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1.
Int J Older People Nurs ; : e12509, 2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108134

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has significant impact on long-term care (LTC) residents' health and well-being. OBJECTIVES: This study investigated resident experiences of loneliness during the COVID-19 pandemic in Canadian LTC homes to offer lessons learned and implications. METHODS: 15 residents and 16 staff members were recruited from two large urban Canadian LTC homes with large outbreaks and fatalities. We used a telepresence robot to conduct one-on-one semi-structured interviews with participants remotely. We applied the Collaborative Action Research (CAR) methodology and report the early phase of CAR focused on collecting data and reporting findings to inform actions for change. Thematic analysis was performed to identify themes. RESULTS: Four themes were identified. The first two themes characterise what commonly generated feelings of loneliness amongst residents, including (1) social isolation and missing their family and friends and (2) feeling hopeless and grieving for lives lost. The second two themes describe what helped residents alleviate loneliness, including (3) social support and (4) creating opportunities for recreation and promoting positivity. CONCLUSIONS: Residents living in LTC experienced significant social isolation and grief during the pandemic that resulted in loneliness and other negative health consequences. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Promoting meaningful connection, safe recreational activities and a positive atmosphere in LTC homes during the pandemic may help mitigate residents' experiences of loneliness due to social isolation and/or grief and enhance their quality of life.

2.
Can J Aging ; : 1-18, 2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106268

ABSTRACT

A scoping review was conducted to identify patterns, effects, and interventions to address social isolation and loneliness among community-dwelling older adult populations during the COVID-19 pandemic. We also integrated (1) data from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA) and (2) a scan of Canadian grey literature on pandemic interventions. CLSA data showed estimated relative increases in loneliness ranging between 33 and 67 per cent depending on age/gender group. International studies also reported increases in levels of loneliness, as well as strong associations between loneliness and depression during the pandemic. Literature has primarily emphasized the use of technology-based interventions to reduce social isolation and loneliness. Application of socio-ecological and resilience frameworks suggests that researchers should focus on exploring the wider array of potential pandemic age-friendly interventions (e.g., outdoor activities, intergenerational programs, and other outreach approaches) and strength-based approaches (e.g., building community and system-level capacity) that may be useful for reducing social isolation and loneliness.

3.
Cureus ; 14(9): e29705, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100381

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite significant advancements in immunization over the last century, vaccine hesitancy is a major threat to world health. Health-related information available from a variety of sources, including new media such as social media platforms, can encourage vaccine hesitancy. The aim of this study is to determine the level of vaccine hesitation among adults, specifically their belief in the advantages of vaccination and their perceptions of vaccine-related dangers in relation to social media addiction and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) anxiety. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between December 2021 and January 2022, 454 adults participated in an online cross-sectional survey consisting of the social media use disorder scale, the vaccine hesitancy scale, and the coronavirus anxiety scale. RESULTS: The results of the study revealed a strong correlation between social media addiction, vaccine hesitation, and COVID-19 anxiety. CONCLUSION: Given the potential for misinformation to spread through social media, especially in a situation like a pandemic, the conscious use of social media should be emphasized and anti-addiction measures are required. Novel programs including online interventions should be developed to promote vaccination among social media addicts who have relatively high vaccination hesitancy.

4.
J Public Health Afr ; 13(3): 1728, 2022 Sep 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099988

ABSTRACT

Background: The spread of COVID-19 and the economic repercussions of several restrictive measures have worsened the lives of the Congolese and caused panic, fear, and anxiety. No study has yet examined the effect COVID-19's restrictive measures had on the quality of life in the Congo. Aims: The purpose of this study is to determine if the restrictive measures of COVID-19 are associated with the quality of life and the prevalence of anxiety and depression in Kinshasa. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in seventeen Kinshasa municipalities. N=100 adults over the age of 18 were recruited (41 females, 58 males and 1 prefer not). Social Contacts Assessment (SCA), Time Use Survey (TUS), Manchester Short Assessment of quality of life (MANSA), Health status EQ-5D-3L, UCLA Loneliness Scale; Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9); General Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) and COVID-19 related questions were utilized. We conducted descriptive statistics and multiple regression analyses. Results: suggest that depression and anxiety are more prevalent (PHQ-9 and GAD-7 scores were 9.1 (SD=6.8) and 8.5 (SD=6.1) respectively). Negative associations were found between the quality of life and living alone (B=-0.35, p=0.05) and mental health decline due to COVID- 19 (B=-0.30, p=0.04). Those who described themselves as less lonely reported a higher quality of life (B=0.34, p=0.03). Conclusions: Living alone is associated with a lower quality of life. This study fills a gap in the literature on public health in the DRC and low- and middle-income countries.

5.
BMC Med ; 20(1): 178, 2022 05 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1813341

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although social isolation has been associated with a higher mortality risk, little is known about the potential different impacts of face-to-face and non-face-to-face isolation on mortality. We examined the prospective associations of four types of social isolation, including face-to-face isolation with co-inhabitants and non-co-inhabitants, non-face-to-face isolation, and club/organization isolation, with all-cause and cause-specific mortality separately. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included 30,430 adults in Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (GBCS), who were recruited during 2003-2008 and followed up till Dec 2019. RESULTS: During an average of 13.2 years of follow-up, 4933 deaths occurred during 396,466 person-years. Participants who lived alone had higher risks of all-cause (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) 1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.49) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) (1.61; 1.20-2.03) mortality than those who had ≥ 3 co-habitant contact after adjustment for thirteen potential confounders. Compared with those who had ≥ 1 time/month non-co-inhabitant contact, those without such contact had higher risks of all-cause (1.60; 1.20-2.00) and CVD (1.91; 1.20-2.62) mortality. The corresponding AHR (95% CI) in participants without telephone/mail contact were 1.27 (1.14-1.42) for all-cause, 1.30 (1.08-1.56) for CVD, and 1.37 (1.12-1.67) for other-cause mortality. However, no association of club/organization contact with the above mortality and no association of all four types of isolation with cancer mortality were found. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort study, face-to-face and non-face-to-face isolation were both positively associated with all-cause, CVD-, and other-cause (but not cancer) mortality. Our finding suggests a need to promote non-face-to-face contact among middle-aged and older adults.


Subject(s)
Biological Specimen Banks , Cardiovascular Diseases , Aged , Cause of Death , Cohort Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Social Isolation
6.
J Appl Gerontol ; : 7334648221138283, 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098204

ABSTRACT

Using a mixed-method study design, we examined the effects of a socially assistive humanoid robot (SAHR), called Hyodol, on depressive symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of low-income, socially isolated older adults (N = 180). Quantitative outcomes were assessed at baseline (before Hyodol deployment) and at 3 and 6 months after baseline. Results showed reduced depressive symptoms and improved HRQOL at 3 months; however, these positive effects did not extend to 6 months. Ten focus group participants perceived Hyodol to be a valuable companion especially during the COVID outbreak. These results suggest that while Hyodol may have provided companionship for some low-income, socially isolated older adults during home confinement, its effects on depression and HRQOL were limited. Further research is needed to assess long-term effects of SAHRs as appropriate tools for reducing social isolation and improving behavioral health among community-dwelling older adults.

7.
Psychol Health Med ; : 1-11, 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097107

ABSTRACT

When coronavirus disease (COVID-19) news along with protective health recommendations first came to people's life, such ambiguous information became a public opinion. Performing protective behaviors can be regarded as an approval of the majority opinion as people have to alter their established health positions and practices. So far, the association between public opinion and protective health behaviors is unclear especially in the pandemic context. This study utilized a survey data collected between 1 and 10 April 2020 in Germany (n = 101), Austria (n = 261), Switzerland (n = 26), and China (n = 267). We compared the protective health behaviors between the Chinese and European participants, as well as examined the associations between the protective health behaviors, peer influence, and fear of social isolation. Protective health behaviors were found similar between Chinese and European participants, although being independent from peer influence and fear of social isolation were related to protective health behaviors in the Chinese sample. Our cross-national findings are consistent with previous studies, suggesting that both official and unofficial health communication show stronger influences in Asian populations. Findings from this study provide advice for public communication strategies to promote protective health behaviors during pandemics.

8.
Palliat Support Care ; : 1-4, 2022 May 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096598

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In addition to physical symptom burden, psychological suffering at end of life (EOL) is quite pervasive. As such, the interdisciplinary team in our Palliative and Supportive Care Unit strives to provide quality care sensitive to the physical and psychosocial needs of patients. Involving and allowing for the presence of family members is one way in which we afford our patients some additional comfort. Unfortunately, the current pandemic has placed limitations on this rather fundamental need for both patients and their family members. Here, we present a case illustrating the effects of visitor restrictions/isolation due to COVID-19 on the suffering of a patient at the EOL. CASE DESCRIPTION: A male in his 20s with a refractory hematologic malignancy decided to pursue a comfort-based approach to care after a rapid clinical deterioration. Due to visitor restrictions, he had to face this decision with limited support at the bedside, which caused significant distress. He was forced to choose among several immediate family members who would be at his side through his hospitalization, to be his advocate, at times his voice, his confidant, and the person to relay all information to those on the outside. He expressed a wish to be married before he died, which occurred in our palliative care unit. This life goal was one we would normally encourage those he loved to gather around him, but this was not possible. He passed peacefully two days after he was married. CONCLUSION: Although social limitations are necessary to help provide safety to the patients and staff in a hospital, they can have a direct impact on the suffering of patients and families at the EOL. Helping to maintain dignity, reflect on their life, and resolve any conflicts in the presence of family members is a benchmark for providing quality palliative care. Being barred from visitation due to isolation, threatens this care and lays the foundation for complicated grief among family members. Further research is needed to help balance the needs of those at the EOL with public safety. One such measure to help ease distress is to allow for more virtual visitation through electronic measures.

9.
Prev Med ; 164: 107329, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096171

ABSTRACT

Many studies have found adverse effects of the coronavirus disease pandemic on health. Irrespective of being infected by the coronavirus, lockdowns and other measures to restrict mobility have worsened an individual's subjective health assessment. Unlike previous studies, this study examined how pre-pandemic social isolation (in the form of no interaction with others and having no social support) affected the impact of the pandemic on self-rated health in Japan. To this end, we estimated fixed-effects models using 4172 observations of 2086 individuals obtained from a three-wave Internet nationwide survey conducted in January/February 2019 and February 2020 (before the pandemic), in March 2021 (when the pandemic-related state of emergency was effective in four prefectures and just after it was lifted in six prefectures), and in October/November (a full month after the state of emergency was lifted in all prefectures). The state of emergency raised the probability of reporting poor health by 17.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]:1.9-33.8) percentage points among the participants who had not interacted with others before the pandemic, compared with only 0.7 (95% CI: -3.1-4.5) percentage points among other participants. Similar results were obtained in the absence of social support prior to the pandemic. In conclusion, pre-pandemic social isolation was detrimental to health, suggesting that policy measures are needed to avoid social isolation to increase the resilience of public health to external shocks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Social Isolation
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090069

ABSTRACT

For almost two years, populations around the globe faced precariousness and uncertainty as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Older adults were highly affected by the virus, and the policies meant to protect them have often resulted in ageist stereotypes and discrimination. For example, the public discourse around older adults had a paternalistic tone framing all older adults as "vulnerable". This study aimed to measure the extent to which perceived age discrimination in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the sense of loneliness and social isolation, fear and perception of COVID-19 risks, had a negative effect on older adults' mental illness. To do so, a self-report questionnaire was administered to 1301 participants (average age: 77.25 years old, SD = 5.46; 56.10% females, 43.90% males). Descriptive and correlational analyses were performed, along with structural equation modelling. Results showed that perceived age discrimination in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic positively predicts loneliness and also indirectly predicts mental illness. In addition, loneliness is the strongest predictor of mental illness together with fear of COVID-19 and social isolation. Such results highlight the importance of implementing public policies and discourses that are non-discriminating, and that favour the inclusion of older people.


Subject(s)
Ageism , COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Loneliness , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation , Social Perception
12.
Geriatr Nurs ; 48: 220-224, 2022 Oct 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2083164

ABSTRACT

To reduce the spread of the Sars-CoV-2 virus, governments in many countries adopted a social isolation strategy. However, social isolation may adversely affect people's health, e.g., by decreasing the muscle function of lower limbs. We recruited 118 patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA) and 87 patients with moderate to severe hip joint osteoarthritis (OA) and measured hip muscle strength, hip joint pain, and walking ability from before to one year after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. During the pandemic, hip flexion (straight leg raise, SLR) strength decreased in 13.1% of patients in the post-THA group and 25.6% in the severe-OA group; in the severe-OA group, the decrease in SLR strength was mainly in patients aged 65 years and older. In addition, pain increased to mild or moderate and walkable distance decreased in more patients in the severe-OA group.

13.
Environment-Behaviour Proceedings Journal ; 7(21):207-214, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2082648

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has caused psychological impact on human being. This study is aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of depression, anxiety and stress among undergraduate students during COVID-19 pandemic. A cross-sectional survey using Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21 was conducted on 319 students. The results demonstrated that 21.6% -33% of the students had moderate to extremely severe depression, anxiety, and stress. The number of close friends and number of persons living at home were identified as their most significant predictors. These findings provide preliminary awareness towards understanding the mental health issue among college students during the COVID-19 pandemic.

15.
Rev. Univ. Ind. Santander, Salud ; 53: e300, dic. 2021. tab, graf
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2081181

ABSTRACT

Resumen Introducción: Los gobiernos al inicio de la pandemia, con el fin de mitigar y suprimir la propagación del virus implementaron medidas no farmacológicas ante la falta de vacunas y tratamientos farmacológicos efectivos. El gobierno colombiano emprendió acciones para controlar el contagio del COVID-19. Estas afectaron a la población y por ello el país requiere una evaluación profunda de la respuesta social ante la pandemia. Objetivo: Analizar la respuesta social a las medidas no farmacológicas para controlar la propagación del COVID-19 en Colombia. Metodología: Estudio exploratorio descriptivo transversal. El total de personas que respondieron la encuesta fue de 3549 adultos, entre el 8 y el 20 de abril de 2020. Resultados: En el país existen tres grupos de personas que han respondido a la pandemia de formas diferentes: quienes se resisten (34 %), quienes sufren (26 %) y quienes la aceptan (40 °%). En general, 90 % de las personas adoptó al menos una medida para protegerse, el 68 % adoptó más de tres medidas de higiene y autocuidado y un 60 °% implementó más de tres medidas de distanciamiento físico. Conclusiones: Al inicio de la pandemia, la ausencia de una vacuna hizo que las acciones individuales fueran tan importantes como las medidas implementadas por el gobierno. Sin embargo, pedagogía a nivel comunitario y el acceso a la información correcta, clara y concisa contribuyó con cambios de comportamientos positivos en la higiene, autocuidado y adherencia a medidas de distanciamiento, todo esto ha sido crucial para detener la propagación de COVID-19.


Abstract Introduction: At the beginning of the pandemic, governments implemented non-pharmacological measures to mitigate and suppress the spread of the virus in the absence of vaccines and effective pharmacological treatments. The Colombian government undertook actions to control the spread of COVID-19. These affected the population; therefore, the country requires a thorough evaluation of the social response to the pandemic. Objective: To analyze the social response to non-pharmacological measures to control the spread of COVID-19 in Colombia. Methodology: Cross-sectional descriptive exploratory study. The total number of people who responded to the survey was 3549 adults, between April 8 and 20, 2020. Results: There are three groups of people in the country who are responding to the pandemic in different ways: those who resist (34%), those who suffer (26%) and those who accept it (40%). Overall, 90% of people took at least one measure to protect themselves and others, 68% took more than three hygiene and self-care measures, 60% implemented more than three physical distancing measures. Conclusions: At the beginning of the pandemic, in the absence of a vaccine, individual actions are as important as measures implemented by the government. However, community-level education and access to correct, clear and concise information contributed to positive behavioral changes in hygiene, self-care and adherence to distancing measures, all of which are crucial to stop the spread of COVID-19.

16.
Rev. Pesqui. (Univ. Fed. Estado Rio J., Online) ; 14: e-11796, 2022. tab
Article in English, Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2072225

ABSTRACT

Objetivo: desvelar as percepções dos idosos sobre as repercussões da COVID-19 na terceira idade. Método: estudo exploratório, descritivo, com abordagem qualitativa. Participaram do estudo 20 idosos residentes em Santa Catarina, Brasil. A coleta de dados ocorreu por meio de questões semiestruturadas, através de vídeo chamada no WhatsApp® devido à pandemia. Para a organização e análise dos dados utilizou-se a análise de conteúdo. Resultados: emergiram duas categorias: 1) Sentimentos dos idosos despertados no enfrentamento da COVID-19; 2) Vivências dos idosos na conjuntura pandêmica. Conclusão: a situação pandêmica despertou sentimentos de tristeza, solidão, ansiedade, saudade e medo nos idosos, além de dificuldades na adaptação ao isolamento, frente ao distanciamento físico de familiares e amigos, com interrupção das atividades de lazer, trabalho e atividades físicas. Contudo, as tecnologias foram aliadas na manutenção do contato com outras pessoas, apesar das dificuldades no manuseio


Objective: to reveal the perceptions of the elderly about the repercussions of COVID-19 on the elderly. Method: exploratory, descriptive study with a qualitative approach. Twenty elderly residents in Santa Catarina, Brazil participated in the study. Data collection took place through semi-structured questions, through video call on WhatsApp due to the pandemic. For the organization and analysis of data, content analysis was used. Results: two categories emerged: 1) Feelings of the elderly awakened in the face of COVID-19; 2) Experiences of the elderly in the pandemic context. Conclusion: the pandemic situation aroused feelings of sadness, loneliness, anxiety, homesickness and fear in the elderly, in addition to difficulties in adapting to isolation, in the face of physical distancing from family and friends, with interruption of leisure, work and physical activities. However, technologies were allies in maintaining contact with other people, despite the difficulties in handling


Objetivo: revelar las percepciones de los ancianos sobre las repercusiones de la COVID-19 en los ancianos. Método: estudio exploratorio, descriptivo con abordaje cualitativo. Veinte ancianos residentes en Santa Catarina, Brasil, participaron del estudio. La recolección de datos se realizó a través de preguntas semiestructuradas, a través de videollamada en WhatsApp debido a la pandemia. Para la organización y análisis de los datos se utilizó el análisis de contenido. Resultados: surgieron dos categorías: 1) Sentimientos de los ancianos despertados frente a la COVID-19; 2) Experiencias de los adultos mayores en el contexto de la pandemia. Conclusión: la situación de pandemia despertó sentimientos de tristeza, soledad, ansiedad, nostalgia y miedo en los ancianos, además de dificultades para adaptarse al aislamiento, ante el distanciamiento físico de familiares y amigos, con interrupción del ocio, trabajo y actividades física. Sin embargo, las tecnologías fueron aliadas para mantener el contacto con otras personas, a pesar de las dificultades de manejo


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Aged , Social Isolation , Health of the Elderly , Coronavirus Infections
17.
Revista Argentina De Ciencias Del Comportamiento ; 14(2):75-86, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2068076

ABSTRACT

In Argentina, social isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic has had an impact on the practice of psychotherapy. The goal was to describe factors associated with the use of telepsychotherapy during social isolation. An online survey was conducted among 978 psychologists and psychiatrists from different provinces and the city of Buenos Aires. 77.7% of the participants started using online psychotherapy for the first time at the beginning of social isolation;62.6% of the participants treated half or more of their patients online. Significant relationships were detected between online psychotherapy and various factors that characterize psychotherapeutic practice, but these are weak effects. Participants with a higher percentage of patients in telepsychotherapy reported fewer treatment interruptions and similar or higher levels of income compared to those prior to social isolation. Drastic changes in psychotherapeutic practice during social isolation need to be studied in depth.

18.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 16(7):438-440, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067742

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Pandemics affect people in a defeatist manner and become stressful for people with relatives which need specific forms of care and attention. The study was conducted to find out if anxiety prevails among caretakers during the Covid-19 Pandemic as according to the literature review caregivers experience burden and fears related to their care-recipients and telerehabilitation. Material and Methods: The study used cross sectional survey and quantitative research.50 care-givers participated in the research where they filled online questionnaires inspired and derived from care-giver burden scale and beck anxiety inventory. Anxiety was clearly evident as most of the care-givers agreed to have feelings of nervousness 19 (38%), feeling anxious 18 (36%), feeling distressed 22 (44%), complaints about emotional burden 23 (43%) and 23 (46%) constant immersion in duties towards care-recipients. Results: SPSS tables depict the analyzed results and their interpretation. The results show 36%of the care-givers agreed that they face anxiety when a situation gets out of control, 44% were distressed about not getting enough help from healthcare team and other family and friends, 55% are apprehensive about their present condition and 46% are emotionally challenged and constantly immersed in duties owing to their family members. Conclusions: Anxiety and depression as a result of caregiving burden is common among care-givers and needs to be addressed as soon as possible. This makes it essential that health professionals pay heed and attention to develop interventions for care-givers and provide them with pertinent knowledge.

19.
Journal of Medical Sciences (Peshawar) ; 30(3):176-180, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067733

ABSTRACT

Objective: The current study has been designed to investigate the relationship between social isolation and mental illness and to identify the mediating role of resilience coping in adults. Method(s): The online data of 600 adults were recruited through a snowball sampling strategy. The age range of the participants was 18 years and above (M=25.64, SD=7.635). UCLA Loneliness Scale (Russel, 1996), Brief Resilience Coping Scale (Sinclair & Wallston, 2004), and Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995) were used. Result(s): Findings showed a significant positive association between social isolation and mental illness, while a negative association between social isolation and resilience coping. Additionally, resilience coping mediated the association between social isolation and mental illness [95% CI (LLCI:.0132, ULCI:.0802)]. Conclusion(s): Social isolation poses significant mental health risks and resilience coping can be used to improve mental illnesses. Copyright © 2022, Khyber Medical College. All rights reserved.

20.
British Journal of Midwifery ; 30(10):546-553, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2067259

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims: The COVID-19 pandemic significantly affected teaching for nursing and midwifery academics, as it shifted from face-to-face to online teaching from home. However, their experiences and how this impacted their ability to fulfil their academic roles has not been reported. This study investigated midwifery and nursing academics' working from home experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic and how this has impacted their ability to fulfil their academic roles. Methods: A qualitative approach was used for this study, analysing demographics and the answers to open-ended questions from 91 midwifery and nursing academics. Results: Six themes were derived: isolation, loneliness, work rituals, productivity, blurred boundaries and health and wellbeing. Generally, participants reported that they were more organised, focused and efficient, which gave them more time to spend with their families and pets. Most thought that they were more productive at home. However, the working environments for some participants were not ideal, as they were working in their kitchen or dining area, or in 'make-do' offices. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic posed new working challenges for academics, many of whom had worked from home for a few days, but then needed to work from home for extended periods because of lockdowns. Academics reported an overall positive outlook for working from home, as it enabled more family time and more productivity. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of British Journal of Midwifery is the property of Mark Allen Holdings Limited and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

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