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1.
J Palliat Med ; 25(10): 1606-1609, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2051226

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic brings with it a significant number of post-COVID symptoms, including persistent dyspnea and neuropsychological sequelae. The palliative approach in the treatment of these refractory symptoms is effective and widely applicable in different settings. We report the case of a patient with refractory dyspnea admitted to a specialized palliative care unit with a very poor prognosis. The application of different tools of the palliative approach proved to be effective: a detailed advanced care planning and open communication, the respect for the patient's wishes and optimal use of his resources-the salutogenesis- an adaptation of the rhythm of care to that of the patient. The patient was then discharged for rehabilitation, and finally returned home.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Dyspnea/etiology , Dyspnea/therapy , Humans , Male , Palliative Care/methods , Prognosis
2.
BMC Palliat Care ; 21(1): 144, 2022 Aug 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993353

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has challenged health care systems worldwide. In Germany, patients in a palliative care setting have the opportunity to receive treatment by a specialised mobile outpatient palliative care team (OPC). The given retrospective single centre analysis describes the use of OPC structures for terminally ill COVID-19 patients during the height of the pandemic in Germany and aims to characterise this exceptional OPC patient collective. METHODS: First, death certificates were analysed in order to collect data about the place of death of all deceased COVID-19 patients (n = 471) within our local governance district. Second, we investigated whether advance care planning structures were established in local nursing homes (n = 30) during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. Third, we examined patient characteristics of COVID-19 negative (n = 1579) and COVID-19 positive (n = 28) patients treated by our tertiary care centre guided OPC service. RESULTS: The analysis of death certificates in our local district revealed that only 2.1% of all deceased COVID-19 patients had succumbed at their home address (n = 10/471). In contrast, 34.0% of COVID-19 patients died in nursing homes (n = 160/471), whereas 63.5% died in an inpatient hospital setting (n = 299/471). A large proportion of these hospitalised patients died on non-intensive care unit wards (38.8%). Approximately 33.0% of surveyed nursing homes had a palliative care council service and 40.0% of them offered advance care planning (ACP) structures for their nursing home residents. In our two OPC collectives we observed significant differences concerning clinical characteristics such as the Index of Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group [ECOG] (p = 0.014), oncologic comorbidity (p = 0.004), as well as referrer and primary patient location (p = 0.001, p = 0.033). CONCLUSIONS: Most COVID-19 patients in our governance district died in an inpatient setting. However, the highest number of COVID-19 patients in our governance district who died in an outpatient setting passed away in nursing homes where palliative care structures should be further expanded. COVID-19 patients who died under the care of our OPC service had considerably fewer oncologic comorbidities. Finally, to relieve conventional health care structures, we propose the expansion of established OPC structures for treating terminally ill COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Palliative Care , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Outpatients , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
3.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 23(8): 1274-1278, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1895134

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess short- and long-term mortality and risk factors in nursing home patients with COVID-19 infection. DESIGN: Retrospective 2-center cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Dutch nursing home patients with clinically suspected COVID-19 infection confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction testing. METHODS: Data were gathered between March 2020 and November 2020 using electronic medical records, including demographic characteristics, comorbidities, medical management, and symptoms on the first day of suspected COVID-19 infection. Mortality at 30 days and 6 months was assessed using multivariate logistic regression models and Kaplan-Meier analysis. At 6 months, a subgroup analysis was performed to estimate the mortality risk between COVID-negative patients and patients who survived COVID-19. Risk factors for mortality were assessed through multivariate logistic regression models. RESULTS: A total of 321 patients with suspected COVID-19 infection were included, of whom 134 tested positive. Sixty-two patients in the positive group died at 30 days, with a short-term mortality rate of 2.9 (95% CI 1.7-5.3). Risk factors were fatigue (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.3-6.2) and deoxygenation (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.3-7.6). At 6 months, the mortality risk was 2.1 (95% CI 1.3-3.7). Risk factors for 6-month mortality were shortness of breath (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-7.0), deoxygenation (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1-6.5) and medical management (OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.7-25.8). However, among patients who survived COVID-19 infection, the long-term mortality risk was not sustained (OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.4-2.7). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Overall, COVID-19 infection increases short- and long-term mortality risk among nursing home patients. However, this study shows that surviving COVID-19 infection does not lead to increased mortality in the long term within this population. Therefore, advanced care planning should focus on quality of life among nursing home patients after COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Humans , Nursing Homes , Quality of Life , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 83(7-B):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1857276

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a brief educational module on the self-reported knowledge, confidence, and intent of generalist clinicians to conduct goals-of-care conversations with hospitalized COVID-19 patients at the Southern Arizona Veterans Affairs Health Care System (SAVAHCS) in Tucson, Arizona.Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to an influx of seriously ill hospitalized patients who need their goals of care rapidly established to guide medical treatment decisions. Generalist clinicians have had to conduct these conversations more frequently due to large patient volumes and a shortage of palliative care specialists. However, generalists often report feeling underprepared due to limited formal goals-of-care communication training. Several recent studies have shown that educational interventions can improve goals-of-care-related knowledge, confidence, and skill levels. The Reframe, Expect emotion, Map outpatient goals, Align with goals, and Propose a plan (REMAP) communication framework is a structured, evidence-based approach to goals-of-care conversations that has been shown to increase the knowledge, confidence, and skill levels of generalists across multiple disciplines.Methods: Generalists at the SAVAHCS completed a web-based educational module that demonstrated the application of the REMAP framework to a COVID-specific case scenario. Participants completed pre- and post-intervention questionaries. Primary outcomes were changes in self-reported knowledge and confidence levels. Secondary outcomes included post-intervention feelings of preparedness and intention to conduct goals-of-care conversations.Results: Three participants completed the pre- and post-intervention questionnaires. All three participants reported an increase in their knowledge levels, and two out of three reported an increase in their confidence levels. Neither of the differences in means was statistically significant. All three participants strongly agreed that they felt more prepared and had a stronger intention to conduct goals-of-care conversations after completing the module. All participants agreed that participation in the project would change or improve their practice.Conclusions: The results of this project suggest that a brief online educational module that demonstrates the application of an evidence-based goals-of-care communication framework can improve generalists' knowledge, confidence, and intent to conduct goals-of-care conversations with hospitalized COVID-19 patients. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

5.
Eur J Cancer ; 160: 261-272, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719649

ABSTRACT

AIM OF THE STUDY: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic significantly impacted cancer care. In this study, clinical patient characteristics related to COVID-19 outcomes and advanced care planning, in terms of non-oncological treatment restrictions (e.g. do-not-resuscitate codes), were studied in patients with cancer and COVID-19. METHODS: The Dutch Oncology COVID-19 Consortium registry was launched in March 2020 in 45 hospitals in the Netherlands, primarily to identify risk factors of a severe COVID-19 outcome in patients with cancer. Here, an updated analysis of the registry was performed, and treatment restrictions (e.g. do-not-intubate codes) were studied in relation to COVID-19 outcomes in patients with cancer. Oncological treatment restrictions were not taken into account. RESULTS: Between 27th March 2020 and 4th February 2021, 1360 patients with cancer and COVID-19 were registered. Follow-up data of 830 patients could be validated for this analysis. Overall, 230 of 830 (27.7%) patients died of COVID-19, and 60% of the remaining 600 patients with resolved COVID-19 were admitted to the hospital. Patients with haematological malignancies or lung cancer had a higher risk of a fatal outcome than other solid tumours. No correlation between anticancer therapies and the risk of a fatal COVID-19 outcome was found. In terms of end-of-life communication, 50% of all patients had restrictions regarding life-prolonging treatment (e.g. do-not-intubate codes). Most identified patients with treatment restrictions had risk factors associated with fatal COVID-19 outcome. CONCLUSION: There was no evidence of a negative impact of anticancer therapies on COVID-19 outcomes. Timely end-of-life communication as part of advanced care planning could save patients from prolonged suffering and decrease burden in intensive care units. Early discussion of treatment restrictions should therefore be part of routine oncological care, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Life Support Care/statistics & numerical data , Mortality/trends , Neoplasms/mortality , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Withholding Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Neoplasms/virology , Netherlands/epidemiology , Prognosis , Risk Factors , Survival Rate
6.
Rev Malad Respir Actual ; 13(2): 2S244-2S251, 2021 Sep.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472207

ABSTRACT

When a lung cancer patient develops an organ failure, the intensity of the care should be decided taking into account patient's wishes and his plan of carekeeping, in mind that the objective of an intensive care unit (ICU) admission is to allow the patient to be discharged from ICU and hospital with an acceptable quality of life. But the physician in charge of the patient at the time of acute disease often does not have these information. It is therefore essential that the referring oncologist had an early discussion with the patient to inform him and collect his opinion. These information have to be noted in the patient's medical chart. The prognostic criteria of lung cancer patients admitted in ICU are related to the patient's characteristics, the cancer's characteristics and the severity of acute disease. In order that a decision of ICU admission is in accordance with the patient's therapeutic project, a close discussion between the oncologist and the intensivist is essential, especially in this period of SARS-CoV2 pandemy.© 2021 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

7.
Gerontology ; 66(5): 427-430, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066968

ABSTRACT

The large scale and rapid spread of the current COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way hospitals and other health services operate. Opportunities for patient-centered decision-making at the end of life are being jeopardized by a scarcity of health system resources. In response, the traditional doctor-initiated advanced care planning (ACP) for critical illness may also need to be readjusted. We propose nurse-led and allied health-led ACP discussions to ensure patient and family inclusion and understanding of the disease prognosis, prevention of overtreatment, and potential outcomes in crisis times. We highlight known barriers and list enablers, long-term and short-term opportunities to assist in the culture change.


Subject(s)
Advance Care Planning , Betacoronavirus , Communication , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Medical Overuse/prevention & control , Nurse's Role , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Social Workers , COVID-19 , Decision Making , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Terminal Care
8.
BMC Palliat Care ; 20(1): 10, 2021 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021391

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Observational studies investigating risk factors in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have not considered the confounding effects of advanced care planning, such that a valid picture of risk for elderly, frail and multi-morbid patients is unknown. We aimed to report ceiling of care and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) decisions and their association with demographic and clinical characteristics as well as outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Retrospective, observational study conducted between 5th March and 7th May 2020 of all hospitalised patients with COVID-19. Ceiling of care and CPR decisions were documented using the Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care and Treatment (ReSPECT) process. Unadjusted and multivariable regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with ceiling of care decisions and death during hospitalisation. RESULTS: A total of 485 patients were included, of whom 409 (84·3%) had a documented ceiling of care; level one for 208 (50·9%), level two for 75 (18·3%) and level three for 126 (30·8%). CPR decisions were documented for 451 (93·0%) of whom 336 (74·5%) were 'not for resuscitation'. Advanced age, frailty, White-European ethnicity, a diagnosis of any co-morbidity and receipt of cardiovascular medications were associated with ceiling of care decisions. In a multivariable model only advanced age (odds 0·89, 0·86-0·93 p < 0·001), frailty (odds 0·48, 0·38-0·60, p < 0·001) and the cumulative number of co-morbidities (odds 0·72, 0·52-1·0, p = 0·048) were independently associated. Death during hospitalisation was independently associated with age, frailty and requirement for level two or three care. CONCLUSION: Ceiling of care decisions were made for the majority of patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, broadly in line with known predictors of poor outcomes in COVID-19, but with a focus on co-morbidities suggesting ICU admission might not be a reliable end-point for observational studies where advanced care planning is routine.


Subject(s)
Advance Care Planning , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Decision-Making , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Female , Humans , Life Support Care , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
9.
Rev Cardiovasc Med ; 21(4): 577-581, 2020 12 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005369

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the newly discovered virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), had been noticed to have high morbidity and mortality. Apart from pneumonia, COVID-19 can also cause damage to the cardiovascular system, and co-occurring with cardiovascular injury leads to a poorer prognosis. Besides, amid the pandemic of COVID-19, the management of critical cardiovascular events needs to further account for the highly infectious coronavirus, prompt and optimal treatments, clinician's safety, and healthcare provider's capacity. This review article aims to provide more comprehensive and appropriate guidance for the management of critical cardiovascular disease, including ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-STEMI acute coronary syndrome, cardiogenic shock, acute heart failure, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and advanced care planning, during the COVID-19 epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Disease Management , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Disease , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Humans
10.
J Infect Chemother ; 27(2): 413-417, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-957211

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Clusters of novel coronavirus infectious disease of 2019 (COVID-19) have spread to become a global pandemic imposing a significant burden on healthcare systems. The lack of an effective treatment and the emergence of varied and complicated clinical courses in certain populations have rendered treatment of patients hospitalized for COVID-19 difficult. METHODS: Tokyo Metropolitan Tama Medical Center, a public tertiary acute care center located in Tokyo, the epicenter of COVID-19 in Japan, has been admitting patients with COVID-19 since February 2020. The present, retrospective, case-series study aimed to investigate the clinical course and outcomes of patients with COVID-19 hospitalized at the study institution. RESULTS: In total, 101 patients with COVID-19 were admitted to our hospital to receive inpatient care. Eleven patients (10.9%) received ECMO, and nine patients (8.9%) died during hospitalization after COVID-19 was diagnosed. A history of smoking and obesity were most commonly encountered among patients with a complicated clinical course. Most patients who died requested to be transferred to advanced palliative care in the early course of their hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: Our experience of caring for these patients demonstrated a relatively lower mortality rate and higher survival rate in those with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation placement than previous reports from other countries and underscored the importance of proactive, advanced care planning in the early course of hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Tertiary Care Centers , Adolescent , Adult , Advance Care Planning , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/mortality , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Smoking/epidemiology , Survival Rate , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
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