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1.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 19(17):10797, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2023705

ABSTRACT

The practice of physical activity during adolescence is essential for the proper development of the population. In recent decades, the relevance of physical activity has been increasing, due to the development of the “fat but fit” paradigm. This paradigm shows that adolescents with a high level of physical fitness are healthier than adolescents with poorer physical fitness, regardless of their weight, giving importance to sports practice over other aspects. However, few previous studies have analyzed the differences in physical and body composition between active and sedentary adolescents in this paradigm. For this reason, the objectives of the present study were to establish the differences in body composition, physical performance, and adherence to the Mediterranean diet between active and sedentary adolescents;and to analyze the differences between active and sedentary adolescents according to the “fat but fit” paradigm. The sample consisted of 791 adolescent whose body composition, level of physical activity, adherence to the Mediterranean diet, and physical fitness were measured. It was found significant between active and sedentary adolescents in most of the anthropometric, AMD, and physical fitness variables, with a significant effect of the covariates gender, age, BMI, and biological maturation on the model. The binary logistic regression analysis performed shows that anthropometric variables, AMD, and VO2 max can be considered as primary outcomes to distinguish between active and sedentary groups of adolescents. Furthermore, the results showed that the active adolescents, regardless of their weight status, had lower fat mass and greater muscle mass, as well as a higher performance in the physical fitness tests, and greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet than the sedentary adolescents. To conclude, the practice of physical activity is a determinant for the improvement of body composition, physical performance, and adherence to the Mediterranean diet of the adolescent population, regardless of their gender, age, weight, or maturity status.

2.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 19(16):10256, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2023664

ABSTRACT

This research aims to summarize the process and results of the 2022 Report Card on Physical Activity for Brazilian children and adolescents. A group of experts led by 10 PhD researchers gathered the best possible evidence on physical activity indicators. The Report Card Brazil 2022 included the top 10 indicators of physical activity and sleep, obesity, and poor mental health variables, which made up four dimensions: (I) Daily Behaviors;(II) Settings and Sources of Influence;(III) Government Strategies and Investments;and (IV) Health Outcomes. Comprehensive searches, including peer-reviewed and gray literature searches, were performed for each indicator. Data were considered from systematic reviews, local and national surveys, websites, and official information from the Brazilian Federal Government. Grades from the indicators ranged from F (Active Play) to B (School). In addition, the results found for each indicator were Overall Physical Activity (D), Organized Sport Participation (C−), Active Transportation (C), Sedentary Behaviors (D), Sleep (C), Family and Peers (C−), Community and Environment (C), Government (D+), Physical Fitness (D+), Obesity (11.7%), and Poor Mental Health (37.8%). Successfully strategies for increasing physical activity among Brazilian children and adolescents should look at the different indicators presented in this report.

3.
Psychiatry Research ; 317:114814, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2004424

ABSTRACT

Mental health problems among children and adolescents are increasingly reported amidst the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. In this umbrella review, we aimed to synthesize global evidence on the epidemiologic burden and correlates of child and adolescent mental health (CAMH) problems during this pandemic from existing systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Adopting the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) methodology, we evaluated 422 citations and identified 17 eligible reviews with medium to high methodological quality. Most of the reviews reported a high prevalence of anxiety, depression, sleep disorders, suicidal behavior, stress-related disorders, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and other mental health problems. Also, factors associated with CAMH such as age, gender, place of residence, educational attainment, household income, sedentary lifestyle, social media and internet use, comorbidities, family relationships, parents' psychosocial conditions, COVID-19 related experiences, closure of schools, online learning, and social support were reported across reviews. As most studies were cross-sectional and used nonrepresentative samples, future research on representative samples adopting longitudinal and intervention designs is needed. Lastly, multipronged psychosocial care services, policies, and programs are needed to alleviate the burden of CAMH problems during and after this pandemic.

4.
Pediatrics ; 149, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003469

ABSTRACT

Background: To strengthen the pathways for diverse applicants to health professional school, we need to rethink traditional strategies for providing outreach as current measures haven't met the growing needs. The Tour for Diversity in Medicine (T4D) was established as a grassroots effort to mediate pipeline leakiness through a mission to educate, inspire, and cultivate future health professionals of diverse racial and ethnic background. Coronavirus, though, changed the landscape of engaging with students. In April 2020, T4D conducted new virtual sessions beginning with Instagram live interview sessions. This progressed to a virtual mentorship conference, #VirtualT4D, which engaged with >1300 viewers over four days, including high school, undergraduate, and medical students from diverse backgrounds across the globe. To strengthen the pediatrician pipeline, T4D adapted its model to provide pediatric careerspecific mentorship virtually through the Pediatric Mentoring Circles (PMC) to trainees considered underrepresented in medicine and students from backgrounds considered disadvantaged. Methods: Student recruitment was conducted through T4D social media channels (Twitter, Instagram). This targeted premedical students from high school through postbaccalaureate level. Faculty included six pediatrician mentors from T4D, representing various training levels from residency to junior faculty with different specialty backgrounds. Monthly sessions were conducted from September-December 2020. Grant funding was obtained through the American Association of Pediatrics “Pediatric Pipeline Innovation Program” mechanism. Results: Fifty-five students were selected and divided into groups with the six T4D faculty mentors. Students represented 16 states with >90% representing underrepresented racial/ ethnic backgrounds. Importantly, 42% of students never previously attended a pipeline program, 65% are first generation college students, 75% will be the first healthcare worker in their family, and 100% would be the first physician in their family. Five topic areas were addressed (applying to medical school, goal setting and network development, pediatrics career opportunities, pediatrics leadership, and the impact of racism on child and adolescent health) through workshops utilizing different learning modalities. Students were provided pre and post workshop learning articles and tools for further developing their professional identity formation, through goal setting, network mapping, and personal reflections. Conclusion: T4D PMC increased exposure to pediatrics through a unique virtual model with scaffolded sessions based on the students' education level and a supportive environment to foster professional identity formation through pediatric-focused mentorship. Additionally, PMC provided introductory knowledge and skills for students regarding the medical school/ residency application process. Students appreciated the virtual model as it gave them a national tiered network of peers and mentors. Mentors empowered students to continue their journeys to pediatrics by embracing shared experiences through stories about successes and hardships. Next steps include long-term evaluation of student outcomes and partnering with organizations such as Association of Pediatric Program Directors as the next planned cohort targets medical students from diverse backgrounds.

6.
Rev. Bras. Saúde Mater. Infant. (Online) ; 22(2): 415-422, Apr.-June 2022. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1987231

ABSTRACT

Abstract Objectives: to characterize school-aged children, adolescents, and young people's profile and their associations with positive COVID-19 test results. Methods: an observational and descriptive study of secondary data from the COVID-19 Panel in Espírito Santo State in February to August 2020. People suspected of COVID-19, in the 0-19-years old age group, were included in order to assess clinical data and demographic and epidemiological factors associated with the disease. Results: in the study period, 27,351 COVID-19 notification were registered in children, adolescents, and young people. The highest COVID-19 test confirmation was found in Caucasians and were 5-14 years age group. It was also observed that headache was the symptom with the highest test confirmation. Infection in people with disabilities was more frequent in the confirmed cases. The confirmation of cases occurred in approximately 80% of the notified registrations and 0.3% of the confirmed cases, died. Conclusion: children with confirmed diagnosis for COVID-19 have lower mortality rates, even though many were asymptomatic. To control the chain of transmission and reduce morbidity and mortality rates, it was necessaryto conduct more comprehensive research and promote extensive testing in the population.


Resumo Objetivos: Caracterizar o perfil de crianças, adolescentes e jovens em idade escolar e associações com o resultado positivo do teste COVID-19. Métodos: estudo observacional e descritivo de dados secundários do Painel COVID-19, no Estado do Espírito Santo no período de fevereiro a agosto de 2020. Foram incluídas pessoas suspeitas de COVID-19, em faixas etárias de 0 a 19 anos, a fim de avaliar os dados clínicos e fatores demográficos e epidemiológicos associados ao agravo. Resultados: no período de estudo, foram considerados 27.351 registros de notificação da COVID-19 em crianças, adolescentes e jovens. As maiores chances de confirmação dos casos foram encontradas na faixa etária de 5 a 14 anos, em pessoas de raça/cor branca para COVID-19. Observouse que cefaleia foi o sintoma que apresentou maior chance de confirmação de teste. Já a infecção em pessoas deficientes foram mais frequentes nos casos confirmados. A confirmação dos casos se deu em aproximadamente 80% dos registros de notificação e do total confirmados 0,3% vieram a óbito. Conclusão: as crianças com diagnóstico confirmado para COVID-19 apresentam menor taxa de mortalidade, mesmo que muitas fossem assintomáticas. Para o controle da cadeia de transmissão e redução nas taxas de morbimortalidade, torna-se necessária a realização de pesquisas mais abrangentes e promoção da testagem ampla na população.

7.
Public Library Quarterly ; : 1-12, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1972805

ABSTRACT

The goal of this research was to examine U.S.-based librarians’ history of training on public health topics and their comfort delivering adolescent-focused public health interventions. A total of 269 library staff from 37 states completed a brief online survey. Eighty-four percent of respondents stated that their library had hosted public health programs for youth ages 10–17. Eighty-five percent reported they would be interested or very interested in facilitating an intervention focused on youth (ages 10–17). Ninety-eight percent of participants reported receiving training on at least one public health topic. The most common trainings reported were related to infectious diseases, including COVID (82.9%) and adolescent health and development (78.4%). Most participants were comfortable discussing public health topics, such as sexual and reproductive health (83.6%), adolescent health and development (82.5%), substance use (81.4%), and infectious diseases (81%). Having learned about the topic on their own and having had experience related to the topic were the most common reasons stated for feeling comfortable discussing public health topics with youth. These findings suggest that librarians are interested in and comfortable enough to serve as resources for health promotion among adolescents when adequately trained. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Public Library Quarterly is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1969220

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study is to provide essential data for the establishment of education and policy for the formation of healthy lifestyles of adolescents in the future by analyzing the patterns of changes in society due to the prolonged COVID-19 in the physical activities, sleeping habits, obesity, and mental health of Korean adolescents. To this end, a total of 147,346 adolescents were selected and analyzed according to the purpose of the study in the 2018 (14th), 2019 (15th), and 2020 (16th) raw data of the "Youth Health Behavior Online Survey," an annual national approval statistical survey conducted by a Korean government agency. The study examined changes in the physical activity, obesity, sleep, and mental health of Korean adolescents due to COVID-19. The physical activity rate of Korean adolescents in 2019 decreased by 5.3% from 2018. In addition, the physical activity rate in 2020 decreased by 2.1% compared to 2019. It was found that physical activity steadily decreased (p < 0.001). The obesity rate increased by 0.9% in 2019 compared to 2018 and by 1.8% in 2020 compared to 2019. Although the obesity rate steadily increased, it was found that it was accelerated due to COVID-19 (p < 0.001). Looking at the subjective sleep satisfaction rate of Korean adolescents, in 2019, it was 0.1% lower than in 2018, while in 2020, when COVID-19 began, it increased by 3.5% compared to 2019. It was found that satisfaction with sleep increased after COVID-19. Finally, the mental health characteristics of Korean adolescents by year were divided into stress and depression. Stress decreased by 1% compared to 2019 and 2018 and by 6.2% compared to 2020 and 2019. Depression increased by 1% in 2019 compared to 2018 and decreased by 3.4% in 2020 compared to 2019. In other words, stress and depression decreased after COVID-19. In 2020, when COVID-19 occurred, it was confirmed that there was a change in the health behavior of adolescents compared to 2018 and 2019. Therefore, active responses from schools, families, and communities are required to foster healthy lifestyle habits in social changes such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Adolescent , Adolescent Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise , Humans , Obesity/epidemiology , Pandemics , Sleep
9.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 120(4): S62-S68, 2022 08.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1964369

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic has transformed the way we communicate. Telehealth has gained relevance and has become a priority issue on the innovation agenda of health systems. Clinical attention of the adolescent population has some unique characteristics that set it apart from others. The objective of this document is to generate a guide of good practices that is useful in the virtual consultation with the adolescent patient. This guide is presented as a support tool for health professionals, understanding that it must be reviewed and updated in successive versions.


La pandemia por coronavirus ha transformado el modo de comunicarnos. La telesalud ha ganado relevancia y ha pasado a ser un tema prioritario en la agenda de innovación de los sistemas sanitarios. La atención de la población adolescente presenta algunas características que la distinguen de las demás. El objetivo de este documento es generar una guía de buenas prácticas que sea de utilidad en la consulta virtual del paciente adolescente. Esta guía se presenta como una herramienta de soporte para los profesionales de la salud, entendiendo que deberá ser revisada y actualizada en sucesivas versiones.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics
10.
Health Promot Pract ; : 15248399221113224, 2022 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962699

ABSTRACT

As COVID-19 sweeps across the country, individuals within the carceral system face an increased risk of contracting the virus, and as a result, heightened risk for mental health symptoms. We discuss how COVID-19 appears to be exacerbating mental health inequities for children within the carceral system and the need to respond accordingly. Children within the carceral system represent a particularly vulnerable population, and the majority of detained or confined youth identify as Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC). As juvenile detention centers in multiple states report cases of COVID-19, children who are confined are experiencing higher rates of illness and fear of illness. It is crucial to consider how the mental health of children who are confined will be disproportionately affected compared with the general population. We provide recommendations to revise practices to improve and reduce mental health outcomes among confined children.

11.
BMJ Paediatrics Open ; 6(1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1962323

ABSTRACT

IntroductionClimate change is exacerbating a pre-existing child rights crisis. Lower- (low- and lower-middle-) income countries have borne 99% of the disease burden from the crisis, of which children under five carry 90%. In response, much of the recent global policy efforts focus on climate action. However, unsustainable levels of debt and tax abuses are draining countries of crucial revenue to handle the crisis. Like the climate crisis, these are primarily facilitated by entities domiciled within higher- (upper-middle- and high-) income countries. This paper aims to review these revenue leaks in countries where children are at the greatest risk of climate change to identify opportunities to increase climate change resilience.MethodsWe compiled data on tax abuse, debt service and climate risk for all lower-income countries with available data to highlight the need for intervention at the global level. We used the Climate Change Risk Index (CCRI), developed by UNICEF. Additionally, we used figures for tax abuse and debt service as a percentage of government revenue.ResultsWe present data on 62 lower-income countries with data on revenue losses, of which 55 have CCRI data. Forty-two of these 62 countries (67.7%) are at high risk of lost government revenues. Forty-one (74.5%) of the 55 countries with CCRI data are at high risk of climate change. Thirty-one countries with data on both (56.4%) are at high risk of both climate change and revenue losses. Most countries at high risk of both are located in sub-Saharan Africa. This shows that countries most in need of resources lose money to arguably preventable leaks in government revenue.DiscussionHigher-income countries and global actors can adopt policies and practices to ensure that they do not contribute to human rights abuses in other countries. Highlighting the impact of a failing global economic model on children’s economic and social rights and one which increases their vulnerability to the climate emergency could help drive the transition towards a model that prioritises human rights and the environment on which we all depend.

12.
Journal of Physical Activity & Health ; 18(6):677-685, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1958262

ABSTRACT

Background: To suppress the transmission of coronavirus, many governments, including that of the island of Ireland, implemented a societal lockdown, which included school closures, limits on social gatherings, and time outdoors. This study aimed to evaluate changes in physical activity (PA), mental health, sleep, and social media use among adolescent girls during lockdown. Methods: 281 female pupils (12-14 y) taking part in the ongoing Walking In Schools study on the island of Ireland self-reported PA, mental health, sleep, and social media use before (September-October 2019) and during lockdown (May-June 2020), via questionnaires. These were supplemented with open-ended structured interviews conducted with 16 girls during lockdown. Results: During the period of lockdown and school closures, pupils tried new forms of PA and undertook PA with family, but there was no significant change in self-reported PA. There was a decline in health-related quality of life and motivation for exercise;however, self-efficacy for walking and happiness with appearance increased. There was no change in sleep quality or social media usage. Conclusions: Despite the many challenges that schools face as they reopen, there is a need to continue to prioritize PA and motivation for exercise to support health and well-being in adolescent girls. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

14.
Arch Dis Child ; 2022 Jul 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1950050

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Most eating disorders (EDs) develop during adolescence, impacting a critical period of development. There is limited research on EDs in children in Singapore or the rest of South-East (SE) Asia. DESIGN: We analysed a hospital-based cohort of paediatric patients (≤18 years) with EDs (n=177) in Singapore between 2011 and 2021. Historical trends, over three decades, were obtained by comparison with two previously published Singapore studies. RESULTS: Of the 177 patients, the majority 158 (89%) were females, with anorexia nervosa (AN) 151 (85%). The mean age at diagnosis was 14.6 (SD 1.8) years. For AN, the mean duration of illness before diagnosis was 8.3 (SD 6.3) months and this has decreased by 8.4 months (95% CI 4.5 to 12.3 months, p=<0.0001) from the 2003 to 2010 cohort, and 17.7 months (95% CI 12.6 to 22.8 months, p=<0.0001) from the 1994 to 2002 cohort. Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) cases are increasing, and the clinical profile differs from other EDs. Since family-based therapy (FBT) was introduced for patients with AN, the remission rate at 1 year improved from 30% to 79%, and time to remission has decreased from 16 to 7.5 months. CONCLUSIONS: AN is the most common ED in paediatric patients in Singapore. Over the past three decades, EDs are being diagnosed earlier. FBT has emerged as the most effective treatment for AN. ARFID is being diagnosed more frequently. Data suggest that EDs are prevalent and increasing among adolescents in SE Asia. Singapore is a good test case for SE Asia, but research and attention to the problem in the region is needed.

15.
Journal of Adolescent Health ; 70(4):S50-S51, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1936678

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Offering contraceptives at pharmacies without a prescription is one solution to reduce the incidence of unintended pregnancies among adolescents and young adults (AYA) in the US by increasing convince, simplicity, and affordability of contraceptives. The purpose of this study was to develop a Telemedicine e-platform that simulates pharmacist prescribing contraceptives to AYA, and receive feedback from the target population via usability testing of the e-platform prototype. Methods: An existing telemedicine e-platform COVID symptom check-in tool used by a large pediatric hospital system was modified into a prototype to simulate pharmacist prescribing contraceptives to AYA. Usability testing participants enrolled in April 2021 were assigned female sex at birth, 15-21 years old, seeking contraceptive initiation services at a subspecialty academic adolescent medicine clinic, had a prior history or intention to have penile-vaginal intercourse in the next 12 months, owned a mobile device, and could read and speak English. During a one-hour study visit participants first completed brief surveys on their sociodemographic and sexual history. Next, in a video-recorded “think aloud” interview participants verbalized initial thoughts, technical issues, and feedback while they engaged with the e-platform prototype on their own mobile device. Following the interview, participants completed an online survey answering questions on a 5-point Likert scale to evaluate the usefulness, ease of use, effectiveness, reliability, and satisfaction with the prototype. Descriptive analysis was utilized for the analysis of quantitative survey data and thematic analysis was employed for the interview transcripts. Results: Usability testing was conducted with N=10 patients, with a mean age of 16.9 (SD 1.97) years old. Seven participants (70%) reported using birth control to prevent pregnancy and 4 (40%) reported taking a pregnancy test in the past. Overall participants agreed or strongly agreed that using an app to receive contraceptives would make it easier for teens to access (100%) and make contraceptive use less stigmatizing (100%). Also, participants agreed that receiving birth control prescriptions from a pharmacist without a doctor’s visit would be safe (80%), convenient (80%), acceptable (80%), and easy (80%). Additionally, three main issues with the prototype were identified during interviews. First, participants described difficulty comprehending medical history questions from CDC medical eligibility criteria, suggesting the need to better account for adolescent health literacy in re-design. Next, participants identified glitches with the prototype e-platform to address before moving to production. Lastly, participants shared e-platform design suggestions to improve engagement including, adding images and visually drawing attention to links to important resources or functions (i.e. link to bedside.org, button to call pharmacist directly). Conclusions: AYA found contraceptive prescription by pharmacist via an e-platform to be highly acceptable and provided critical feedback to improve usability prior to final design and pilot testing, including edits for health literacy, and to improve function and aesthetics of the e-platform. Sources of Support: CHOP Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness;National Institutes of Health, K23 (NIH K23MH119976-01A, Wood).

16.
Journal of Adolescent Health ; 70(4):S43-S44, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1936668

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Due to social isolation required during the COVID-19 pandemic, many practices made a sudden transition to telehealth with minimal preparation or telehealth training. Telehealth has been extensively studied in the adult population and shown to improve patient satisfaction in multiple settings with satisfactory clinical outcomes. However, the use of telehealth has been rarely studied in the adolescent and young adult population, where providers face unique challenges regarding consent and confidentiality. The Society of Adolescent Health and Medicine considers the confidential interview an essential component of health care for adolescents as it is consistent with their development of maturity and autonomy. Without it, some adolescents will forgo care leading to poor health outcomes. Though the field of Adolescent Medicine recognizes the importance of speaking with patients alone, it is difficult to establish confidentiality when conferencing with a patient over a telephone or video call. The purpose of this study is to compare patient satisfaction and visit confidentiality between telehealth and in person visits in adolescents and young adults. Methods: Patients were recruited from a subspecialty adolescent medicine clinic associated with a large children’s hospital, as well as from a system of free reproductive and primary care clinics with both school based and community sites. Data was gathered via anonymous survey, with questions modeled from the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative Young Adult Health Care Survey and the University of Rochester Telemedicine and Non-Telemedicine Visit Experience Interview. Online surveys were sent via email to patients seen both in person and via telehealth at all sites. Results: Survey results were obtained from both the telehealth (n=46, 28% of respondents) and in person (n=116, 71.6% of respondents) populations. Age of respondents varied between age 13-25. Respondents were majority female (95% telehealth vs 93% in person). 91.5% of telehealth respondents reported previous experience with teleconferencing technology for school or work compared to 83.5% of in person respondents. Of telehealth responses, 70.2% participated in a video visit, while 29.8% participated in a visit via telephone. 97.8% of telehealth respondents reported that they were able to meet with their provider one on one, compared to 97.4% of in person visits (p>0.05). When asked to rank their provider on a scale of 10, ratings were not significantly different, with a higher proportion of telehealth respondents ranking their provider as a 9 or 10 out of 10. 83% telehealth respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they would recommend telemedicine to a friend, and 100% of these respondents agreed or strongly agreed that it was easy to communicate with their provider during their visit. Conclusions: Adolescent and young adult patients perceive that confidentiality in telehealth visits is not significantly inferior to that of in-office visits and they generally have a positive evaluation of their telehealth experience. Future work should be done to evaluate best practices for how confidentiality is established and maintained in telehealth visits and to evaluate parental perception of telehealth visits in those adolescent patients who are under age 18. Sources of Support: None.

17.
Journal of Adolescent Health ; 70(4):S79-S80, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1936633

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Despite decades of safety and effectiveness data, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates remain low, and one-third of adolescents fail to initiate the series by age 13, the age at which it should be completed. While there is extensive research on factors related to uptake, there is less known about the times that eligible adolescents do not get vaccinated (missed opportunities [MOs]). This study sought to quantify the extent of MOs among adolescents ages 11 to 13 during both preventive and acute care visits. Methods: Medical claims data from years 2010 to 2017 from a large midwestern insurance provider were used to calculate total numbers of MOs between ages 11 and 13. Adolescents included had continuous health insurance enrollment born between 2001 and 2004 in Iowa for the three-year period between ages 11 and 13 (n=14,505). The creation of the MO definition was informed by input from primary care and pediatric providers to ensure that all visits that could be potential vaccination opportunities were included. MOs were divided into several categories: total, among non-initiators, occurring prior to initiation, occurring after the first dose, and occurring between the first and last dose. Two subgroup comparisons for all categories (urban vs. rural;male vs. female) were explored using t-tests. Results: Overall, less than one-third of adolescents in the sample initiated the series by age 13. Females experienced significantly fewer MOs;5.98 (SD=5.49) for females compared to 6.18 (SD=6.04) for males. For initiators, the majority of MOs occurred prior to initiation of the series, which on average, occurred at age 12;again females experienced significantly fewer MOs compared to males;means for males and females were 3.62 and 4.07, respectively. In sub-group comparisons, rural adolescents tended to have fewer MOs than their urban counterparts and females tended to have fewer MOs than males. For example, urban females had significantly more MOs overall (M=6.08) compared to rural females (M=5.85). Conclusions: Results from this study highlight not only the extent of MOs, but also the utility of medical claims data in understanding patterns of adolescent health care utilization. Claims data provides a comprehensive view and level of granularity not available in other immunization data source. Future research could focus on better understanding the issue of MOs in other geographic areas or among populations with public insurance. Overall, in this sample of privately insured adolescents, it is clear that a lack of opportunity was not a barrier to HPV vaccination, as there were many opportunities in this critical age range, particularly among males and urban adolescents. Additionally, low rates of HPV vaccination have been compounded by the COVID-19 pandemic with many adolescents missing preventive care visits during the pandemic. Moving forward, it will be critical for providers to take advantage of any opportunities to vaccinate, both acute and preventive care visits, to ensure adolescents receive the vaccines they need and reduce these MOs going forward. Sources of Support: Cooperative Agreement 3 U48 DP005021-01S4 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute.

18.
Index de Enfermeria ; 31(2), 2022.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1935144

ABSTRACT

Primary Objective: Determine the principal actions of Teletriage /teleorientation of pediatric nursing during the Covid-19 pandemic. Method: Exploratory, longitudinal, documentary study, with 349 registration cards, in a specialized institute from Lima, Peru, during the months of May to July in the year 2020. Principal results: 28.4% of the patients attended were breastfeeding;54.4% were male;47.3% with Insurance (Seguro Integral de Salud);89.1% were from the capital;66.9% were connected through a phone call;20.9% presented skin problems. The primary identified diagnostic of nursing was Safety and Protection (38.1%);87.4% were referred to medical specialties and 100 % of users expressed their agreement. Main conclusion: Pediatric nursing teletriage/teleorientation, efficient assistance procedure that initiates virtual or face-to-face outpatient consultation, selecting pediatric specialties and providing counseling. This procedure achieved social recognition.

19.
J Med Life ; 15(5): 675-678, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1934914

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus is a life-threatening disease with many devastating psychological, emotional, social, and sexual implications, especially for vulnerable people. This cross-sectional study aimed to assess adolescent health and anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic. 1300 male adolescents filled out the Male Adolescent Health Need Assessment Scale (MAHNAS) and corona-related anxiety scale (CRAS) from January to May 2021. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 22. The mean age of adolescents was 15.5±2.25, and most of them (65%) were studying in high school. The mean scores for physical health were 78±7.55, psychological health 48.8±5.55, social health 48.21±8.61, sexual health 50.35±9.05, and anxiety scores were severe (46.76) in this study. There was a significant negative relationship between anxiety and health needs. The COVID-19 pandemic greatly affected the health needs of adolescents. Effective approaches and policies in this crisis, especially for adolescents, can alleviate the anxious reactions and be a way to meet their health needs appropriately.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adolescent Health , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Health Status , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
BMJ Paediatrics Open ; 6(1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1932769

ABSTRACT

BackgroundThe increased demand for mental healthcare associated with the COVID-19 pandemic adds to the already high unmet mental health needs among paediatric patients, resulting in a declared ‘mental health emergency’. The study objective was to describe paediatric primary care providers (PCPs’) experience of meeting their patients’ needs for mental healthcare during the pandemic and to identify opportunities to optimise care.Methods19 paediatricians and 2 nurse practitioners completed a 30 min video interview in May 2021. Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and transcripts were analysed using consensual qualitative research methods.ResultsParticipants reported marked increases in patient mental health needs during the COVID-19 pandemic. These included new diagnoses of anxiety and depression and increased treatment needs for patients with a prior mental health diagnosis. They identified that the mental health needs of their patients were greater, more severe and more challenging to manage with the resources currently available. While they were frustrated with the lack of communication and support from their mental health colleagues, and felt isolated and overwhelmed, they approached the increased demand for mental healthcare with a growth mindset. This outlook included providing care, seeking help to improve their skills and engaging with local resources such as the Child Psychiatry Access Project (CPAP).ConclusionsOur findings suggest that urgent action is needed to better support paediatric PCPs to provide mental healthcare in our community. Providers identified an ongoing need for timely access to and effective communication with mental health providers to guide care in the medical home. This need could be addressed immediately by providing training for new and experienced clinicians, expanding the scope of CPAP programmes to include patient assessment and supporting implementation of integrated behavioural health programmes into the medical home.

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