amid the Covid-19 pandemic. It discusses that potential moral injury associated with significantly higher depressive symptoms.

12.
Practising Midwife ; 25(8):26-30, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2026913

ABSTRACT

The perinatal period is a high risk for onset and relapse of mental health problems. The COVID-19 pandemic is a particularly stressful occurrence with reported negative impacts on perinatal mental health, hence the need to understand these impacts on pregnant and post-partum childbearing women and people, and prioritise interventions to alleviate them. This is the first of two articles.

14.
EUREKA: Social and Humanities ; - (4):67-81, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2026169

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) came as a rude shock to all. Its emergence was sudden and its attendant effects on psychosocial adjustment of all citizens especially among the Deaf were traumatic. Thus, the need to access the required information about the virus became necessary. While information about COVID-19 came from various media sources, television as an audio-visual material remains one of the most reliable sources of COVID-19 to the deaf. However, issues of quality assurance and comprehensibility of televised COVID-19 related information remain a concern among the deaf during the pandemic. Thus, as there is scarcity of research reports on such circumstances among the deaf, this study explores the perceived quality of and comprehensibility of televised sign language interpreted COVID-19 briefing by the Nigerian deaf. The motor theory of sign language perception was used as a theoretical lens in this study. An individualised semi-structured interview was used to gather data that was used to achieve an answer to the research objectives. Thematic content analysis was employed for data analysis. The following themes resulted from the analysis: visibility, incomplete interpretation, Camera handlers’/Television stations’ inadequate knowledge of deafness and deaf communication processes and partial comprehension of interpreted COVID-19 briefings. Camera handlers and technical crew must ensure adequately illuminated interpreters space and a contrasting backdrop of picture-in-picture is ensured. Also, SLIs should endeavour to use a transparent face shield or adopt the 1.5m–2.5m physical distancing rule

15.
British Journal of Child Health ; 3(4):199-203, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2025625

ABSTRACT

The last years have been characterised by disasters and tragic events, leading to an extremely negative news cycle. Stephanie Thornton discusses the impact this can have on children and young people's mental health and wellbeing.

16.
AI Practitioner ; 24(3):66-74, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2025569
17.
AI Practitioner ; 24(3):5-12, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2025567
18.
Emergency Nurse ; 30(5):10-10, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2025353

ABSTRACT

I used to love my job, but recently I have had to brace myself before starting a shift, as I wonder 'how much abuse am I going to suffer today?'.

19.
Cancer Nursing Practice ; 21(5):10-10, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2025350

ABSTRACT

As a nurse working in Gibraltar, I am often struck by just how many differences exist in nursing care developments there compared with mainland UK. Gibraltar, a British overseas territory, enjoys a unique position at the south western tip of Europe. Healthcare services are provided by the Gibraltar Health Authority to the approximately 34,000 residents and about a further 10,000 cross-frontier workers. The healthcare model is closely based on the NHS.

20.
Relations Industrielles ; 77(2), 2022.
Article in French | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2025308

ABSTRACT

L’objectif de cette recherche est de comprendre comment une entreprise peut mettre en place une stratégie de downsizing socialement responsable en temps de COVID-19. La visée de cette étude est de proposer une analyse fine des formes du downsizing en mettant l’accent sur son caractère distinctif dans les pays du Sud. Les résultats de l’étude qualitative, de nature exploratoire, menée au sein d’un établissement hôtelier en Tunisie mettent en exergue une série de mesures socialement responsables. Parmi ces pratiques à forte valeur ajoutée, figurent notamment la responsabilisation, la participation, l’accompagnement de proximité, la communication, la formation professionnelle, l’implication du syndicat et le respect de la législation sociale. Les conclusions soulignent que la mise en oeuvre d’un ensemble de préalables et de dispositifs avant, au cours et après le downsizing permet de limiter ses dégâts psychologiques et ses effets pervers. Aussi, elles révèlent que le déploiement de pratiques managériales bienveillantes, équitables et respectueuses de la dignité humaine, ainsi que l’adoption d’un agir éthique rendent le downsizing socialement toléré. Il est clair qu’il n’y a pas un modèle typique ou un « one best way » en matière de downsizing. Le recours à une approche ancrée dans les particularismes locaux est plus pertinent qu’un raisonnement en termes de meilleures pratiques universellement applicables. Le downsizing socialement responsable permet de concilier la rationalité psychosociale et la rationalité économique. Toutefois, il exige des concessions, des compromis parfois difficiles et s’appuie sur des équilibres précaires et des arrangements négociés. L’étude souligne qu’il est difficile d’enrayer les conséquences négatives du downsizing sur le plan humain, mais qu’il est nécessaire d’agir adéquatement et justement en faisant preuve de bienveillance et de responsabilité organisationnelle. Précis L’objectif de cette recherche est de comprendre comment l’entreprise peut mettre en place une stratégie de downsizing socialement responsable en temps de COVID-19. Les résultats de l’étude qualitative, de nature exploratoire, menée au sein d’un établissement hôtelier en Tunisie révèlent une série de pratiques socialement responsables qui confère un caractère distinctif à la stratégie de downsizing déployée. Les conclusions soulignent que la mise en oeuvre d’un ensemble de mesures avant, au cours et après le downsizing permet de limiter ses dégâts psychologiques et ses effets pervers. Aussi, elles révèlent que la mobilisation de pratiques managériales bienveillantes, équitables et respectueuses de la dignité humaine, ainsi que l’adoption d’un agir éthique et juste rendent le downsizing socialement toléré.Alternate :The objective of this research is to understand how the company can implement a socially responsible downsizing strategy in times of COVID-19. The aim of this study is to provide a detailed analysis of downsizing forms, emphasizing its distinctive character in southern countries. The results of our qualitative protocol, of an exploratory nature, carried out in a Tunisian hotel, revealed a mix of socially responsible measures. These high added-value practices include accountability, participation, local support, communication, professional training, union involvement and compliance with social legislation. The conclusions underlined that the implementation of a set of prerequisites and mechanisms before, during and after downsizing makes it possible to limit its psychological damage and its perverse effects. Also, they revealed that the deployment of benevolent managerial practices, fair and respectful of human dignity, as well as the adoption of an ethical guidelines have made downsizing socially tolerated. Clearly there is not a typical model or "one best way" when it comes to downsizing. The deployment of an approach rooted in local particularities is more relevant than reasoning in terms of universally applicable best practices. Socially responsible downsizing makes it possible to reconcile psychosocial rationality and economic rationality. However, it requires concessions, difficult compromises, and is based on precarious balances and negotiated arrangements. The study underscored that it is difficult to prevent the negative human consequences of downsizing, but that it is necessary to do things properly and fairly with kindness and organizational responsibility.

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