Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 39
Filter
1.
Nigerian Journal of Animal Production ; 49(3):195-212, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2040729

ABSTRACT

The current COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the agricultural value chains in Nigeria to economic uncertainties with the livestock sector at the receiving end of the impact of the accompanying effects. The present study assessed the extent of the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on livestockfarmers. Aweb-based cross-sectional online questionnaire survey was conducted in randomly selected 12 States in Nigeria. Data gathered through the questionnaire included;respondents' demographic characteristics, knowledge and attitude regarding COVID-19 pandemic, extent of impact of the pandemic, farm activities severely affected and mitigation efforts made by the affected livestock farmers. Data obtained were analyzed using descriptive statistics, including frequency count, percentage, mean and confidence interval set at p<0.05. This study revealed that majority (73%) of the livestock farmers were aware of COVID-19 pandemic, 66% practiced intensive farming system while 62% were into poultry production. Knowledge and attitude of livestock farmers regarding COVID-19 revealed that 86% of the respondents believed that COVID-19 did not have a specific drug for treatment, 97% agreed with the principle of hand washing, 70% had hand washing stations on their farms while 59% believed that animals could be infected with the disease. Of the extent of the impact of COVID-19, 42% claimed to have had high blood pressure, 80% lacked funds to run their farms while 27% witnessed the loss of loved ones, 86% of the farmers were severely affected in marketing of their products and services;72%, 52% and 72% were affected in restocking, farm cleaning and transportation, respectively. As a result of the pandemic, 39% sought for loans and reduced labour, 24% stopped payment of salaries while 23% reduced the quantity and quality of feeds given to their animals. The present study highlighted the devastating effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the livestock industry in Nigeria. Therefore, concerted efforts to ensure the survival of the livestock industry must be put in place by individuals and the government at large to salvage current situation and emergency preparedness protocol should be put in place in case of future occurrence.

2.
IOP Conference Series : Earth and Environmental Science ; 92, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2017614

ABSTRACT

Air pollution in the environment in which poultry is raised is one of the most serious problems facing the poultry sector across various aspects of production. Perhaps the most dangerous gas emitted from poultry houses is ammonia. The high concentrations of this gas in the air above the permissible limits (15 ppm) will have disastrous consequences. Ammonia directly affects the health and safety of birds, as it is a cause of ammonia blindness in birds accompanied by many respiratory diseases that destroy production and increase breeding costs. In addition, high concentrations of ammonia (above 20 ppm) contribute to enhancing the infection of birds with Newcastle and the bronchitis virus. In general, the greenhouse gases emitted from poultry houses included four main gases (carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane and hydrogen sulphide). Studies regarding their direct effects on the health and productivity of birds have been insufficient. In the direct form, as the concentrations of greenhouse gases rise to very high limits, they cause suffocation and death., the behaviour of the greenhouse gases in the indirect effect is reflected being a source of nutritional stress and a group of diseases and parasites which lead to a decrease in productivity levels. The intensity and concentrations of gas emissions are directly related to many factors such as geographic location, the season of the year, ventilation technologies, humidity, litter quality, nutritional status and stocking density. The advances in ventilation technologies have played a key role in expelling all harmful gases, especially those that depend on negative pressure. However, greenhouse gases remain a real threat to the poultry industry in particular and to the planet's environment in general.

3.
Russian Journal of Agricultural and Socio Economic Sciences ; 8(128):135-140, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2012668

ABSTRACT

The study was undertaken to examine the effect of COVID 19 Lockdown among day Old Chick Producers and Marketers in Ibadan South West Local Government Area (Poultry hub) of Oyo State, through the administration of questionnaire and interpersonal interview to retrieve relevant research information. The socio-economic appraiser of the stakeholders revealed that participants are predominantly male(65%), married(61.0%), most are educated (88.0%) and were Christians (40.0%) and Muslims (60.0%) based on their religious faith. Effect of Lockdown on production (100%), reduction in price, cost of ingredients with consequential reduction in level of employment. The result also reveals that the cost of ingredients, was seriously affected before (80.0%), during (65.0%) and after (98.0%) COVID-19 pandemic respectively. The result shows that the mean of the total variable cost is N28325.98, the mean of the gross margin is also positive (N322307.44), the net income is (N 272380.21) while the mean of the total fixed cost is (N400428.00). This implies that the level of profitability of poultry production in the study area is profitable. Based on the findings, it has been identified that some factors are hindering the development of poultry farms as regards large production, which will cater for the entire population of the people in the study area and the nation entirely. It therefore recommends that government should improve on the loan credit guarantee schemes available for the public and ensure the availability of well-tested, highly productive machines and reduce cost of feed.

4.
Russian Journal of Agricultural and Socio Economic Sciences ; 8(128):167-175, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2012667

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus has a significant impact on both the poultry industry and individual households. The pandemic's rapid spread has a significant impact on the country, leading to a total lockdown. As a result, the study focused on the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on egg production and income of marketers among poultry farmers in Ido Local Government, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. A total of 120 questionnaires were distributed. The respondents were chosen using a multi-stage randomization technique. The descriptive, budgetary technique was used to analyze the socioeconomic characteristics of the respondents, the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on egg marketing, and the challenges faced by poultry farmers in egg marketing, while the budgetary technique was used to analyze the cost and return of egg marketing in the study area. Females had the highest percentage of respondents with the highest socioeconomic characteristics, according to the findings (80.8%). The majority of respondents (96.8%) were between the ages of 31 and 60, and the vast majority was married (94.2%). It was also revealed that the majority of poultry farmers (92.5%) had formal education and that the majority of them (67.5%) practiced Christianity. According to the budgetary analysis, the average variable cost incurred by the farmers polled was 33764.85. It also revealed that the total fixed cost was 388392.98 and the total production cost was 422157.83. The profitability index was 0.38, indicating that poultry egg farmers in the study area earned N0.38 for each naira invested in production. The presence of COVID 19 was statistically significant in determining the level of income of poultry farmers. High input costs, product marketing, a lack of storage facilities, disease outbreaks, insufficient feed formulation ingredients, a lack of extension services, and movement restrictions were some of the challenges faced by poultry farmers and egg marketers in Ido Local Government. To keep poultry production afloat during and after the COVID-19 pandemic, the government should provide expanded income support to affected farms, as well as tax deferment or waiver, and lower interest rates.

5.
Archives of Razi Institute ; 77(5):1611-1619, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2002783

ABSTRACT

Infectious bronchitis (IB) disease, avian Infectious Bronchitis disease in one of the major cause of respiratory problems and economic loss in poultry industry, even in developed countries with good biosecurity practice. Since the first isolation of the virus in 1931, a lot of serotypes and genotypes of the virus have been reported around the world. The GI-1 lineage, including Massachusetts (Mass) serotype viruses, is one of the most widely spread types worldwide. Moreover, the GI-23 lineage with a growing incidence rate was reported approximately 20 years ago in the Middle East, with no or little homologues vaccine use. The genotype was previously restricted to the Middle East;now, there is evidence that it has spread to European countries, raising concerns regarding potential outbreaks. In the present study, our attempt was to phylogenetically analyze the S1 gene of six isolates from Massachusetts and variant 2 genotypes, which were isolated from broiler and broiler breeder flocks in Iran. The variant 2 viruses were compared to other reported variant 2 viruses from neighboring countries and they had more than 98% identity with the latest reported Iranian variant 2. In addition, Three Mass type viruses were similar to vaccine strains which may be shows continuous circulation of vaccine viruses in the field. This event can cause increasing the risk of their mutation or even reversion to virulence after several passages in natural host, furthermore circulating viruses may recombinant with virulent field viruses and cause emergence of new variants. Considering the variable nature of IB viruses in which few changes lead to important differences, continuous epidemiological surveillance along with clinical studies of new isolates, are crucial to a better understanding of their pathogenicity and subsequent disease control.

6.
Scientific Papers Series Management, Economic Engineering in Agriculture and Rural Development ; 22(2):543-550, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1958247

ABSTRACT

Animal health and diseases have a major impact on human health and behaviour (i.e. zoonosis, schools, communication etc), food production (African Swine Fever), economy (direct and indirect costs) and trade (export, import, intercommunity trade). Even almost all countries have implemented all kind of management measures, humanity still face up today huge problems, for example the most recent experience, being COVID-19, which ceased almost all human activities in the world and changed people behaviour for several years (2019 up today). For this reason, the paper represents a systemic review of recent information on different management indicators developed - epidemiological/economic etc in order to assist managers (politically, authorities, farmers, all the people involved) to prevent, survey and control such diseases, to develop best practices for benchmarking their country health systems/farm management system etc, and finally to led to an effective and efficient management of infectious disease in livestock during crisis. In this regard, the retrospective method was used and the information reviewed was collected from the latest information published between 2019-2022, available on WHO, Economic Impact, CDC websites, where through a tremendous and collaborative effort across different public health organisations, scientists in the world, dashboards and standard indicators publicly available have been developed. The results of this study demonstrate that the managers of livestock during crisis, the competent authorities, the governments have to consider, undertake and include these kind of tools/indicators in their management in order to assist them to develop their emergency preparedness capacity and to manage in an effective way the infectious diseases during crisis respectively prevention, early detection, rapid response, identifying their vulnerabilities etc.

7.
Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology ; 22(6):1-5, 2020.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1919033

ABSTRACT

To investigate the effect of COVID-19 on beef cattle production in China, in February 2020, 263 beef cattle farms 21 provinces of China were surveyed, covering the main areas of beef cattle production. The results showed that COVID-19 had a serious impact on Chinese beef cattle industry. In forage stock, 48% of the beef cattle farms had surpluses for I month;45% had less than 2 months of forage, and 95% had run out of by-products, such as distiller's grains. In fattening production. 95% of fattening cattle farms cannot buy stocker cattle as planned. The delay to sell fattening cattle increased the consumption of feed and forage. The markets for live cattle were closed, causing the decrease of cattle prices. In reproduction, brood cows missed one or two estrus cycles. In disease prevention and control, 70% of cattle farms almost ran out of medicines, and immunities cannot be carried out as planned. To solve these prominent problems, it was suggested that beef cattle farms should seriously implement the prevention and control requirements to ensure safety;prepare alternative plans for epidemic prevention and control in advance;improve the tine feeding and management system and standardized workflow, adjust the business strategy, etc. Additionally, it was also suggested that all layers of governments should open green channels for the farms to ensure the transportation of production means and products, supply special subsidy policies, and provide loans to help farm enhance confidence and resume production.

8.
Journal of Agricultural Extension ; 26(1 (Annual Conference):129-137, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1911916

ABSTRACT

The study investigated the enterprise training needs of poultry farmers during COVID-19 Pandemic in Enugu State, Nigeria. Multistage sampling procedure was used to select one hundred and eight (108) respondents from the six agricultural zones in the State. Data were collected using semi-structured interview schedule and analyzed using Percentages and mean score. Findings indicated that (100.0%) of the respondents produced live chicken alone, 88% indicated that they never had any visits from extension agents before and during COVID-19 Pandemic. Also, results revealed that the cost of feeds increased by 88% during the Pandemic. In addition, the major constraints faced by the respondents during pandemic were;scarcity of trained labour (= 3.76), theft (= 3.63), rotting of eggs (= 3.55) and shortage of feeds (= 3.52). The study revealed that farmers needed trainings in the areas of flow of funds (98.1%) and feed formulations (73.1%) during COVID-19 Pandemic. Extension should therefore provide training for farmers on how to access fund during emergencies. Also, farmers should be trained on feed formulation so that they can be able to produce the feed they need during emergencies like COVID-19 Pandemic. Government should make available agricultural grants to farmers which will enable them bounce back especially during emergencies.

9.
Journal of Agricultural Extension ; 26(1 (Annual Conference):11-20, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1911910

ABSTRACT

This study examined the adaptation strategies to the consequence of COVID-19 pandemic on Poultry Farmers in Oyo State. Multistage sampling procedure was employed to select five Key Informants and five Focus Group Discussion from the respondents respectively. Data on effects of lockdown, coping strategies and role of PAN were collected and analysed using constant comparison analysis. The effects of pandemic in severity order include, poor marketing due to collapse of the standard delivery system (85%);glut of the poultry products (80%), laying stock reduction (25%)and folding up of the enterprise (15%) burying of unsold bad eggs (5%). Coping strategies employed were sourcing financial support from cooperative societies (85%), sold produce on credit (75%) and sourcing ICT-based marketing information (70%). The role played by PAN include taking exemption letter from Police (Police wireless message) to move poultry products for sale;mediating unfavourable government taxation and relevant information dissemination via WhatsApp group platform. There is the need to develop an emergency's-smart resilience programme for the poultry industry. Measures adopted to manage emergencies such as COVID-19 should not impede the flow of agricultural products and inputs from the onset.

10.
Malaysian Journal of Veterinary Research ; 12(2):11-16, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904870

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. COVID-19 is contagious and fatal to humans. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, significant concerns on food safety and security are rising due to potential interspecies transmission. As such, surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 on imported meat and animal parts is carried out and reported in this study to safeguard food safety and security. Overall, none of the 225 samples from various livestock (buffaloes, cattle, goat and pig) imported from seven countries were tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 with quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) from July 2020 to November 2021. This study finding serves as a baseline data for SARS-CoV-2 in imported meat and animal parts. Notably, this study accentuated the importance of active surveillance to prevent zoonosis and to safeguard food safety and security.

11.
Journal of Food Distribution Research ; 53(1):5-6, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904813

ABSTRACT

The American Rescue Funds Program seeks improvements to infrastructure, capacity, and diversification in meat and poultry processing, with clear prioritization of increased competition via small- and medium-sized processing facilities. The need to euthanize animals at a time when retailers were rationing meat sales was one of several examples of market failures during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture estimated the disruptions to agricultural meat, poultry, and egg production at $15 billion based on CFAP and CFAP2 payments. Marani et al. (2021) estimate the probability of a repeat event at 1% to 2% per year, justifying the use of these public funds to add surplus capacity and infrastructure to mitigate disruptions in case of recurrence. Economics of scale are modest beyond slaughter of more than 125 head per hour in beef plants and 2,000 head per day in pork plants (Duewer and Nelson, 1991;Ollinger, MacDonald, and Madison, 2005). Dozens of such "medium-sized" U.S. pork and beef processing plants have survived since 2000, typically relying upon niche market connections. Given historic processing plant construction costs for medium-sized plants (Aherin, 333333 2021) and an assumed 20% USDA grant to incentivize construction, a $100 million expenditure on each of the beef and pork plants creates an opportunity to add as much as 5% additional capacity for each species, easing current capacity as the industries prepare for local and export growth. Whether producer-ownership of capacity can generate stability and additional benefits in the supply chains is of key interest. Models of producer ownership-including cooperatives and carefully structured LLCs-allow livestock producers to capture processing margins and remove some of the price uncertainty around live animal prices to the plant and producer. It follows, too, that producer-ownership can therefore reduce the ability of existing larger plants to poach supply from medium-sized plants during the crucial startup phase and ensure that plants run at optimum capacity. A significant portion of the additional capacity added to the pork industry in the last 15 years exhibited some form of producer ownership. Anecdotally, the pork and beef sectors may be moving away from commodity production and into systems that maintain animal identity from farm to consumer. Producers have an opportunity to capitalize on this shift by collectively investing in medium-sized plants with the ability to preserve identity and be more responsive to evolving consumer preferences. An overarching concern is of the need to maintain capacity into the future and the potential of existing packers to acquire this subsidized capacity should medium sized processing fail.

12.
Indian Journal of Poultry Science ; 56(1):75-80, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1876085

ABSTRACT

A well-structured specifically developed questionnaire with 31 questions was circulated among residents in Tamil Nadu via social networking sites such as Facebook, Email, WhatsApp, and Twitter starting on 1411' August 2020 to 24m August 2020.181 out of 350 participants contacted, responded to the online survey (52%). Among the respondents (181), 30%, 21%, and 0.3% were male, female, and third gender, respectively. There was no substantial change in the consumption pattern of eggs during the COVID-19 lock-down period. However, there was a 5% reduction in the consumption of poultry meat and egg on Sunday's during the COVID-19 lock-down period. There was a marginal increase in the purchase of poultry eggs among the respondents who usually buy less than 6 eggs per week for their family and a marginal reduction in the (-4%) in the purchase of poultry eggs among the respondents purchasing 12-24 eggs per week for their family. The regular quantity of chicken meat consumed per family per week is up to 2 kgs. There was a 6% reduction in the consumption of chicken meat among the respondents consuming 1 to 2 kg per week for their family during the COVID-19 lock-down period. This survey highlights the need for constant awareness among the general public as 36% of respondents were unaware of the about non-transmission of COVID-19 through chicken meat and egg. fry.

13.
International Journal of Life Sciences ; - (A16):1-4, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1871434

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 is a major and wide global issue concern to the health of human being, it can lead to various severe problems created adverse impact on various agro-based sectors including poultry farming. Researchers from different fields have studied about the issues and have addressed the possible impacts of COVID-19 on variety of complex issues and problems associated with the poultry farming. Therefore, the present study aimed at to assessed the condition and challenges of COVID-19 by linking its impact on poultry farming with dependent peoples. The pandemic and lockdown impacted the overall poultry production system. This creates a results in drastic reduced value of consumption of poultry products. The study was conducted based on primary data collection, during the same period and its connection with poultry farming, its production, demand and supply was analyzed. Due to the situation of COVID-19 farmers faced various issues related to their need like low income, labor issues, starting of production, transportation problems, low demand of consumers, financial issues were identified. The present study shows that the impact of COVID-19 and its overall scenario on three different selected poultry farms in Aurangabad district. To assessing the impact on these farming a systematic study carried out with the help of collection of primary data from the study area, which provides the information about the impact on different parameters in the poultry farming.

14.
Agricultural Economics ; 15(4), 2022.
Article in Persian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1841782

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The Covid-19 virus pandemic has affected the entire world and all economic sectors. The agricultural sector has been affected by this crisis from various dimensions, too. The broiler industry is the largest industry in Kurdistan province, which has been affected by this pandemic in various ways, such as supply chain of inputs, changes in supply and demand structures. The broiler industry of Kurdistan province has directly and indirectly created employment for about 14,000 people. Kurdistan province has more than 750 active broiler farms, which use about 15 million broiler chicken pieces in each period and 60 million pieces per year. Kurdistan province produces about 4% of the country's chicken meat. This study aims to investigate and estimate the implications of the Corona pandemic on production, performance and economic efficiency of broiler farms in Sanandaj township, Kurdistan province, Iran. Materials and Methode: Production and performance criteria were extracted from summarizing and comparing data in Excel software. To estimate the efficiency criteria by data envelopment analysis model, DEAP software was used;and in order to evaluate the difference between the means, the matched-pairs t-test was conducted in SPSS software. Necessary data were obtained through a simple random sampling method. The collected data were related to two breeding periods in autumn 2019 before the pandemic, and autumn 2020 after the pandemic. All production, performance and efficiency measures calculated and compared in pre-pandemic and post-pandemic periods. Results and discussion: The results showed that the total number of day-old chicks in pre-pandemic and post-pandemic periods was not significantly different. Total production of small and medium farms decreased slightly in the post-pandemic period;whilst total production in large farms, due to the increase in weight of chickens, not only did not decrease but also increased significantly. The grain-to-chicken conversion ratio increased on all farms, so that more grain was used to produce one kilogram of chicken, in the post-pandemic period. The reason for this could probably be the irregularity in the sales process and the increase in the number of storage days. The age of slaughter increased in all farms in the post-pandemic period, significantly. Due to the increase in slaughter age, the average weight of chickens at slaughter also increased significantly. Furthermore, the percentage of losses in all farms showed a significant increase. Regarding efficiency, no significant difference was found in the average technical efficiency of broiler farms before and after the corona outbreak. Nevertheless, the difference between the average allocation and economic efficiency of the farms in the pre-pandemic and post-pandemic periods were significant;In all three capacity groups, there was a significant decrease in both allocation efficiency and economic efficiency in the post-pandemic period. Suggestion: The results showed a significant decrease in allocative and economic efficiency of the farms in post-pandemic relative to pre-pandemic periods, therefore, more attention is needed by managers and policy makers in the private and public sectors to develop and implement a special and alternative program for emergencies like COVID-pandemic. In order to limit the reduction of allocation and economic efficiency, which play an important role in maintaining the motivation of production and continuity of product supply, it is suggested that broiler farms develop managerial and economic strategies including scheduling and mechanizing the process of supplying inputs and selling the product.

15.
Enterprise Development & Microfinance ; 33(1):12-27, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1841299

ABSTRACT

Livestock and grain market systems in Somalia's South West State, while vital to food security and household income, are affected by recurrent shocks, including insecurity, climate shocks, pests and livestock disease, desert locusts, and the COVID-19 pandemic. The fact that markets continue to function indicates a substantial degree of resilience. Findings from a mixed-method assessment across eight domains of system resilience indicate that the grain market system is more resilient than the livestock market system in three key domains: business strategy, diversity, and connectivity. Results show that grain businesses recover more quickly and are more likely to take action to achieve recovery than livestock businesses. When confronted by thin markets, practitioners have tended to respond by strengthening existing market actors, with the goal of filling critical gaps in the market. However, our findings provide new types of information to address systemic issues and strengthen market system resilience.

16.
FAPRI-MU Report - Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute, College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Missouri|2021. (06-21):unpaginated. ; 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1837871

ABSTRACT

The following text examines some impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on U.S. agricultural and agricultural product markets, producers, consumers, and related indicators. We outline reasons why reviewing events in isolation in 2020 might not give reliable estimates of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and might result in misleading expectations about a future pandemic. Next, we explore the effects of three key aspects of the shock in the United States: (1) lockdown impacts that reduced liquid fuel use dramatically, (2) disruptions in the livestock-meat sector supply chain, and (3) changes in overall economic activity, household income, and total expenditures. For these experiments, we use the FAPRI-MU stochastic model to simulate the impacts of a hypothetical future pandemic. This is not a study of the entire COVID-19 pandemic. The full impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic are large and complex. Factors include effects on health and mortality, a broader economic shock with its employment and income effects, lockdowns and reduced socializing, supply chain disruptions, policy responses, and similar shocks to other countries. The negative effects were experienced differently by each country. We focus only on the U.S. experience. We draw some conclusions from this and related work. * Market outcomes in 2020 were driven by factors other than the pandemic, such as a surge in crop exports and weather disruptions, so year-over-year changes alone are probably not good indicators of how the pandemic affected the sector. * Three of the largest direct impacts of COVID-19 on the agriculture sector were on fuel markets, meat supply chains, and consumer demand patterns. Demands for fuels fell by 5-10% after taking into account price and income effects. Margins between meat retail prices and livestock prices widened after considering other factors. * The loss of economic activity as measured by the falling U.S. GDP could have been expected to cause weaker demand for agricultural goods, lower prices, and sharply lower farm income than what was observed in 2020. * U.S. policy responses included payments that increased disposable income, boosted consumer demand, and mitigated the impacts on farm income from the drop in the size of the national economy. Greater payments directly to farmers also help explain why farm income rose in 2020 relative to 2019. * The impact of COVID-19 is partly a story of policy responses, including sector-specific actions targeting agriculture, fiscal policy, monetary policy, and lockdowns. A future pandemic might be set in a context that limits or disallows some of these options, or a setting that has - perhaps by design - new options. * A future pandemic's impacts would differ from recent experiences because of disease characteristics and also new individual, firm, and policy responses. If one assumes that a future pandemic is an exact repeat of the 2020 pandemic, then that implicitly requires that the disease is equally contagious and harmful, individuals and firms respond to a new pandemic the same as they did in 2020, and policy responses repeat the responses to COVID-19.

17.
FAPRI-MU Report - Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute, College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Missouri|2021. (08-21):unpaginated. ; 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1837130

ABSTRACT

In 2021 the markets for the commodities in this update have continued to be disrupted by COVID-19. All levels of the markets in many countries have been impacted from the supply of inputs, to processing capability and logistics. African Swine Fever (ASF), particularly in China, has disrupted meat markets. Volatility in these markets in the near term is to be expected and it is important to note that the path these markets take will be more volatile than what is projected here. Furthermore, the numbers presented in this report should not be interpreted as forecasts but as projections. They are estimates of the average values that would prevail under normal weather, current policy and macroeconomic parameters assumed herein. This update was prepared the weeks of August 23 and August 30, 2021 using data available at that time. Current policies are assumed to remain in place. The update uses data for international dairy and livestock from USDA's Production, Supply and Distribution database, with updates from the latest USDA's GAIN reports and other sources. Biofuels data comes primarily from F.O. Licht supplemented by GAIN reports and some country sources. The macroeconomy is assumed to evolve as forecast by IHS Markit in July 2021. Additionally no further assumptions have been made with regards to any other markets impacts associated with COVID-19.

18.
Agrarian Perspectives XXX. Sources of competitiveness under pandemic and environmental shocks. Proceedings of the 30th International Scientific Conference, Prague, Czech Republic ; 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1837007

ABSTRACT

These proceedings contain 31 articles on the bioeconomy during the COVID-19 pandemic, discussing topics in connection to: agricultural economics, trade, market competitiveness, agribusiness, prices, and consumer attitudes;tourism and ecotourism;milk production;wheat production;environmental protection in response to infrastructural and climate change;food production;agricultural policy;Twitter communications;and other related topics.

19.
Enterprise Development & Microfinance ; 32(1):4-18, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1834350

ABSTRACT

Somalia has a significant place in the livestock sector in the Horn of Africa;livestock trade and export is one of the key economic contributors. Most of the livestock trade happens with the Middle East, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia being one of its biggest importers. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to both massive loss of life and huge economic losses as the result of measures to contain the virus. In June 2020, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia took the decision to restrict the number of pilgrims for the annual Hajj. Impacts resulted in a decline in income from the seasonal Hajj of 80 per cent, though domestically prices of livestock remained stable and local markets were used for livestock sales. This paper, besides highlighting the effects, provides recommendations which could inform strategic planning, humanitarian aid, and resilience building for the livestock value chain in Somalia and the Horn of Africa.

20.
Revista Facultad Nacional de Agronomia Medellin ; 74(Suplemento):S13-S16, 2021.
Article in Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1824480

ABSTRACT

According to physics principles, any action produces a reaction and generates consequences. Under this premise, it is essential to reflect on the actions we have in our relationships with other animals in current times. Our actions always bring implications, in many cases, affecting the welfare of animals, humans, or the planet. A unique virus, COVID-19, caused a pandemic, with more than 50 million cases in 188 countries as of November 2020. Evidence indicates its spread was a consequence of the human relationship with wild animals used for marketing and consumption, generating radical changes in social and economic dynamics, and significantly impacting animals. The lockdowns slowed down daily life, forced stop using vehicles, and reduce our excessive consumption of things. In just a few months, nature has shown that fauna can return to places where it had not been present for decades, the water cleared, the air cleaned, and a kind of natural balance returned. During the forced human quarantine, the outlook for production animals showed the fragility and low resilience of high-density industrialized systems. The excess of animals in contrast to the low number of processing plants (large in size, and therefore fragile when facing a problem like this) resulted in the emergency slaughter of millions of animals on farms. In the case of companion animals, they have suffered collateral damage due to conscious or involuntary relinquishment due to cities' surprise closures;additionally, humans' constant presence at home has generated multiple behavioral problems. For animals in zoos, the situation is also difficult, as visitors' absence reduced incomes;it has put many zoos around the world at risk of closure. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on animal, environmental, and human welfare is clear. Hence, the objective is to analyze the impact of the pandemic on global welfare.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL