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1.
Archives of Academic Emergency Medicine ; 10(1):21, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1887402

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Knowledge of vaccine-related adverse events is crucial as they are among the most important factors that cause hesitation in receiving vaccines. Therefore, we aimed to systematically review the adverse events related to the mRNA vaccines reported in the literature. Methods: A systematic literature search was carried out in the databases of Scopus, PubMed, Cochrane, and Web of Science. We selected original studies that explored the side effects of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines using a two-phase (title/ and full-text) screening process. Results: Cardiac complications were the most commonly reported severe adverse events. It appeared that systemic adverse reactions are more common after the second dose of vaccines. The number of adverse effects reported after the Pfizer vaccine was higher than other vaccines, mostly due to its earlier approval and more widespread use throughout the world. Cardiac adverse events had a higher prevalence but no significant association has been found between COVID-19 mRNA vaccines and cardiac adverse events except for myopericarditis. Conclusion: Vaccines play a crucial role in controlling the COVID-19 pandemic and decreasing mortalities and the results of the present review acknowledge the fact that the benefits outweigh the adverse events of these vaccines.

2.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 13: 850328, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869368

ABSTRACT

Background and Objective: Nonthyroidal Illness Syndrome (NTIS) occurs in approximately 70% of patients admitted to Intensive Care Units (ICU)s and has been associated with increased risk of death. Whether patients with NTIS should receive treatment with thyroid hormones (TH)s is still debated. Since many interventional randomized clinical trials (IRCT)s were not conclusive, current guidelines do not recommend treatment for these patients. In this review, we analyze the reasons why TH treatment did not furnish convincing results regarding possible beneficial effects in reported IRCTs. Methods: We performed a review of the metanalyses focused on NTIS in critically ill patients. After a careful selection, we extracted data from four metanalyses, performed in different clinical conditions and diseases. In particular, we analyzed the type of TH supplementation, the route of administration, the dosages and duration of treatment and the outcomes chosen to evaluate the results. Results: We observed a marked heterogeneity among the IRCTs, in terms of type of TH supplementation, route of administration, dosages and duration of treatment. We also found great variability in the primary outcomes, such as prevention of neurological alterations, reduction of oxygen requirements, restoration of endocrinological and clinical parameters and reduction of mortality. Conclusions: NTIS is a frequent finding in critical ill patients. Despite several available IRCTs, it is still unclear whether NTIS should be treated or not. New primary endpoints should be identified to adequately validate the efficacy of TH treatment and to obtain a clear answer to the question raised some years ago.


Subject(s)
Euthyroid Sick Syndromes , Critical Illness/therapy , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Thyroid Hormones/therapeutic use
3.
Giornale italiano di nefrologia : organo ufficiale della Societa italiana di nefrologia ; 39(2), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1856897

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Some hemodialysis patients are reluctant to undergo COVID-19 vaccination for the fear of developing adverse events (AEs). The aim of this study was to verify the safety of the mRNA-1273 vaccine in hemodialysis patients. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of in-center hemodialysis patients who underwent mRNA-1273 vaccine from March 1st to April 30th, 2021. All AEs occurring after the first and the second doses were collected and classified as local or systemic. Results: Overall, 126 patients on chronic maintenance dialysis without a prior COVID-19 diagnosis were vaccinated with two doses of mRNA-1273 vaccine. Mean age was 68 (IQR, 54,7-76) years and 53.6% of patients were aged ≥65 years. During the observational period of 68 (IQR, 66-70) days, AEs occurred in 57.9% and 61.9% of patients after the first dose and second dose, respectively. The most common AEs were: injection-site pain (61.9%), erythema (4.8%), itching (4.8%), swelling (16.7%), axillary swelling/tenderness (2.4%), fever (17.5%) headache (7.9%), fatigue (23.8%), myalgia (17.5%), arthralgia (12.7%), dyspnoea (2.4%), nausea/vomiting (7.1%), diarrhoea (5.6%), shivers (4%) and vertigo (1.6%). The rates of local AEs were similar after the first and second doses (P=0.8), whereas systemic AEs occurred more frequently after the second dose (P=0.001). Fever (P=0.03), fatigue (P=0.02) and nausea/vomiting (P=0.03) were significantly more frequent after the second dose of the vaccine. There were no age-related differences in the rate of AEs. Overall, vaccine-related AEs in hemodialysis patients seem to be lower than in the general population. Conclusion: The RNA-1273 vaccine was associated with the development of transient AEs after the first and second doses in patients on chronic maintenance hemodialysis. They were mostly local, whereas systemic AEs were more prevalent after the second dose. Overall, all AEs lasted for a few days, without any apparent sequelae. Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

4.
Infect Drug Resist ; 15: 2469-2474, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1855195

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the response and safety of an inactivated vaccine (Sinovac Life Sciences Co., Ltd., Beijing, China) for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in liver transplant (LTx) recipients from China. Patients and Methods: Thirty-five recipients post LTx from the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine who received inactivated vaccine from June to October 2021 were screened. Information regarding vaccine side effects and clinical data were collected. Results: Thirty-five LTx recipients were enrolled, with a mean age of 46 years, and most patients were male (30, 85.71%). All the participants had a negative history of COVID-19 infection. Predictors for negative response in the recipients were interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) induction during LTx, shorter time post LTx and application of a derivative from mycophenolate acid (MPA). No serious adverse events were observed during the progress of vaccination or after the vaccination. Conclusion: LTx recipients have a substantially partial immunological response to the inactivated vaccine for COVID-19. IL-2R induction during LTx, a shorter time post LTx and the application of a derivative from MPA seem to be predictors for a negative serological immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody response in recipients. The findings require booster vaccination in these LTx recipients.

5.
Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences ; 38(5), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1847724

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To investigate the effects of lymphocyte (LY), C-reactive protein (CRP) and prealbumin (PA) levels on the clinical typing and course of disease in children infected with novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) at the early stage. Methods: A total of 140 children with 2019-nCoV infection diagnosed in Shijiazhuang People's Hospital and Hebei Provincial Chest Hospital from January 2021 to February 2021 were selected for this study. According to the clinical symptoms, laboratory results and imaging examination, the children were divided into asymptomatic infection group, mild infection group and common infection group. The levels of white blood cell (WBC), LY, CRP, PA, albumin (ALB), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatine kinase (CK) and creatine kinase MB isoenzyme (CKMB) in the children were recorded on the 2nd d after the positive detection of 2019-nCoV nucleic acid. Results: There were 73(52.1%) children in the asymptomatic infection group, 35(25.0%) children in the mild infection group and 32(22.9%) children in the common infection group. LY level in the common infection group was lower than that in the asymptomatic infection group and the mild infection group (F= 3.152, both p< 0.05). CRP level in the common infection group was higher than that in the asymptomatic infection group and the mild infection group (F= 6.343, both p< 0.05). CRP level in the mild infection group was higher than that in the asymptomatic infection group (t= 2.052, p< 0.05). PA level in the common infection group and the mild infection group was lower compared with the asymptomatic infection group (F= 5.229, both p< 0.05). WBC, ALB, AST, ALT, CK and CKMB levels in the three groups showed no statistical significance (F= 1.803, F= 1.208, F= 2.391, F= 1.973, F= 0.401, F= 1.332, respectively, all p> 0.05). Correlation analysis demonstrated that LY and PA levels were negatively correlated with hospital stay (r= -0.265, r= -0.325, both p< 0.050), but CRP level was not correlated with hospital stay (r= -0.039, p> 0.05). Conclusion: CRP is correlated with the clinical typing of children with 2019-nCoV infection, while LY and PA levels may be closely correlated with the clinical typing and course of treatment of children with 2019-nCoV infection. © 2022, Professional Medical Publications. All rights reserved.

6.
J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad ; 34(2): 360-363, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1848216

ABSTRACT

The workup of corona virus disease (COVID-19) involves analyzing samples for acute or past presence of SARS-CoV-2 (virus). A detection of 2019 novel Corona virus (2019-nCov) by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) indicates current infection and positive IgG antibody level implies a prior infection. Imaging techniques like high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) chest and Xray chest helps in diagnosing and monitoring the disease. Most cases of 2019-nCov are mild and range from asymptomatic carriers to critical illness leading to acute respiratory distress, septic shock and multiorgan failure. We report two cases of COVID-19 who manifested with high grade fever, myalgias, cough and shortness of breath on minimal exertion. All baseline laboratory findings were normal. Initial RT-PCR was negative for oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal swabs. CT Chest showing typical peripheral patchy and ground glass opacities bilaterally, other markers of infectivity followed by antibody titer confirms the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/diagnosis , Early Diagnosis , Humans , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
7.
Hong Kong Journal of Paediatrics ; 27(2):118-125, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1843202

ABSTRACT

Since the first report of COVID-19 in Wuhan, China, the disease has rapidly spread to many countries worldwide. The initial reports showed that the incidence rate in adults was higher, while children and adolescents had fewer cases of infection. However, the number of COVID-19 cases has gradually increased in children and adolescents. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the percentage of children and/or adolescents of the total patients diagnosed with COVID-19. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library were searched to find relevant studies. All statistical analyses were conducted using StataMP 14 software. A total of 12 studies met the inclusion criteria. The final results showed that the percentage of children and/or adolescents of all COVID-19 cases was 0.06 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.04-0.07], which meant an average of 6 cases in children per 10,000 COVID-19 cases. The percentage of children and/or adolescents with COVID-19 was 0.03 (95% CI, 0.01-0.05), 0.09 (95% CI, 0.08-0.09), 0.09 (95% CI, 0.03-0.16) and 0.04 (95% CI, 0.00-0.10) in Asia, South America, North America and Europe, respectively. The present study showed a low percentage of COVID-19 cases of children and/or adolescents, but not without infection risk. Therefore, we should pay attention to the cases of children and/or adolescents during the COVID-19 period and raise our vigilance. © 2022, Medcom Limited. All rights reserved.

8.
Commun Dis Intell (2018) ; 462022 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841839
9.
Ain - Shams Journal of Anesthesiology ; 14(1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1837966

ABSTRACT

BackgroundIn December of 2019, a new disease which is caused by SARS-CoV-2, as an epidemic disease out of Wuhan, China, began to circulate. On March 11, 2020, the Republic of Turkey Ministry of Health had announced the first case from Turkey. The aim of this study is to analyze the scientific publications in the field of COVID-19 included in Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) from Turkey and to establish a theoretical background for future studies in the health literature with obtained valuable information about the publications. We searched all papers published in the field of COVID-19 by using the terms of “COVID-19,” “2019-n-CoV,” “SARS-CoV-2,” “Coronavirus disease 19,” and “2019 novel coronavirus” as scientific nomenclatures of COVID-19 in the topic search section of the software.ResultsOverall, 47,368 papers, indexed by SCI-E, were found related to COVID-19 between January 1, 2020, and December 13, 2020. Of these, 931 were from Turkey. In terms of specialities, the most contribution was from the Medicine General Internal followed by Dermatology. Most of the publications were article. English was the most preferred language in papers. Dermatological Theraphy published the most paper.ConclusionsApplying this kind of analysis on an intermittent basis gives a general perspective for contribution of a countries to scientific publications and useful for the further studies.

10.
International Journal of Biomathematics ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1832571

ABSTRACT

Considering the prevailing situations, the mathematical modeling and dynamics of novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) particularly in India are studied in this paper. The goal of this work is to create an effective SEIRS model to study about the epidemic. Four different SEIRS models are considered and solved in this paper using an efficient homotopy perturbation method. A clear picture of disease spreading can be obtained from the solutions derived using this method. We parametrized the model by considering the number of infection cases from 1 April 2020 to 30 June 2020. Finally, numerical analysis and graphical representations are provided to interpret the spread of virus. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of International Journal of Biomathematics is the property of World Scientific Publishing Company and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

11.
Clinics ; : 100042, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1803779

ABSTRACT

Background The Coronavirus 19 (COVID-19) pandemic has dramatically impacted liver organ transplantation. The American Society of Transplantation recommends a minimum of 28 days after symptom resolution for organ donation. However, the exact time for transplantation for recipients is unknown. Considering that mortality on the waiting list for patients with MELD >25 or fulminant hepatitis is higher than that of COVID-19, the best time for surgery after SARS-CoV-2 infection remains undetermined. This study aims to expand the current knowledge regarding the Liver Transplantation (LT) time for patients after COVID-19 and to provide transplant physicians with essential decision-making tools to manage these critically ill patients during the pandemic. Methods Systematic review of patients who underwent liver transplantation after diagnosis of COVID-19. The MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane, Lilacs, Embase, and Scielo databases were searched until June 20, 2021. The MESH terms used were "COVID-19" and "Liver transplantation". Results 558 articles were found;of these 13 articles and a total of 18 cases of COVID-19 prior to liver transplantation were reported. The mean age was 38.7±14.6, with male prevalence. Most had mild symptoms of COVID. Five patients have specific treatment for COVID-19 with convalescent plasm or remdesivir/oseltamivir, just one patient received hydroxychloroquine, and 12 patients received only symptomatic treatment. The median time between COVID-19 to LT was 19 days (13.5‒44.5). Deceased donor liver transplantation accounted for 61% of cases, while living donor transplantation was 39%. Conclusion Despite the concerns regarding the postoperative evolution, the mortality of patients with high MELD or fulminant hepatitis transplanted shortly after COVID-19 diagnosis does not seem to be higher. (PROSPERO, registration number = CRD42021261790)

12.
Infect Disord Drug Targets ; 2021 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793185

ABSTRACT

2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV), also known as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) or COVID-19 virus, is a member of the family Coronaviridae, which is responsible for the current pandemic of disease COVID-19. It is the seventh member of the family Coronaviridae, which infects humans, after 229E, OC43, NL63, HKU1, SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Fever, dry cough and severe pneumonia are seen as common symptoms at the early stages of COVID-19. Some cases progress to acute respiratory stress syndrome, septic shock, organ failure, and death. The development of an effective treatment or vaccination for treating or preventing this lethal condition is an urgent need in order to fight this crisis. Up to now, some effective vaccines with different efficacy profiles have been introduced. Herein, we have theoretically designed a scavenger system for gathering 2019-nCoVs, breaking them, and re-introducing them to the immune system.

13.
AIMS Public Health ; 7(2): 258-273, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792331

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In December 2019, the infection caused by 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) led to an outbreak in Wuhan, situated in the Hubei Province of China. Following this, there has been a rapid increase in the number of cases. On 12th March 2020, there were over 100,000 confirmed cases and almost 4,300 deaths worldwide. The clinical profile of children with COVID-19 is unknown due to the few number of cases reported. Currently, available data suggest they may have a milder form of illness. METHODS: A review of the literature published from June 2019 to March 2020 was undertaken to evaluate the clinical presentation, management and outcomes of COVID-19 in in children. Data sources included EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane library, ISI Web of Knowledge and references within identified articles. RESULTS: We identified 303 potential studies, and 295 were excluded for reasons including duplicates, experimental studies and case reports. Eight studies were eligible for inclusion, including a total of 820 paediatric cases of COVID-19. Asymptomatic cases represented 14.3% (n = 117) of the total number of cases identified, and thus the remaining 85.7% (n = 703) experienced symptoms. Fever was the commonest symptom in 53.9% (n = 48) of cases, followed by cough in 39.3% (n = 35) of cases, and rhinorrhoea or pharyngeal congestion in 13.5% (n = 12) of cases. Diarrhoea and sore throats were less common symptoms, 7.9% (n = 7) and 9.0% (n = 8) respectively. Other symptoms, including fatigue, headache and dizziness were rare. CONCLUSION: Children are disproportionately affected by COVID-19 and are more likely to run a milder cause of illness following this infection compared to adults. This outbreak only started 3 months ago, therefore, further population wide studies are needed to validate these findings.

14.
Commun Dis Intell (2018) ; 462022 04 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789947
15.
Front Pharmacol ; 12: 682794, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789396

ABSTRACT

Background: Viruses cause various human diseases, some of which become pandemic outbreaks. This study synthesized evidence on antiviral medicinal plants in Africa which could potentially be further studied for viral infections including Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) treatment. Methods: PUBMED, CINAHIL, Scopus, Google Scholar, and Google databases were searched through keywords; antiviral, plant, herb, and Africa were combined using "AND" and "OR". In-vitro studies, in-vivo studies, or clinical trials on botanical medicine used for the treatment of viruses in Africa were included. Results: Thirty-six studies were included in the evidence synthesis. Three hundred and twenty-eight plants were screened for antiviral activities of which 127 showed noteworthy activities against 25 viral species. These, were Poliovirus (42 plants), HSV (34 plants), Coxsackievirus (16 plants), Rhinovirus (14plants), Influenza (12 plants), Astrovirus (11 plants), SARS-CoV-2 (10 plants), HIV (10 plants), Echovirus (8 plants), Parvovirus (6 plants), Semiliki forest virus (5 plants), Measles virus (5 plants), Hepatitis virus (3 plants), Canine distemper virus (3 plants), Zika virus (2 plants), Vesicular stomatitis virus T2 (2 plants). Feline herpesvirus (FHV-1), Enterovirus, Dengue virus, Ebola virus, Chikungunya virus, Yellow fever virus, Respiratory syncytial virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Human cytomegalovirus each showed sensitivities to one plant. Conclusion: The current study provided a list of African medicinal plants which demonstrated antiviral activities and could potentially be candidates for COVID-19 treatment. However, all studies were preliminary and in vitro screening. Further in vivo studies are required for plant-based management of viral diseases.

16.
Acta Medica Iranica ; 59(1):4-14, 2021.
Article in French | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1761369

ABSTRACT

In the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, underlying diseases such as cardiovascular disease, respiratory illness, liver and kidney disease or malignancies, have a critical prognostic role for these patients. Due to the increased risk of mortality in patients with established or new-onset comorbidities, we decided to conduct a study to further investigate the possible comorbidities and treatment recommendations of COVID-19. All articles published by March 25, 2020, on the new coronavirus infection were reviewed and for cutaneous manifestation as a new emerging concern, by April 25, 2020. ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, Scopus, PubMed databases were searched, and keywords such as "COVID-19", "2019-nCoV", "Coronavirus2019", "SARS-CoV-2”, and "comorbidity" have been used. The most important comorbidity in elderly patients with confirmedCOVID-19 was cardiovascular disease, followed by diabetes and chronic respiratory disease, respectively, and on the other hand, COVID-19 itself could cause acute heart, lung, liver, kidney, and skin disease. Also, the prevalence of underlying diseases in dead patients or patients with severe COVID-19 is higher than the others. Considering treatment, drug interactions, and careful drug adjustment based on hepatic and renal metabolism are essential. The results of this study showed that the mortality rate and ICU admission in people with the underlying disease is higher than in other people. Also, we must pay attention to the possible multi-organ damages and comorbidities for the protection and successful treatment of COVID-19. There are some comorbidities like primary cutaneous manifestations that may have diagnostic or prognostic values in the COVID-19 course.

17.
Farmacia Hospitalaria ; : 15, 2022.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1761113

ABSTRACT

Objective: To determine the baseline characteristics associated with higher mortality at 42 days in patients hospitalized for COVID-19 in Spain. Method: The study analyzed a prospective cohort of hospitalized COVID-19 patients. The dependent variable was 42-day mortality. Data on the subjects' demographic and clinical characteristics, comorbidities, usual therapy and supportive interventions and treatments was collected within 48 hours from admission. To determine the potential association of the data with mortality, a multivariate analysis was performed using logistic regression. Results: 15,628 patients were included, 18.2% of whom (n = 2,806) died during the study period. According to the multivariate analysis, the variables that were significantly associated (p < 0.05) with mortality upon admission were: being referred from a nursing home (OR 1.9);having a high respiratory rate (OR 1,5);having moderate (OR 1.7) or severe (OR 2.9) pneumonia (CURB-65);aspartate aminotransferase transami- nase >= 100 IU/l (OR 2.1);lactate dehydrogenase >= 360 IU/L (OR 1.6);procalcitonin > 0.5 ng/mL (OR 1.8);creatine kinase >= 294 U/L (OR 1.5);D-dimer > 3,000 ng/mL (OR 1.5);hemoglobin < 11.6 g/dL (OR 1.4) and C-reactive protein > 120 mg/L (OR 1.2;requiring respiratory support within the first 48 hours (oxygen therapy [OR 2.0], non-invasive ventilation [OR 2.8], and mechanical ventilation [OR 3.5]);and being treated with interferon-beta (OR 1.5). On the contrary, being under 80 years of age was associated with lower mortality. Conclusions: The analysis, based on the data in the RERFAR registry, showed that the factors associated with poorer prognosis were older age, assessed using the CURB-65 scale, level of respiratory support required, severe pneu-monia (CURB-65), hypertransaminasemia, elevated creatine kinase, lactate and D-dimer levels, anemia, and elevated rate.

18.
Commun Dis Intell (2018) ; 462022 03 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1761676
19.
Pathogens ; 11(3)2022 Mar 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753660

ABSTRACT

Development and deployment of biosensors for the rapid detection of the 2019 novel severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are of utmost importance and urgency during this recent outbreak of coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19) caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection, which spread rapidly around the world. Cases now confirmed in February 2022 indicate that more than 170 countries worldwide are affected. Recent evidence indicates over 430 million confirmed cases with over 5.92 million deaths scattered across the globe, with the United States having more than 78 million confirmed cases and over 920,000 deaths. The US now has many more cases than in China where coronavirus cases were first reported in late December 2019. During the initial outbreak in China, many leaders did not anticipate it could reach the whole world, spreading to many countries and posing severe threats to global health. The objective of this review is to summarize the origin of COVID-19, its biological nature, comparison with other coronaviruses, symptoms, prevention, treatment, potential, available methods for SARS-CoV-2 detection, and post-COVID-19 symptoms.

20.
Non-conventional in English | National Technical Information Service, Grey literature | ID: grc-753676

ABSTRACT

For healthcare providers, specifically military and federal public health personnel, prompt and accurate diagnosis and isolation of SARS-CoV-2 novel coronavirus patients provide a two-fold benefit: (1) directing appropriate treatment to the infected patient as early as possible in the progression of the disease to increase survival rates and minimize the devastating sequelae following recovery and remission of symptoms;(2) provide critical information requirements that enable commanders and public health officials to best synchronize policy, regulations, and troop movement restrictions while best allocating scarce resources in the delicate balance of risk mitigation versus mission readiness. Simple personal protective measures and robust testing and quarantine procedures, instituted and enforced aggressively by senior leaders, physicians, and healthcare professionals at all levels are an essential aspect of the battle against the COVID-19 pandemic that will determine the success or failure of the overall effort. As consideration, the authors respectfully submit this vignette of the first confirmed positive COVID-19 case presenting to the Emergency Department at Winn Army Community Hospital, Fort Stewart, Georgia.

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