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1.
Sport, Ethics and Philosophy ; JOUR: 1-13,
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2107132

ABSTRACT

Research on skateboarding has sought to define it, place it in a spatial-temporal schema, and analyse its social and cultural dimensions. We expand upon skateboarding's relationship with time using the Marxist theorist Henri Lefebvre's temporal science of Rhythmanalysis. With the disruption of urban social production of capital by the Covid-19 pandemic, we find skateboarding renewed in urban disjuncture from Capitalism and argue that this separation is central to its performance and culture. We propose that skateboarding is arrhythmic: discordant, out of step, and disruptive of the more predictable rhythms of everyday production of capital. Drawing on Lefebvre's concept of 'arrhythmia', we attempt re-conceive a beat and tempo of skateboarding: offbeat, juxtaposed, tilted, and contradictory. We emphasise that this discordance is not a malady but part of a broader beat ontology in skateboarding. This very discordance also raises questions about the continued incorporation of skateboarding into competitive sports, wellbeing, and prosocial paradigms and reminds theorists that skateboarding continues to be unkempt, subversive and tacitly political.

2.
Egyptian Journal of Anaesthesia ; JOUR(1):629-635, 38.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2107025

ABSTRACT

Background Critically ill COVID-19 patients are at risk of developing major complications with high mortality rate. Aspirin might have favorable effects in severe COVID-19 via various mechanisms besides inhibition of platelet aggregation. The role of aspirin as adjuvant therapy in critically ill patients with COVID-19 has not been studied. In this study, we investigated the correlation between aspirin use and the clinical outcome in critically ill COVID-19 patients. Methods This is a retrospective cohort observational study of critically ill COVID-19 Egyptian patients. Participants were divided into two groups: patients who received aspirin, 150 mg per day orally, upon admission to the intensive care unit, and those who did not. The primary outcome in this study was the shift to invasive ventilatory support. Results A total of 1190 patients were involved in the study, 660 patients received aspirin, while 530 patients did not. Among aspirin group compared to non-aspirin group, invasive ventilatory support, DVT, PE, stroke, ACS, ARDS, AKI, septic shock, and mortality were less frequent, and the differences were significant except for ACS, AKI, and septic shock. Major bleeding was non-significantly more frequent. The length of ICU stay was significantly longer among non-survivors, and shorter among survivors. The variations between the two groups were significant among subgroups >= 40 or 60. Conclusions In critically ill patients with COVID-19, aspirin has the potential role as an adjuvant therapeutic, lowering the risk of mechanical ventilation, thromboembolic events, ARDS, and ICU mortality. Patients older than 40 years were a significant category that might benefit from aspirin.

3.
Public Integrity ; JOUR: 1-15,
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2107023

ABSTRACT

In 2020, the world witnessed the worst pandemic in more than a century that continues to impact and stigmatize minorities and immigrants disproportionately. During this time Asian Americans in the United States (US) have been subject to racist tropes, xenophobic attacks, and widespread hate crimes. The xenophobia and racism experienced by this group are not new, as demonstrated in this study. The injustices experienced by Asians in the US are embedded within the historical, social, political, and cultural structures that discriminate and are present throughout minority history. Unfortunately, scholars in the US Public Administration often underutilize a historical lens to study oppression, racism, and xenophobia. This essay provides key historical accounts of how Asian Americans experience othering while at the same time are perceived as model minorities. We will examine the history of "otherness" experienced by Asian Americans in the US from two key lenses: (1) disease and the other (2) labor and immigration policies.

4.
Mathematical Thinking and Learning ; JOUR(4):331-335, 24.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2107022

ABSTRACT

This introductory paper first summarizes the major accomplishments of the literature on data modeling, modeling with software and the integration of statistical and computational thinking in statistical modeling, including how these collective efforts have helped the field evolve. Next, challenges that the field must address and general suggestions for future research are discussed. Finally, it is important to note that the papers in this special issue were in their final editing stages in early to mid-2020, at which time there were an unprecedented confluence of global crises: Covid-19, Civil Unrest over Racism, and Climate Change. Although the papers were written prior to Covid-19, it would be remiss not to discuss some of the important themes cultivated in this special issue in light of current events, particularly around the relationship between the non-neutral nature of data and ideas of data, context and chance in statistical modeling. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

5.
Journal of Community Practice ; JOUR(4):378-394, 30.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2106991

ABSTRACT

Professionals such as social workers, public health officials, cultural networkers, researchers, and community leaders, who are designing and implementing programs and policies, can look to youth to gain a unique perspective on promoting community health. Across the United States, many communities experience inadequate access to nutritious foods that exacerbate poor health outcomes for marginalized populations - people of color, older or disabled adults, and those with lower education or income. To address food access disparities, providing youth voice and building youth empowerment may offer creative strategies to encourage community change. The Youth CAN (Change.Activity.Nutrition) project aimed to engage and empower adolescents to become agents of change for health within their community. Youth became active researchers through participatory action research (PAR) using socially engaged art platforms such as photovoice (photography), street art (graffiti-style art), and spoken word (poetry) to explore their environment and identify facilitators and barriers to healthy eating within their community. The World Cafe activity facilitated conversation among youth and adults to generate ideas to improve community food access. Collaboration between adult and youth researchers, and community leaders led to proposed solutions for improving access to healthy foods within an urban, low-income neighborhood. The Youth CAN project demonstrated how engaging and empowering youth through PAR is fundamental in promoting positive youth development and enabling youth to become advocates for equitable food access in their communities.

6.
International Journal of Early Years Education ; JOUR: 1-23,
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2106945

ABSTRACT

This study analyzes Indonesian children’s happiness feeling and preferences toward school-from-home activities and setting during the COVID-19 pandemic. Online interviews and drawing-telling activities were used to obtain the data from 334 children aged four to six years. The findings revealed that more than half of the children were happy with the school-from-home policy. They stated that they were allowed to conduct unstructured free play at home besides completing the assignments from the teachers. Older children, 6 years old, preferred the school setting, as they could get themselves engaged in social interaction with their surroundings. In conclusion, adults should consider children’s voices, as part of an effort in enhancing their academic well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. [ FROM AUTHOR]

7.
Accounting Education ; JOUR: 1-22,
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2106942

ABSTRACT

A key role of universities is the credentialing of student learning by awarding degrees and diplomas. This requires universities to have confidence in the integrity of their assessment processes and in turn, external stakeholders to have the same confidence. This study investigates the following research question: 'Has COVID-19 had an impact on the assessment and invigilation of accounting courses in Australia and New Zealand and, if so, how?' This is a critical issue for accounting faculty in many countries as COVID-19 has forced a shift in the way assessments are administered - from face to face to online. The study involved a survey of accounting faculty in Australia and New Zealand and found changes occurred to how students were assessed because of COVID-19 and a variety of institutional responses to this. The paper makes recommendations for accounting educators, universities, and the professional accounting bodies.

8.
Studies in Psychology ; JOUR(2):311-331, 43.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2106841

ABSTRACT

(Spanish) La Escala de Soledad de Tres Items (Three-Item Loneliness Scale, TIL) es un instrumento breve ampliamente utilizado para la evaluacion de la soledad. El proposito de este estudio fue analizar las propiedades psicometricas de la version espanola de la Escala TIL con datos de dos estudios diferentes. En el Estudio 1, 1,536 adultos con edades comprendidas entre 18 y 88 anos completaron una encuesta durante el periodo de confinamiento debido a la pandemia de la COVID-19. En el Estudio 2, 314 personas mayores con edades comprendidas entre 60 y 92 anos fueron evaluados antes del inicio de la pandemia del COVID-19. Se obtuvieron cargas factoriales significativas mediante el analisis factorial confirmatorio para ambas muestras. La consistencia interna para la escala en ambas muestras fue aceptable. Tambien se hallaron asociaciones positivas entre la Escala TIL y un item unico que media soledad y la sintomatologia depresiva y ansiosa. Los hallazgos respaldan el uso de la Escala TIL con las poblaciones hispanoparlantes. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

9.
International Journal of Comparative & Applied Criminal Justice ; JOUR: 1-16,
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2106833

ABSTRACT

As the world continues to struggle with the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been much speculation on the impact of the virus on crime rates, especially domestic violence. Researchers have largely adopted a routine activities explanation for increased levels of domestic violence, where disruptions in patterns of daily life caused by lockdowns increased the opportunity for such events to occur. The purpose of this manuscript was to utilise emerging hot spot analysis to explore spatiotemporal changes in the number of calls for service for domestic disturbance from 1 March 2020 – 31 December 2020 in the City of Tampa, FL USA based on critical time frames for restrictions and recovery. As predicted by opportunity theory, there was a statistically significant decline in the counts of calls over the 10-month period. Additionally, sporadic hot spots were found at some locations during times of heightened restrictions. Locations with sporadic hot spots coincided with census tracts reporting lower education levels;higher levels of poverty, unemployment, single parent households;and more minority residents. [ FROM AUTHOR]

10.
Southern Communication Journal ; JOUR: 1-10,
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2106806

ABSTRACT

As the COVID-19 pandemic swept America in 2020, schools closed and families shifted to children learning online from home. This labor was dominantly covered by mothers, many of whom still had careers to maintain. A 2020 New York Times article reporting on the homeschooling shift concluded with the polarizing declaration that while women did most of the labor associated with homeschooling, men did not perceive the gender imbalance. Guided by a critical feminist lens, the authors examined the comments posted in the article's comment section to unpack the discourse. Western society places pressure on women to flawlessly perform motherhood and other tasks simultaneously;as such, the COVID-19 pandemic provided a context rich for further subjugation and subordination of pink-collar work.

11.
Journal of Further & Higher Education ; JOUR(9):1290-1303, 46.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2106783

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 global pandemic precipitated migration to online learning and teaching for students and universities. This study explored the change in self-identification in an academic role through the significant disruption caused by the urgent migration from on-campus teaching to online teaching in the face of lockdowns designed to limit the spread of the virus. Drawing upon identity theory, this study explored the impact of the swift change in work practices on the academic identities of staff (n = 33) at a UK university. Three themes were identified: identity disruption, sensemaking and nostalgia for what had been lost. Hearing directly from academics is important because academic identity, in an increasingly neoliberal sector, was already a topic of interest, with tension and insecurity affecting work practices, including interactions with students. The experiences of the disrupted academic sessions could result in significant changes in practice, and a re-shaping of the academic role to build upon online pedagogies, interactions with students, and peers. If so, what it means to be an academic will change with consequent implications for prioritisation, workloads, attracting and retaining academics, and student experience. The themes arising from this study are discussed and implications for future practice are presented. [ FROM AUTHOR]

12.
Journal of Language and Politics ; JOUR(6):890-918, 21.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2106742

ABSTRACT

Since the pandemic broke out in 2020, China has widely presented the covid crisis in its mass media and actively constructed collective identity thereof to mobilize medical workers, unify political stances, boost domestic solidarity, and promote international support. This paper combines the Discourse-Historical Approach and a multimodal perspective to investigate how the Chinese state-run news agency People's Daily discursively achieves these purposes on TikTok. A combination of qualitative and quantitative methods is used to present the high-frequency topoi of justifying the crisis and referential and predicational strategies of shaping collective identity within, which can fall into four dimensions: positive Self, negative Self, negative Others, and positive Others. The linguistic resources can be intensified/mitigated by visual-aural ensembles, which can draw the audience's attention and arouse their emotional attachments. This study also summarizes the embedded values in the discourses and situates them in socio-political contexts.

13.
Journal of Asset Management ; JOUR
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2106632

ABSTRACT

Documenting the interlinkages among assets that are widely used to hedge against inflation is crucial for investors, as the necessity to protect the investment portfolio is stronger under inflationary conditions. For this purpose, we investigate the volatility spillovers between treasury inflation-protected securities (TIPS) and a battery of other assets perceived as inflation hedges, including bonds, gold, real estate, oil and equities. The applied methodology comprehends the time-varying parameter vector autoregressive (TVP-VAR) extension of the Diebold and Yilmaz (Int J Forecast 28:57-66, 2012, 10.1016/j. ijforecast.2011.02.006) approach for the period 1/1/2010-3/31/2022. Our results indicate that the assets under consideration are moderately interconnected and subjected to several exogenous shocks, such as the US-China trade war, the COVID-19 pandemic and the Russia-Ukraine war. Furthermore, we assess the hedging effectiveness of TIPS against each asset by estimating hedge ratios and optimal portfolios weights, before and after the spread of COVID-19 pandemic, by using conditional variance estimations (DCC-GARCH). The empirical findings show that the short position in the volatility of TIPS is proved to be an excellent hedge for all the sampled assets, with the exception of short-term Treasury bonds, and their hedging ability was improved during COVID-19.

14.
Journal of Pediatric Genetics ; JOUR
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2106604

ABSTRACT

A 7-year-old girl with recurrent episodes of pancreatitis with risk factor of poorly controlled hyperglyceridemia presented with an acute episode of pancreatitis. She was managed conservatively and underwent whole exome sequencing which showed a likely pathogenic LPL gene mutation. Incidentally, she was diagnosed with COVID-19 on screening, which we hypothesize to have triggered the recent episode. On further examination, she was found to have bilateral cataracts. Her hypercholesterolemia was effectively managed with dietary therapy, high dose omega 3, and gemfibrozil. Our case report sensitizes the clinician to use a modern diagnostic tool such as whole exome sequencing in children with recurrent pancreatitis where hypertriglyceridemia is a known risk factor. This child is the first case of LPL mutation reported in India.

15.
Aktuelle Rheumatologie ; JOUR
Article in German | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2106579

ABSTRACT

The orchestral interaction between endothelial dysfunction, activated thrombocytes and other immune cells as well as the concomitant activation of complement lead to simultaneous activation of the immune system and coagulation. An uncontrolled persistence of these physiological mechanisms can induce pathological processes of thromboinflammation. This review article aims to summarise mechanisms leading to thromboinflammation as a cause of venous thromboembolism.

16.
Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia ; JOUR
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2106551

ABSTRACT

This special article is the fifteenth in an annual series for the Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia. The authors thank the editor-in-chief, Dr. Kaplan, and the editorial board for the opportunity to continue this series, namely the research highlights of the past year in the specialty of cardiothoracic and vascular anesthesiology.1 The major themes selected for 2022 are outlined in this introduction, and each highlight is reviewed in detail in the main body of the article. The literature highlights in the specialty for 2022 begin with an update on COVID-19 therapies, with a focus on the temporal updates in a wide range of therapies progressing from medical, to the utilization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and ultimately with lung transplantation in this high-risk group. The second major theme is focused on medical cardiology, with the authors discussing new insights into the life cycle of coronary disease, heart failure treatments, and outcomes related to novel statin therapy. The third theme is focused on mechanical circulatory support, with discussions focusing on both right and left-sided temporary support outcomes and optimal timing of deployment. The fourth, and final theme is an update on cardiac surgery, with discussion of diverse aspects of concomitant valvular surgery and optimal approach to procedural treatment for coronary arterial disease. The themes selected for this fifteenth special article are only a few of the diverse advances in the specialty during 2022. These highlights will inform the reader of key updates on a variety of topics, leading to improvement of perioperative outcomes for patients with cardiothoracic and vascular disease.

17.
Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology ; JOUR
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2106372

ABSTRACT

Conspiracy theories widely influence our social and political lives. A recent example is the broad impact such theories had on government's efforts to halt the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. In that context, public's compliance and willingness to get vaccinated was found to be substantially and negatively affected by the belief in conspiracy theories, among various factors. In the present study, we tested whether some countries are more susceptible to conspiracy theories than others. We examined, for the first time, the idea that the degree of intensity of conflict predicts the degree of belief in COVID-19 conspiracy theories. A multilevel analysis across 66 countries (N = 46,450) demonstrated that people living in countries with higher conflict intensity tended to be more susceptible to COVID-19 conspiracy beliefs. These findings are the first large-scale comparative evidence of the profound psychological effects of conflicts on the involved societies.

18.
Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition ; JOUR
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2106370

ABSTRACT

In 2020, the world was amid a global health crisis-the COVID-19 pandemic. Nations had varying levels of morbidity and mortality and adopted different measures to prevent the spread of infection. Effects of the pandemic on spontaneous (rather than voluntary) past and future thoughts remain unexplored. Here, we report data from a multicountry online study examining how both country- and individual-level factors are associated with this core aspect of human cognition. Results showed that national (stringency of measures) and individual (attention to COVID-related information and worry) factors separately and jointly predicted the frequency of people's pandemic-related spontaneous thoughts. Additionally, no typical positivity biases were found, as both past and future spontaneous thoughts had a negative emotional valence. This large-scale multinational study provides novel insights toward better understanding the emergence and qualities of spontaneous past and future thoughts. Findings are discussed in terms of the determinants and functions of spontaneous thought. General Audience Summary The COVID-19 pandemic was a global phenomenon;people in countries across the world experienced the pandemic similarly, but did it affect the way we perceived the past and future? This study reports whether and how people experienced spontaneous thoughts about the past and future of the pandemic-that is, images of the past or future that appear in mind without warning and with little effort (e.g., remembering a recent lockdown or imagining a future announcement)-during the pandemic's first wave. Spontaneous past and future thoughts are important in daily life and can indicate poor mental health when negative in nature. Here, for the first time, we asked people from 14 different countries across four continents to report the frequency and emotional characteristics of their spontaneous past and future pandemic-related thoughts in the first wave of the pandemic. The study showed that the national context (in particular, COVID regulations) predicted the frequency of people's spontaneous thoughts about the pandemic. Emotional aspects of these thoughts were predicted by individual factors such as isolation, worry, attention to COVID-related information, and impact of COVID-19 on everyday life, in addition to national factors. Finally, in contrast to previous research showing a "positive bias," which is thought to be beneficial, past and future spontaneous pandemic-related thoughts had a negative emotional tone. This study allowed us to demonstrate that the tendency to experience spontaneous thoughts about an ongoing international event can be predicted by societal context, which may be valuable for examining the social predictors of spontaneous emotional thoughts about the past and future. The study also characterized the negative tone of past and future spontaneous thoughts about the pandemic, and future studies will be needed to examine the longer term consequences of these effects.

19.
Journal of Public Policy ; JOUR: 1-26,
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2106254

ABSTRACT

How has public healthcare spending prepared countries for tackling the COVID-19 pandemic? Arguably, spending is the primary policy tool of governments for providing effective health. We argue that the effectiveness of spending for reducing COVID deaths is conditional on the existence of healthcare equity and lower political corruption because the health sector is particularly susceptible to political spending. Our results, obtained using ordinary least squares and two-stage least squares estimations, suggest that higher spending targeted at reducing inequitable access to health has reduced COVID deaths. Consistent with the findings of others, our results indirectly suggest that health spending is necessary, but not sufficient unless accompanied by good governance and equitable access. Equitable health systems ease the effects of COVID presumably because they allow states to reach and treat people more effectively. Spending aimed at increasing health system capacity by increasing access thus seems a sound strategy for fighting the spread of disease, ultimately benefiting us all.

20.
Journal of Management & Organization ; JOUR: 1-21,
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2106253

ABSTRACT

Responding to the call for more research on cognitive crafting, this study focuses on employees' reframing of their job characteristics to assign higher importance to job resources and downplay the relevance of costly job demands. Furthermore, it examines how these proactive cognitive strategies are embedded in an overall job crafting process, including both cognitive and behavioral aspects, and linked with work engagement. Preliminary results (n = 247) support the conceptualization of cognitive crafting encompassing approach and avoidance aspects targeting resources and demands, respectively. Moreover, three-wave data (n = 84) show that employees' cognitive efforts to highlight the centrality of job resources influence work engagement over time. Importantly, proactively organizing work leads to higher work engagement by prompting cognitive reframing of the relevance of job resources as central to one's work. Differently, cognitive efforts to downplay the relevance of hindering job demands are unrelated to following proactive behaviors and work engagement.

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