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1.
Journal of Intercultural Studies ; JOUR: 1-19,
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2087503

ABSTRACT

This article is an autoethnographic account of a participatory action research project conducted in Australia during COVID-19 lockdown. The research explores the potential for asynchronous multitracking performance to facilitate social connection and intercultural understanding, drawing on the knowledge of six arts practitioners. The account is written by an Indonesian-Australian researcher and dance practitioner engaged in rags sharqi (Arabic term for belly dance). Through the process of collaborating on a performance of ashra baladi, an improvisational form of Egyptian music and dance, issues emerged requiring consideration including how to respectfully navigate intercultural music engagement, the barriers and opportunities for intercultural understanding presented by digital platforms, music and dance, and how to navigate cultural identity in a super-diverse world. Taking a phenomenological perspective, autoethnography provides an appropriate method to critically reflect on these personal and cultural questions. The author offers insights from her lived experience, her exploration of various philosophies about cultural exchange, and her involvement in a community of practice engaged in intercultural musicking.

2.
Journal of Work-Applied Management ; 14(2):257-271, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2078124

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This research seized the COVID-19 pandemic-induced economic recession as a strategic response background to answer whether serious games (SGs) can be effectively applied to facilitate the strategic decision-making process. Design/methodology/approach: This paper develops a conceptual model and hypotheses based on the strategic formulation and SGs literature. Virtual-gamified workshops treat four companies in a quasi-experimental framework applying an action research design approach. The data were analysed triangularly from the observations, the focus group interviews and the surveys. Findings: A SG facilitates conveying conceptual recession management knowledge and structures the decision-making process. It incentivises creativity and motivation. Meanwhile, it is a tool to mitigate human errors due to cognitive biases. More importantly, it offers a new means to improve strategic decision-making adapted to different cases. The variety of game elements expands possibilities for different needs. Originality/value: This paper creatively bridges the gap between strategic decision facilitation and serious gaming in a crisis. It contributes a conceptual model and provides practical insights into SGs mechanics for companies. © 2021, Avo Schönbohm and Tingyue Viktoria Zhang.

3.
Sociological Research Online ; 27(3):587-603, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2064624

ABSTRACT

This contribution draws on the voices and reflections from young people as co-researchers in the Growing-Up Under Covid-19 project – a longitudinal ethnographic action research project to document, share, and respond to impacts of the pandemic on different spheres of young people’s lives. The research was conducted entirely online over 18 months in seven countries and has involved youth-led approaches to research, including video diaries and the use of artefacts and visual material to convey their experiences and support reflection and dialogue across research groups and with external stakeholders. In this contribution, the young co-researchers reflect on their rationale for using different visual media and why this was important for them. They also reflect on the significance of the representations in the visual images and how these images communicate how young people’s understanding of COVID and its impact on young people has changed (or given new meaning to) and how this in turn has given rise to particular responses and opportunities for young people. The article draws on examples of different visual forms selected by young people in Singapore, Italy, Lebanon, and the UK nations, including video, drawing, photography, and crafts. These different media and links to videos were included in the accompanying document. The contribution explores the different narratives and meanings behind the visuals, using the words of young people themselves, interspersed with narration from the adult researchers.

4.
Gac Sanit ; 37: 102255, 2022 Sep 29.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2061184

ABSTRACT

The objective of this article is to describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the implementation of the RoMoMatter project, using a community-based participatory action research methodology, in Córdoba (Spain). Five academic researchers and 30 community members participated. Individual interviews, focus groups and field notes were used as data collection techniques. The interviews were audio-recorded with the consent of the participants and transcribed verbatim. The information collected was coded using Atlas Ti software. The efforts of adaptation to the new pandemic scenario made by the participants and the technical and emotional support role played by the adaptation team are highlighted. It is concluded that the main impact of the pandemic was evidenced in the participatory process of all the people involved, and in the format and number of activities.

5.
Waikato Journal of Education ; 27(2):65-71, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2056559

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has significantly affected the field of teaching and educational research, requiring new changes to methodological tools in my research. My doctoral study examines Maldivian primary teachers’ engagement with social studies pedagogies through reflection. The pandemic posed several complex data collection challenges which I experienced as a researcher. As a result of not being able to return to the Maldives from New Zealand to gather data, data methods were altered from Participatory action research (PAR) to form online action research (OAR). The data were gathered from four different teachers in Maldivian primary schools through an online questionnaire, online workshops, online reflective narrative texts and online interviews. Unexpected research challenges included (i) time zone differences, (ii) my own and participants’ unfamiliarity with new methods of online data collection in the research, and (iii) challenges of maintaining good researcher rapport with participants. These research challenges contribute to an emerging understanding of the unexpected issues that researchers might face using an OAR approach. © 2022, Wilf Malcolm Institute of Educational Research. All rights reserved.

6.
Annales Medico-Psychologiques ; 180(5):442-446, 2022.
Article in French | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2048884

ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim of this article is to present the preliminary results of a multidisciplinary research project, which focuses on the potential effects of lock-down on intra-family and domestic violence. More specifically, it is a question of considering the effects of confinement on the precipitation of the violent marital bond, in order to consider the difficulties and levers identified by the perpetrators as well as the victims to get out of the violent circularity. Method: Questionnaires were widely distributed on social networks. Some are intended for perpetrators, others for victims. All question the evolution of the marital bond in the test of lock-down and the way in which the subject positions himself in the couple relationship. Interview grids have also been developed. Perpetrators and victims of domestic violence were therefore able to be met in the context of semi-structured interviews aimed at evaluating the impact of confinement on the dynamics of the violent bond between the two partners. Results: The first trends indicate a magnifying effect on the effects of influence in the couple, increasing the expression of violence, whether pre-existing to the lock-down, or revealed by them. The hold in the relationship and the attempt to master the other are, it would seem, to be read from the angle of a counterbalancing of the experience of passivity linked to the fact of feeling "locked in", subject to constraints. imposed spaces. The resources to get out of this violent circle and the process of constraint, do not seem to be able to be mobilized, as if lock-down removed any possibility of seizing the levers likely to stop the violent process. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

7.
Educational Linguistics ; 57:181-194, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2048099

ABSTRACT

The first years of the worldwide Covid-19 pandemic have brought unanticipated and far-reaching change to the ways language teachers have had to conceptualise and implement their practices. Many teachers have been compelled to move rapidly from classroom to online teaching which has had a substantial impact not only on their sense of identity, but also their sense of confidence in their usual practices. In this chapter, I draw on the reflections of Australian teachers working with international students in the English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas Students (ELICOS) sector, several of whom I have worked with in these early pandemic years as a facilitator of action research, as part of their professional development. Together with their colleagues, they needed to rapidly adjust their professional expectations, roles and practices. The chapter draws on short narrative comments from these teachers and illustrates how they and their colleagues drew on new concepts and mindsets to negotiate their teacher identities and to discover how they could best work with their students in the change to online environments. The data show that social, cognitive and emotional factors were major influences on these negotiations of identity. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

8.
Human Organization ; 81(3):229-239, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2046146

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic posed challenges to a community-based participatory research (CBPR) project for rural-dwelling adults with cancer in eastern North Carolina. This project trained Latino community leaders as palliative care lay advisors (PCLAs) to deliver information on cancer symptom management and advance care planning (ACP). Pandemic impacts were assessed using data from team meetings and fieldnotes, journal memos, online booster sessions, participant encounter forms and digital correspondence. Three key results were: 1) the disproportionate effects of COVID -19 on PCLAs and their communities;2) the need for a major study redesign that extended the recruitment region and changed the mode of intervention delivery;and 3) the adoption of new channels of communication. Online discussions and in-person meetings with PCLAs sustained engagement, resulting in a two-year, 73 percent retention rate, and addressed community concerns about COVID-19. Applied outcomes included the selection by the regional cancer center of a 2022 goal to improve cultural care for Latinos and the empowerment of PCLAs as community advocates. The challenges created by COVID-19 were met by the study team's ongoing commitment to CBPR principles, flexible adaptations to a changing environment, and strong relationships forged with community members and advocacy groups.

9.
Human Organization ; 81(3):240-247, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2045036

ABSTRACT

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, many qualitative and community-engaged researchers had to quickly shift from collecting data in person to utilizing virtual spaces. The foundation of community-based participatory research (CBPR) is authentic engagement and the establishment of trust between community and academic partners. We conducted a photovoice project that typically involves in-person sessions and revamped the process to be conducted virtually. The purpose of this article is to share how we navigated the process of conducting a virtual photovoice project with Black and white parents that explored parenting during the concurrent structural racism reckoning and COVID-19 pandemic, as well as share lessons learned. Despite the rapid shift from an in-person to virtual process, we were able to have an engaging conversation with participants that aligned with the core tenants of CBPR. Additionally, we overcame challenges through: (1) allotting extra time for unforeseen issues;(2) incorporating multiple activities to build trust and connection for participant-participant and participant-facilitator relationships;and (3) maintaining flexibility to meet the needs of the group. Ultimately, we learned several lessons through this project that may be applicable to community-engaged researchers deciding between conducting qualitative projects through traditional means or exploring alternative virtual options.

10.
Systems Research and Behavioral Science ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2041243

ABSTRACT

The severe restrictions placed upon face-to-face meetings during the Covid pandemic in 2020/2021 created new challenges for the on-going research into food systems in the Portsmouth community. The researchers had planned to use soft action research which involves participants meeting face-to-face. The restrictions that were imposed during the pandemic forbade such meetings and created a new set of issues for the researchers to overcome. In this paper, we describe how these shortcomings were addressed and introduce a novel way of adapting soft action research through the use of Information and Communication Technologies. The lessons learnt from our experiences will help inform researchers and professionals using Soft methods of inquiry and open opportunities for others to explore further the benefits and disadvantages of online investigation.

11.
South African Journal of Childhood Education (SAJCE) ; 12(1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2040088

ABSTRACT

Background: Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) refers to the care and education of children from birth to age four. There is a scarcity of research on inclusion in this marginalised sector in many developing countries, including South Africa. Aim: This article reports on a virtual learning participatory workshop on understanding inclusion with six ECCE teachers and two ECD practitioner trainers. Setting: Due to the social distancing necessitated by the Corona Virus pandemic, all interactions were facilitated through the WhatsApp platform. Methods: The study employed a participatory action learning and action research (PALAR) design that focuses on collaborative and contextually relevant learning and research. Data were generated in two iterative cycles using a baseline questionnaire, photovoice, reflective journals and purposeful conversations. Results: Cycle one found that some of the participants’ understanding of inclusion needed to be challenged. Their understandings of inclusion centred on discourses of disability with a narrow view of inclusion. This action learning set (ALS) mainly regarded inclusion to be a product rather than a process and claimed that segregation had some advantages. Some of the members of the ALS also misconstrued inclusion for micro-exclusive practices of assimilation and integration. Cycle two was planned to address these misunderstandings. Cycle two revealed that becoming inclusive means revisiting dominant ideologies about inclusion and a critical awareness of micro-exclusive practices. Conclusion: This research serves to challenge dominant beliefs of what inclusion is. The knowledge presented here could be cascaded to other ECCE centres in the South African context. With a scarcity of research on inclusion in ECCE, this study may provide a point of departure for future research.

12.
Estudos Feministas ; 30(2), 2022.
Article in Spanish | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2039508

ABSTRACT

A partir de una investigación-acción-participativa que comenzó en 2019 en una zona segregada del partido de San Martin del Gran Buenos Aires, propongo analizar, por un lado, los efectos desiguales de la emergencia sanitaria del coronavirus —y las medidas tendientes a mitigarlas—, en mujeres migrantes desde una perspectiva interseccional. Por otro lado, pretendo examinar las estrategias de cuidados comunitarios que despliegan estas mujeres que son en su gran mayoría quienes, a partir de sus múltiples organizaciones y saberes, contienen la crisis en estos barrios populares y cubren, a partir de la creación y el fortalecimiento del trabajo en red, las diversas falencias de las medidas adoptadas desde distintos niveles del Estado. Se examinarán tanto los datos recopilados con anterioridad a la pandemia como también registros de observación y entrevistas realizadas de manera remota durante 2020Alternate : Com base numa pesquisa-ação-participativa que começou em 2019 em uma área segregada do distrito de San Martin da Grande Buenos Aires, proponho analisar, por um lado, os efeitos desiguais da emergência sanitária do coronavírus —e as medidas que visa mitigá-los—, em mulheres migrantes, a partir de uma perspectiva interseccional. Por outro lado, pretendo examinar as estratégias de cuidado comunitário implantadas por essas mulheres, cuja grande maioria, a partir de suas múltiplas organizações e saberes, contêm a crise nesses bairros populares e cobrem, pela criação e fortalecimento do trabalho em rede, as várias deficiências das medidas adotadas em diferentes níveis do Estado. Serão examinados tanto os dados coletados antes da pandemia quanto os registros de observação e entrevistas realizadas remotamente durante o ano de 2020.Alternate : Based on a participatory action research that began in 2019 in a segregated area of the San Martin district of Greater Buenos Aires, I propose to analyze, on the one hand, the unequal effects of the coronavirus health emergency —and the measures aimed at mitigating them —, in migrant women from an intersectional perspective. On the other hand, I intend to examine the community care strategies deployed by these women, who are mostly the ones who, from their multiple organizations and knowledge, contain the crisis in these popular neighborhoods and cover, creating and strengthening networking, the various shortcomings of the measures adopted from different levels of the State. Both data collected prior to the pandemic and registers of observation and interviews conducted remotely during 2020 will be examined.

13.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 26(5): 565-568, 2022 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2039149

ABSTRACT

There is a constant need to educate and upskill nurses who are new to oncology settings. This article describes the outcomes of an education quality improvement (QI) project at an Organisation of European Cancer Institutes.


Subject(s)
Hematology , Neoplasms , Humans , Medical Oncology , Quality Improvement
14.
Feminist Formations ; 33(2):vii-xiii, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2033904

ABSTRACT

What is there to say during these tumultuous times? Over the last year, in each introduction I've written for an issue of Feminist Formations, it seems there are new crises and violences to contend with. Living through a deadly global pandemic, we have sustained so many losses. At the time of this writing, COVID cases in India have overwhelmed the healthcare system, particularly in rural areas. There is a desperate shortage of hospital beds, antiviral drugs, vaccines, and even oxygen to treat the rising number of patients. In the US, anti-Asian violence has increased exponentially, evidenced by the recent shootings of six Asian American women in Atlanta. In many parts of the country, violence against Asians has specifically targeted Asian elders and women. Police violence against Black, Latinx, and Indigenous communities continues, and while many felt relief over the recent guilty verdict of Derek Chauvin in the murder of George Floyd, we also must contend with the fact that fewer than 5 percent of police who commit acts of violence against BIPOC communities are ever held responsible. And in Gaza, Palestinian people continue to experience state and settler-colonial violence from the Israeli government, with more than 145 Palestinians—including forty-one children—killed by Israeli bombing raids this month, and nearly a thousand Palestinians wounded. We are reminded that what is happening in Palestine is a feminist issue.

15.
World Journal on Educational Technology: Current Issues ; 14(4):1106-1119, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2025996

ABSTRACT

Bacground: This research held in 2019/2020 supervised the students’ external Practicums of a Special Professional Training Programme in Auxiliary Operations of Administrative and General Services when students could not carry out their Practicums in person in companies due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Purpose: the proposed Practicum is of most professional importance so a completion in a virtual and synchronous way through virtual and educational platforms like Genially™ and Google Suite™. In this virtual environment, students had to connect daily and perform the functions of an administrative assistant working in the different departments of the company. Methodology: This research followed the Research-Action approach. Major conclusions: During the Practicum, the researchers reviewed and adapted the environment based on the results we were obtaining. The major contribution is that it proved the effectiveness of active methodologies in the training of students in a special modality professional programme that, together with a Research-Action approach, facilitates the development of the students' work skills. © 2022 Birlesik Dunya Yenilik Arastirma ve Yayincilik Merkezi. All rights reserved.

16.
International Journal of Multidisciplinary: Applied Business & Education Research ; 3(8):1499-1507, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2025467

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has transformed education delivery and doubled the challenges of learners with special needs (LSENs) due to inaccessible assistive technologies and limited face-to-face interaction with special education teachers. Consequently, their parents were forced to teach without formal training (World bank, 2020). Thus, this sequential mixed method study aimed to improve the learners' selected Life Science competencies in animal reproduction, genetic engineering, animal survival, and evolution through Parent-Assisted Learning Plan (PALP). The PALP is a 3-week home instruction cycle introduced to the participants where the teacher who created the self-learning modules met one-on-one with the home learning facilitators (HLFs) to discuss the various concepts covered in the modules emphasizing real-world applications and demonstrating strategies in teaching the concepts to the participants at home. Six Grade 11 LSENs from Ferdinand E. Marcos Senior High School participated in this study. The data came from validated 50-item teacher-created tests and focus group discussions. Frequency, percentage, means, and t-test was used to analyse quantitative data, while thematic analysis was applied for qualitative data. The t-test results show that PALP effectively improves learners' selected Life Science competencies. However, the participants also faced problems, including the difficulty of lessons, poor information retention, and a lack of formal sign language training among home learning facilitators. It is then recommended that schools may adopt and implement the PALP to help LSENs cope with the new learning delivery. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of International Journal of Multidisciplinary: Applied Business & Education Research is the property of Future Science and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

17.
Critical and Radical Social Work ; 10(2):297-318, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2021437

ABSTRACT

Community accountability is a model through which to redress anti-Black racism in health care and to create community-based participatory research about the health of Black Canadians. This article provides a case example of a study undertaken by a Black community collective in Quebec made up of researchers, activists, service providers, business leaders and their allies who sought community accountability in making visible the impact of COVID-19 on local Black communities. The principles articulated within the Black emancipatory action research approach (Akom, 2011) are used to ground an analysis of our research-activist process in order to illuminate how knowledge gained through the collection of data can be used to help inform Black communities about the realities, needs and concerns of their members, to advocate for rights and entitlements, and to work towards community accountability in research that empowers Black communities, both in Quebec and elsewhere.

18.
Phi Delta Kappan ; 104(1):28-32, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2020733

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the long-standing problem of teacher attrition. Some teachers have reported that they have considered leaving the profession because of a lack of advancement opportunities. Jennifer Wu-Pope explains how research-practice partnerships can play a role in retaining these teachers while leveraging their expertise in educational improvement efforts. Participation in research-practice partnerships could be offered as a professional advancement track option for teachers. Providing that option as a hybrid position in which teachers remain in the classroom for part of their day while using the rest of their time for research can be one way to address dissatisfaction among high-performing teachers.

19.
4th International Conference on Cities Identity Through Architecture and Arts, CITAA 2020 ; : 251-264, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2013878

ABSTRACT

The paper reflects on how the identity and authenticity of art cities, with special regard to those that are considered as best practices in the field of heritage protection, can be undermined by processes of tourist gentrification stimulated by the global interest they exercise because of their recognized universal value. The neighborhood of San Lorenzo within the World Heritage Site of Florence (Italy) is presented as a case study of a historic community whose socio-economic fabric has deeply changed over the years due to increasing overtourism. The paper focuses on the action research “San Lorenzo Laboratory”, coordinated by the Department of Architecture of the University of Florence, which aims to define, on a participatory basis, a shared strategy for the socially sustainable regeneration of the neighborhood, leveraging the redesign of public space and the reuse of an abandoned historical complex—the former monastery of Sant'Orsola. The results of the Laboratory, which took the form of requests and design concepts derived from discussions between experts, citizens, and stakeholders, have been delivered to the public institutions concerned and are intended to pave the way for a development and management model for the entire historic center, alternative to the tourist monoculture. The paper concludes by highlighting how the first effects of the initiative can be seen today in some policies and measures implemented by the City Council in response to the social and economic crisis triggered by the Covid-19 pandemic. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

20.
Int J Qual Stud Educ ; 35(8): 805-823, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2017259

ABSTRACT

In this introduction to the special issue, Youth Participatory Action Research on Puerto Rican Students' Experiences with Hurricane Maria: Shifting from Resilience to Resistance, we outline the theoretical foundations of youth participatory action research (YPAR) and explicate the guiding principles that are seminal in the corpus of YPAR literature. We propose a synthesized model based on these guiding principles called the arc of transformation in YPAR. The model is used to examine points of convergence and divergence in how these principles are employed across YPAR methods and pedagogies. We close by discussing the rising emergence of arts-based YPAR methods and how they encourage young people to engage in artistic, creative, and innovative approaches to youth-driven inquiry alongside community members, educators, scholars and researchers.

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