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1.
Studies in Psychology ; JOUR(2):311-331, 43.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2106841

ABSTRACT

(Spanish) La Escala de Soledad de Tres Items (Three-Item Loneliness Scale, TIL) es un instrumento breve ampliamente utilizado para la evaluacion de la soledad. El proposito de este estudio fue analizar las propiedades psicometricas de la version espanola de la Escala TIL con datos de dos estudios diferentes. En el Estudio 1, 1,536 adultos con edades comprendidas entre 18 y 88 anos completaron una encuesta durante el periodo de confinamiento debido a la pandemia de la COVID-19. En el Estudio 2, 314 personas mayores con edades comprendidas entre 60 y 92 anos fueron evaluados antes del inicio de la pandemia del COVID-19. Se obtuvieron cargas factoriales significativas mediante el analisis factorial confirmatorio para ambas muestras. La consistencia interna para la escala en ambas muestras fue aceptable. Tambien se hallaron asociaciones positivas entre la Escala TIL y un item unico que media soledad y la sintomatologia depresiva y ansiosa. Los hallazgos respaldan el uso de la Escala TIL con las poblaciones hispanoparlantes. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

2.
International Journal of Nursing Studies ; JOUR: 104385,
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2105098

ABSTRACT

Background Intensive care unit (ICU) nurses are at an increased risk of burnout and may have an intention-to-leave their jobs. The COVID-19 pandemic may increase this risk. Objective The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of burnout risk and intention-to-leave the job and nursing profession among ICU nurses and to analyse the relationships between these variables and the work environment after two years of the COVID-19 pandemic. Design A national cross-sectional survey of all nurses working in Belgian ICUs was conducted between December 2021 and January 2022 during the 4th and 5th waves of the COVID-19 pandemic in Belgium. The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) was used to measure the work environment, intention-to-leave the hospital and/or the profession was assessed. The risk of burnout was assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory scale including emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation, and reduced personal accomplishment. Setting Nurses in 78 out of 123 Belgian hospital sites with an ICU participated in the survey. Participants 2321 out of 4851 nurses (47.8%) completed the entire online survey. Results The median overall risk of burnout per hospital site (high risk in all three subdimensions) was 17.6% [P25: 10.0 - P75: 28.8] and the median proportion of nurses with a high risk in at least one subdimension of burnout in Belgian ICUs was 71.6% [56.7–82.7]. A median of 42.9% [32.1–57.1] of ICU nurses stated that they intended-to-leave the job and 23.8% [15.4–36.8] stated an intent-to-leave the profession. The median overall score of agreement with the presence of positive aspects in the work environment was 49.0% [44.8–55.8]. Overall, nurses working in the top 25% of best-performing hospital sites with regard to work environment had a statistically significant lower risk of burnout and intention-to-leave the job and profession compared to those in the lowest performing 25% of hospital sites. Patient-to-nurse ratio in the worst performing quartile was associated with a higher risk for emotional exhaustion (OR = 1.53, 95% CI:1.04–2.26) and depersonalisation (OR = 1.48, 95% CI:1.03–2.13) and intention-to-leave the job (OR = 1.46, 95% CI:1.03–2.05). Conclusions In this study, a high prevalence of burnout risk and intention-to-leave the job and nursing profession was observed after two years of the COVID-19 pandemic. Nevertheless, there was substantial variation across hospital sites which was associated with the quality of the work environment. Tweetable “Burnout & intention to leave was high for Belgian ICU nurses after 2 years of COVID, but wellbeing was better with high quality work environments and more favourable patient to nurse ratios”.

3.
Data in Brief ; JOUR: 108735,
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2104792

ABSTRACT

The datasets include relevant psychological and demographic variables relating to people's relationships, perceptions, and reactions to the Covid-19 pandemic. Participants were recruited from the United States (N = 396), China (N = 156), and Iran (N = 248). Participants were directed to an online survey that assessed their psychological well-being, affective states, factors related to life satisfaction, and their experiences with the Covid-19 pandemic. For the United States, participants were separated by developmental stage (e.g., young adults between 18 and 35 years old and older adults who were 55 years old or older). Participants from China and Iran were 18 years old or older. Participants from the United States also provided qualitative data in the form of a text-box response where they described their reactions to the Covid-19 pandemic. These data may be relevant for researchers who want to investigate cross-cultural or developmental differences in people's psychological states, perceptions, and reactions in the beginning phases of the Covid-19 pandemic.

4.
Age Ageing ; 51(11)2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2107348

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: regular physical exercise is essential to maintain or improve functional capacity in older adults. Multimorbidity, functional limitation, social barriers and currently, coronavirus disease of 2019, among others, have increased the need for home-based exercise (HBE) programmes and digital health interventions (DHI). Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of HBE programs delivered by DHI on physical function, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) improvement and falls reduction in older adults. DESIGN: systematic review and meta-analysis. PARTICIPANTS: community-dwelling older adults over 65 years. INTERVENTION: exercises at home through DHI. OUTCOMES MEASURES: physical function, HRQoL and falls. RESULTS: twenty-six studies have met the inclusion criteria, including 5,133 participants (range age 69.5 ± 4.0-83.0 ± 6.7). The HBE programmes delivered with DHI improve muscular strength (five times sit-to-stand test, -0.56 s, 95% confidence interval, CI -1.00 to -0.11; P = 0.01), functional capacity (Barthel index, 5.01 points, 95% CI 0.24-9.79; P = 0.04) and HRQoL (SMD 0.18; 95% CI 0.05-0.30; P = 0.004); and reduce events of falls (odds ratio, OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.64-0.93; P = 0.008). In addition, in the subgroup analysis, older adults with diseases improve mobility (SMD -0.23; 95% CI -0.45 to -0.01; P = 0.04), and balance (SMD 0.28; 95% CI 0.09-0.48; P = 0.004). CONCLUSION: the HBE programmes carried out by DHI improve physical function in terms of lower extremity strength and functional capacity. It also significantly reduces the number of falls and improves the HRQoL. In addition, in analysis of only older adults with diseases, it also improves the balance and mobility.


Subject(s)
Exercise , Quality of Life , Humans , Aged , Exercise Therapy , Independent Living
5.
J Aging Soc Policy ; : 1-26, 2022 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106913

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic threatened the ability of nutrition providers to address food insufficiency among older adults. Findings from Household Pulse Survey data and interviews with 23 service leaders in Washington state during the summer of 2020 point to key organizational practices that should inform future emergency food assistance planning. Organizations deeply connected to and trusted by racially and ethnically diverse, unhoused, and low-income older adults are critical to addressing disparities in food insufficiency. Stable and flexible increases in funding would allow these organizations to maintain the effective and culturally-relevant service adaptations they implemented in the first months of the pandemic.

6.
Soc Work Health Care ; : 1-17, 2022 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106804

ABSTRACT

Aging is a natural occurrence often associated with decline in body functioning and common health conditions. With the emergency of new diseases, vulnerable groups like older adults are prone and more possibly to be infected. In the era of COVID-19 pandemic and beyond, health management of older adults becomes demanding with increasing ill-health, morbidity and mortality. This paper aims to investigate caregivers' lived experiences in health care management of older adults amid and post COVID-19 pandemic for quality of life and wellbeing in Nigeria. With the phenomenological approach in qualitative research, we sourced our data using focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews (IDI) from 21 caregivers purposively selected from three health institutions based on their ownership in Nsukka. Data were analyzed thematically. Results revealed that though care-giving is perceived to be filial, it is no longer effectively provided owing to financial and health status of the care recipient. Other findings indicated that factors predicting responds to preventive measures in older adults' health care include disregard of information, inadequate geriatric knowledge and noncompliance of health information. Suggestions to ease challenges in health care demand of older adults were brought to fore. Recommendations were on aligning geriatric professionals in health institutions and health care financing for all older adults in Nigeria.

7.
J Anxiety Disord ; 92: 102633, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2105256

ABSTRACT

A growing body of research examines the COVID-19 pandemic's effects on well-being. Only few studies focus on older adults or explore the predictors of COVID-19-related anxiety. Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) and some behaviors (e.g., avoidance, procrastination) are linked to anxiety among older adults and could both be relevant to consider in a pandemic context. This study measured the occurrence and anxiety levels among older adults and verified the possible role of IU and behaviors in predicting anxiety symptoms, impairment and distress related to COVID-19 health standards. It also examined the indirect effect of IU on symptoms, impairment and distress through behaviors. Participants aged 60 and over (N = 356) were recruited and administered questionnaires. Anxiety levels and symptom impairment were high and appeared to have increased since the beginning of the pandemic. IU and behavioral manifestations of anxiety were associated with higher anxiety symptoms, impairment and distress related to COVID-19 health standards. The indirect effects of IU on the tendency to worry and COVID-19-related anxiety through behavioral manifestations of anxiety were confirmed. This study provides knowledge on the relationship between COVID-19 and anxiety in older adults and identifies predictors relevant to this population.

8.
Nutricion Clinica Y Dietetica Hospitalaria ; JOUR(3):152-159, 42.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2100424

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Skipping meals has been associated with cardiometabolic risk factors such as overweight and insulin re-sistance. Despite this, data on the frequency of meals and the influence on the nutritional and metabolic status of individu-als with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM2) are scarce.Objective: To investigate the correlation between missed meals, body mass index (BMI) and metabolic profile of DM2 patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.Methodology: Cross-sectional study with 107 individuals followed at a Nutrition outpatient clinic of a reference hospi-tal in Fortaleza, Ceara. Socioeconomic, clinical, anthropomet-ric and biochemical data were collected. Meal omission was verified using a 24-hour dietary recall. The correlation be-tween the variables was verified by the Spearman and Chi -Square test, considering p<0.05 as significant.Results: The mean age of participants was 62 +/- 11.34 years, where most were women (57.9%). The mean BMI was 28.67 +/- 5.13 kg/m2 and most were overweight (68%). Participants ate an average of 5 +/- 0.94 meals per day. The median number of meals skipped was 1 (0 -3) and 60.7% skipped at least 1 meal. The most missed meals were supper (41%) and a morning snack (38%). There was a significant positive correlation between the number of skipped meals with BMI and weight.Conclusion: The number of skipped meals is directly cor-related with the nutritional status of older adults and elderly people with DM2.

9.
European Journal of Rheumatology ; JOUR(3):144-147, 9.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2100199

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of this study is to examine the changes in physical activity level, fatigue, depression, and sleep quality in patients with Behcet's disease during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: The study was designed as an online questionnaire applied to individuals who are being followed up with the diagnosis of Behcet's disease in the rheumatology department. Data were -collected using multiple scales including International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Visual Analogue Scale ( VAS) to evaluate physical activity level, fatigue, depression, sleep quality, and pain, respectively. Results: Sixteen patients diagnosed with Behcet's disease were included in the study. No statistically significant difference was observed between the IPAQ, FSS, BDI, PSQI, and VAS assessment scores before COVID-19 and during COVID-19 period (P >.05 for all). Conclusion: Thinking of the negative effects of aggressive clinical symptoms, Behcet's disease patients should be supported in physical activity and psychosocial status.

10.
JMIR Hum Factors ; 8(2): e26043, 2021 Jun 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098981

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As COVID-19 poses different levels of threat to people of different ages, health communication regarding prevention measures such as social distancing and isolation may be strengthened by understanding the unique experiences of various age groups. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine how people of different ages (1) experienced the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and (2) their respective rates and reasons for compliance or noncompliance with social distancing and isolation health guidance. METHODS: We fielded a survey on social media early in the pandemic to examine the emotional impact of COVID-19 and individuals' rates and reasons for noncompliance with public health guidance, using computational and content analytic methods of linguistic analysis. RESULTS: A total of 17,287 participants were surveyed. The majority (n=13,183, 76.3%) were from the United States. Younger (18-31 years), middle-aged (32-44 years and 45-64 years), and older (≥65 years) individuals significantly varied in how they described the impact of COVID-19 on their lives, including their emotional experience, self-focused attention, and topical concerns. Younger individuals were more emotionally negative and self-focused, while middle-aged people were other-focused and concerned with family. The oldest and most at-risk group was most concerned with health-related terms but were lower in anxiety (use of fewer anxiety-related terms) and higher in the use of emotionally positive terms than the other less at-risk age groups. While all groups discussed topics such as acquiring essential supplies, they differentially experienced the impact of school closures and limited social interactions. We also found relatively high rates of noncompliance with COVID-19 prevention measures, such as social distancing and self-isolation, with younger people being more likely to be noncompliant than older people (P<.001). Among the 43.1% (n=7456) of respondents who did not fully comply with health orders, people differed substantially in the reasons they gave for noncompliance. The most common reason for noncompliance was not being able to afford to miss work (n=4273, 57.3%). While work obligations proved challenging for participants across ages, younger people struggled more to find adequate space to self-isolate and manage their mental and physical health; middle-aged people had more concerns regarding childcare; and older people perceived themselves as being able to take sufficient precautions. CONCLUSIONS: Analysis of natural language can provide insight into rapidly developing public health challenges like the COVID-19 pandemic, uncovering individual differences in emotional experiences and health-related behaviors. In this case, our analyses revealed significant differences between different age groups in feelings about and responses to public health orders aimed to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. To improve public compliance with health orders as the pandemic continues, health communication strategies could be made more effective by being tailored to these age-related differences.

11.
Personnel Review ; JOUR
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2097580

ABSTRACT

Purpose - The aim of this article is to extend current debates on organizational equality, diversity and inclusion to a consideration of neurodivergence in the remote workplace context. Design/methodology/approach - Drawing on the ability, motivation, and opportunity (AMO) model and an emerging strength-based approach to neurodiversity, this conceptual paper integrates research on neurodiversity at work and remote working to provide a novel AMO model for a neuro-inclusive remote workplace. Findings - Through a theoretically informed discussion of barriers to effective remote work from the perspective of neurominorities, the AMO model for the neuro-inclusive remote workplace is offered to assist organizations in creating an inclusive remote work environment where both neurominorities and neurotypicals can equally contribute to organizational success. Specific examples of how certain barriers to effective remote work can be mitigated are outlined and explained. Practical implications - The conceptual model presented in this paper can assist HR practitioners in developing a comprehensive approach to skill, motivation, and opportunity-enhancing practices that are tailored to the unique needs of neurominorities in a specific context of remote work to generate mutual gains. Originality/value - The model of interactions between individual and system factors offered enables a better theoretical understanding of the conditions under which high performance of neurodivergent individuals could be achieved with an associated positive impact on their well-being. The paper contributes to recent calls for more equitable and empathetic approaches to investing in employees with different cognitive profiles and does so in the underexplored context of remote work.

12.
International Journal of Behavioral Development ; JOUR
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2098184

ABSTRACT

Lack of social interaction is associated with a heightened sense of loneliness and, in turn, poorer psychological well-being. Despite the prevalence of communicating with others virtually even when physically alone, whether the social interaction-loneliness-well-being relationship is different between face-to-face and virtual interactions and between younger and older adults is relatively understudied. This 21-day diary study examined this question among younger (n = 91;M-age = 22.87) and older (n = 107;M-age = 64.53) Hong Kong participants during the early stage of the COVID-19 pandemic (March-May 2020). We found significant indirect effects of shorter face-to-face interaction time on poorer psychological well-being via a heightened sense of loneliness at the within-person level only among younger adults and at the between-person level only among older adults. Independent of loneliness, spending more time with others on virtual interactions was associated with better psychological well-being only among older adults. Taken together, while the mechanisms may be different across age groups, face-to-face interaction remains an effective way to reduce loneliness and enhance psychological well-being even at times when it is discouraged (e.g., pandemic). Although virtual interaction does not reduce loneliness, its positive impact on older adults' well-being sheds light on the utility of promoting technological acceptance in late adulthood.

13.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 9: 835421, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099159

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection causes a disease (COVID-19) with multisystem involvement. The world is now entering a phase of post-COVID-19 manifestations in this pandemic. Secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (sHLH) is a life-threatening hyperinflammatory event triggered by viral infections, including SARS-CoV-2. Both Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome-Adults (MIS-A) and Cytokine Storm Syndrome (CSS) are considered close differentials of sHLH and add to the spectrum of Post-acute COVID-19 syndrome (PACS). In this report, we presented the case of a middle-aged Asian man who was initially discharged upon recovery from severe COVID-19 infection after 17 days of hospitalization to a private institute and later came to our hospital 13 days post-discharge. Here, he was diagnosed with sHLH, occurring as an extension of CSS, with delayed presentation falling within the spectrum of PACS. The diagnosis of sHLH was made holistically with the HLH-2004 criteria. Our patient initially responded to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and dexamethasone, later complicated by disseminated Candida auris infection and had a fatal outcome. Though many cases of HLH during active COVID-19 and a few cases post COVID-19 recovery have been reported, based on H-score, which has limitations as a diagnostic tool. We report the first case report of post-COVID-19 sHLH using the HLH-2004 criteria, complicated by disseminated Candidemia, emphasizing that the care of patients with COVID-19 does not conclude at the time of hospital discharge. We highlight the importance of surveillance in the post-COVID phase for early detection of sHLH which may predispose to fatal opportunistic infections (OIs).

14.
Journal of Safety Research ; JOUR
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2095709

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Autonomous vehicles (AVs) are considered a promising solution to improve seniors’ safety and mobility. However, to transition to fully automated transportation, especially among seniors, it is vital to assess their perception and attitude toward AVs. This paper investigates seniors’ perceptions and attitudes to a wide range of AV options from the perspective of pedestrians and users in general, as well as during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. Underlying this objective is to examine older pedestrians’ safety perceptions and behaviors at crosswalks in the presence of AVs. Method: A national survey collected data from a sample of 1,000 senior Americans. Using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Cluster Analysis, three clusters of seniors were identified with different demographic characteristics, perceptions, and attitudes toward AVs. Results: PCA findings revealed that “risky pedestrian crossing behavior,” “cautious pedestrian crossing behavior in the presence of AVs,” “positive perception and attitude toward shared AVs,” and “demographic characteristics” were the main components explaining most of the variation within the data, respectively. The PCA factor scores were used in the cluster analysis, which resulted in the identification of three distinctive groups of seniors. Cluster one included individuals with lower demographic scores and a negative perception and attitude toward AVs from the perspective of users and pedestrians. Clusters two and three included individuals with higher demographic scores. Cluster two included individuals with a positive perception toward shared AVs from the user perspective, but a negative attitude toward pedestrian-AV interaction. Cluster three included those with a negative perception toward shared AVs but a somewhat positive attitude toward pedestrian-AV interaction. Practical Applications: The findings of this study provide valuable insights to transportation authorities, AV manufacturers, and researchers regarding older American’s perception and attitude toward AVs as well as their willingness to pay and use Advanced Vehicle Technologies.

15.
Journal of Laboratory Physicians ; JOUR
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2096901

ABSTRACT

Introduction In the ongoing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic, a long hospital stay and empirical broad-spectrum antibiotics make the patients prone to acquire nosocomial infections especially with unconventional organisms, and Chryseobacterium gleum is one such rare nosocomial pathogen. Methods The given study is a case-series-based study conducted from September 2020 to April 2021 in which clinically suspected pneumonia patients who recovered from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) were included. Results Seventeen C. gleum isolates were obtained in pure culture from the tracheal aspirates of nine COVID-19 patients (including repeat samples to rule out colonization) within a period of eight months (September 2020-April 2021). Our records showed that there has been an increase in the number of isolates of C. gleum obtained in respiratory samples in 2020. We also did a review of literature of all the cases of C. gleum pneumonia reported till now. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the isolation of this rare pathogen from COVID-19 patients with clinical significance in a large cohort of patients. Therefore, it becomes important to consider this pathogen as a significant cause of respiratory infections, especially in patients recovered post COVID-19.

16.
Psychol Health Med ; : 1-11, 2022 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097113

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is a public health emergency of international concern. However, its stress on the mental health of young to middle-aged adults is largely unexplored. This study aimed to evaluate the mental health difficulties during the resurgent phase of COVID-19 among young to middle-aged adults in China. There were 1,478 participants with a median age of 26 years (IQR, 23 - 30), including 535 males (36.2%). The prevalence of anxiety, depression, and insomnia were 8.6%, 11.4%, and 13.7%, respectively. Participants aged 29 - 59 years (OR, 95% CI: 2.46, 1.23 - 4.91) and females (2.49, 1.55 - 4.01) had a higher risk of anxiety. Education status, worried level about the current COVID-19, and the level of COVID-19's impact on life were significantly associated with the prevalence of anxiety. Besides, the level of COVID-19's impact on life was positively related to the prevalence of depression and insomnia. Our study provided novel evidence of psychological difficulties among young to middle-aged adults during the resurgent stage of the COVID-19 epidemic. Psychological intervention should be continuously implemented to prevent long-term psychological comorbidities during the COVID-19 epidemic.

17.
Clin Gerontol ; : 1-21, 2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097028

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To systematically review articles that reported the impacts of social isolation on the physical and mental health of healthy older adults during the coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) quarantine. METHODS: Electronic search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Scopus, and BIREME databases. It included cohort and cross-sectional studies published between January 2020 and January 2022 which evaluated the impacts of social isolation on the physical and mental health of older adults during quarantine. The study was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42021269720). RESULTS: Out of 8,505 studies identified, 17 met the inclusion criteria, with moderate to excellent quality. The majority of the older population perceived changes in their physical and mental health. Impacts differed in cohorts according to sex, age group, income, social participation, exercising before and during confinement, and living alone or with other people. CONCLUSIONS: The long period of social isolation dictated by the COVID-19 pandemic caused changes in most older adults`, reducing levels of physical activity and/or generating depression, anxiety, fear, and mood problems. Follow-up studies are necessary to observe the evolution of these impacts. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Public policies must be developed to promote the emotional and physical health of the older adult population in the post-pandemic period.

18.
J Gerontol Soc Work ; : 1-16, 2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096998

ABSTRACT

Health restrictions enacted during the COVID-19 pandemic made it difficult for older adults living in low-income housing (hereinafter referred to as residents) to maintain a routine. The study aimed to explore the ways in which residents carried on, experienced and adapted their activities during the pandemic. An action research study, conducted in cooperation with a community partner, involved nineteen residents who participated in semi-structured interviews inspired by an occupation focused health promotion model. Qualitative data obtained was analyzed using thematic and cross-case analyses. Two thirds of the sample reported a high level of change in their daily routine. The need to connect with others and to live moments of pleasure and joy were the least satisfying dimensions of experience while performing their activities, which was not surprising. Three occupational adaptation profiles were identified based on the residents' perception of changes in routine and their degree of satisfaction with time spent in the different dimensions of experience. Among strategies and resources reported for overcoming the impact of the pandemic on their daily lives, having a supportive social network, access to communication technologies and a positive attitude seemed to be key to residents' successful occupational adaptation.

19.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095560

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has demonstrated the essential role of home care services in supporting community-dwelling older and disabled individuals through a public health emergency. As the pandemic overwhelmed hospitals and nursing homes, home care helped individuals remain in the community and recover from COVID-19 at home. Yet unlike many institutional providers, home care agencies were often disconnected from broader public health disaster planning efforts and struggled to access basic resources, jeopardizing the workers who provide this care and the medically complex and often marginalized patients they support. The exclusion of home care from the broader COVID-19 emergency response underscores how the home care industry operates apart from the traditional health care infrastructure, even as its workers provide essential long-term care services. This special article (1) describes the experiences of home health care workers and their agencies during COVID-19 by summarizing existing empiric research; (2) reflects on how these experiences were shaped and exacerbated by longstanding challenges in the home care industry; and (3) identifies implications for future disaster preparedness policies and practice to better serve this workforce, the home care industry, and those for whom they care.

20.
Revista Espanola De Salud Publica ; JOUR, 96.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2092165

ABSTRACT

After about a year and a half (at the moment these lines are being written) since the start of the massive vaccination campaign in which, thanks to the high coverage achieved in all groups eligible for vaccination, it has been possible to significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality due to COVID-19, it is important to review the scientific basics that have supported the recommendations implemented to date and those that could be adopted in the near future taking into consideration the epidemiological situation. The objective of this article is, therefore, to address the foundations of some of the technical decisions proposed by the Committee on Programme and Registry of Vaccinations (National Immunization Technical Advisory Group in Spain) and the Technical Working Group on Vaccination against COVID-19. Throughout the eleven updates of the Vaccination Strategy against COVID-19 in Spain, several issues pose intense debate as the vaccination intervals between doses, the convenience of using different types of vaccines, the use of heterologous schemes of vaccination, the benefits of hybrid immunity and the use of a fourth dose (second booster dose) for se-lected populations. All this without forgetting essential aspects of safety of vaccines. This article is divided into the following sections: Vaccination intervals;Heterologous or mixed scheme;Hybrid immunity (vaccination after infection and infection after vaccination [breakthrough]);Second booster dose.

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