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1.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 38(2): 123-131, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096533

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine the psychological and social impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients with established anxiety disorders during a period of stringent mandated social restrictions. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 individuals attending the Galway-Roscommon Mental Health Services with an International Classification of Diseases diagnosis of an anxiety disorder to determine the impact of the COVID-19 restrictions on anxiety and mood symptoms, social and occupational functioning and quality of life. RESULTS: Twelve (40.0%) participants described COVID-19 restrictions as having a deleterious impact on their anxiety symptoms. Likert scale measurements noted that the greatest impact of COVID-19 related to social functioning (mean = 4.5, SD = 2.9), with a modest deleterious effect on anxiety symptoms noted (mean = 3.8, SD = 2.9). Clinician rated data noted that 8 (26.7%) participants had disimproved and 14 (46.7%) participants had improved since their previous clinical review, prior to commencement of COVID-19 restrictions. Conditions associated with no 'trigger', such as generalised anxiety disorder, demonstrated a non-significant increase in anxiety symptoms compared to conditions with a 'trigger', such as obsessive compulsive disorder. Psychiatric or physical comorbidity did not substantially impact on symptomatology secondary to COVID-19 mandated restrictions. CONCLUSIONS: The psychological and social impact of COVID-19 restrictions on individuals with pre-existing anxiety disorders has been modest with only minimal increases in symptomatology or social impairment noted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Humans , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Secondary Care
2.
PLoS ONE Vol 17(8), 2022, ArtID e0272215 ; 17(8), 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2083820

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and related containment measures are affecting mental health, especially among patients with pre-existing mental disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the first wave and its aftermath of the pandemic in Germany (March-July) on psychopathology of patients diagnosed with panic disorder, social anxiety disorder and specific phobia who were on the waiting list or in current treatment at a German university-based outpatient clinic. From 108 patients contacted, forty-nine patients (45.37%) completed a retrospective survey on COVID-19 related stressors, depression, and changes in anxiety symptoms. Patients in the final sample (n = 47) reported a mild depression and significant increase in unspecific anxiety (d = .41), panic symptoms (d = .85) and specific phobia (d = .38), while social anxiety remained unaltered. Pandemic related stressors like job insecurities, familial stress and working in the health sector were significantly associated with more severe depression and increases in anxiety symptoms. High pre-pandemic symptom severity (anxiety/depression) was a risk factor, whereas meaningful work and being divorced/separated were protective factors (explained variance: 46.5% of changes in anxiety and 75.8% in depressive symptoms). In line with diathesis-stress models, patients show a positive association between stressors and symptom load. Health care systems are requested to address the needs of this vulnerable risk group by implementing timely and low-threshold interventions to prevent patients from further deterioration. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

3.
Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung ; 23(3), 2022.
Article in German | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2081141

ABSTRACT

Our aim in this article is to methodologically reflect on different qualitative forms of face-to-face, telephone, and video interviews for research with vulnerable groups. We address the key question of how people with anxiety disorders can be involved in qualitative research projects and what advantages and challenges are associated with the different (analogue and digital) forms of data collection. The basis for the comparison is formed by 12 semi-structured interviews (KRUSE, 2015), which were carried out in different modes as part of the research project "Mobility Without Fear" during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our comparison of the qualitative instruments is carried out with regard to planning interviews, interview practice, distortions, and validity and in terms of depth of content (from superficial to profound) and time and documentation efforts. Advantages and challenges are presented for both the interviewees and the interviewers. Moreover, we describe research-ethical considerations, which are to be taken in the course of interview planning, recruiting, and communicating, in order to protect vulnerable target groups, and we give specific recommendations for conducting qualitative interviews with people affected by anxiety disorders. © 2022 Gerit Götzenbrucker, Michaela Griesbeck, Kai Preibisch.

4.
IEEE Sensors Journal ; : 1-1, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2078239

ABSTRACT

The emergence of COVID-19 has drastically altered the lifestyle of people around the world, resulting in significant consequences in people’s physical and mental wellbeing. Fear of COVID-19, prolonged isolation, quarantine, and the pandemic itself have contributed to a rise in hypertension amongst the general populace globally. Protracted exposure to stress has been linked with the onset of numerous diseases and even increased frequency in suicides. Stress monitoring is a critical component of any strategy used to intervene in case of stress. However, constant monitoring during activities of daily living using clinical means is not viable. During the current pandemic, isolation protocols, quarantines and overloaded hospitals have made it physically challenging for subjects to be monitored in clinical settings. This study presents a proposal for a framework that uses unobtrusive wearable sensors, securely connected to an AI-driven cloud-based server for early detection of hypertension and an intervention facilitation system. More precisely, the proposed framework identifies the types of wearable sensors that can be utilized ubiquitously, the enabling technologies required to achieve energy efficiency and secure communication in wearable sensors and finally, the proposed use of a combination of machine learning classifiers on a cloud-based server to detect instances of sustained stress and all associated risks during times of a communicable disease epidemic like COVID-19. IEEE

5.
Ieee Access ; 10:103176-103186, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070270

ABSTRACT

In large MOOC cohorts, the sheer variance and volume of discussion forum posts can make it difficult for instructors to distinguish nuanced emotion in students, such as engagement levels or stress, purely from textual data. Sentiment analysis has been used to build student behavioral models to understand emotion, however, more recent research suggests that separating sentiment and stress into different measures could improve approaches. Detecting stress in a MOOC corpus is challenging as students may use language that does not conform to standard definitions, but new techniques like TensiStrength provide more nuanced measures of stress by considering it as a spectrum. In this work, we introduce an ensemble method that extracts feature categories of engagement, semantics and sentiment from an AdelaideX student dataset. Stacked and voting methods are used to compare performance measures on how accurately these features can predict student grades. The stacked method performed best across all measures, with our Random Forest baseline further demonstrating that negative sentiment and stress had little impact on academic results. As a secondary analysis, we explored whether stress among student posts increased in 2020 compared to 2019 due to COVID-19, but found no significant change. Importantly, our model indicates that there may be a relationship between features, which warrants future research.

6.
Sustainability ; 14(19):12866, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066472

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has caused widespread psychological suffering. Anxiety is one of the several psychological disorders that are escalating globally, yet social distance constraints restrict in-person mental health therapy. Anxiety and other psychological disorders whose treatments are limited due to social distancing continue to grow, so there is an increasing need to use mental healthcare that can be offered remotely, especially in the pandemic era. This study aimed to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the efficacy of online-based interventions for anxiety during COVID-19. This study followed the Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis (PRISMA). We collected data from three databases, namely PubMed, CINAHL, and Oxford Library Press, published in 2020–2022. Additionally, we collected data using the snowball technique. This meta-analysis analyzed the pooled mean difference (MD) and its p-value using random-effects models. Critical appraisal and risk of bias were assessed using Cochrane Risk of Bias (Rob) 2. We retrieved 34 RCTs for systematic review and 14 RCTs for meta-analysis, yielding 9159 participants for general anxiety disorder (GAD-7) measurement and 1303 participants for depression anxiety stress scale (DASS-21) measurement. This study shows that online-based interventions significantly reduce GAD-7 score (a pooled MD of 1.30;95% CI: 2.83–4.65;p = 0.00001) and insignificantly reduce DASS-21 (0.05;95% CI: −2.63–2.72;p = 0.97) according to pre- and post-test in intervention group. Additionally, there is a significant difference between the intervention and control groups, where the intervention group performed statistically progressively better than the controls (−7.26;95% CI: −11.58–−2.95;p = 0.001) (−2.08;95% CI: −6.71–2.55;p = 0.001). Online-based interventions have proved effective for reducing general anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic. Consequently, this meta-analysis can be adapted as a model for mental health services in the new normal.

7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065960

ABSTRACT

The effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on maternal mental health has been described in Canada and China but no study has compared the two countries using the same standardized and validated instruments. In this study, we aimed to evaluate and compare the impact of COVID-19 public health policies on maternal mental health between Canada and China, as we hypothesize that geographical factors and different COVID-19 policies are likely to influence maternal mental health. Pregnant persons >18 years old were recruited in Canada and China using a web-based strategy. All participants recruited between 26 June 2020 and 16 February 2021 were analyzed. Self-reported data included sociodemographic variables, COVID-19 experience and maternal mental health assessments (Edinburgh Perinatal Depression Scale (EPDS), Generalized Anxiety Disorders (GAD-7) scale, stress and satisfaction with life). Analyses were stratified by recruitment cohort, namely: Canada 1 (26 June 2020-10 October 2020), Canada 2 and China (11 October 2020-16 February 2021). Overall, 2423 participants were recruited, with 1804 participants within Canada 1, 135 within Canada 2 and 484 in China. The mean EDPS scores were 8.1 (SD, 5.1) in Canada 1, 8.1 (SD, 5.2) in Canada 2 and 7.7 (SD, 4.9) in China (p-value Canada 2/China: p = 0.005). The mean GAD-7 scores were 2.6 (SD, 2.9) in China, 4.3 (SD, 3.8) in Canada 1 (p < 0.001) and 5.8 (SD, 5.2) in Canada 2 (p < 0.001). When adjusting for stress and anxiety, being part of the Chinese cohort significantly increased the chances of having maternal depression by over threefold (adjusted OR 3.20, 95%CI 1.77-5.78). Canadian and Chinese participants reported depressive scores nearly double those of other crises and non-pandemic periods. Lockdowns and reopening periods have an important impact on levels of depression and anxiety among pregnant persons.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
8.
BJPsych Open ; 8(6): e181, 2022 Oct 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064879

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A rise in mental illness is expected to follow the COVID-19 pandemic, which has also been projected to lead to a deep global economic recession, further adding to risk factors. AIMS: The aim of this review was to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and previous pandemics, epidemics and economic crises on mental health. METHOD: Searches were conducted in PubMed, Web of Science, PsycINFO and Sociological Abstracts. We included studies of all populations exposed to the COVID-19 pandemic, and other similar pandemics/epidemics and economic crises, compared with non-exposed time periods or regions. The outcome was mental health. RESULTS: The 174 included studies assessed mental health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic (87 studies), 2008 economic crisis (84 studies) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic (three studies). Outcomes were divided into affective disorders, suicides, mental healthcare utilisation and other mental health. COVID-19 pandemic studies were of lesser quality than those for the economic crisis or SARS epidemic. Most studies for all exposures showed increases in affective disorders and other mental health problems. For economic crisis exposure, increases in mental healthcare utilisation and suicides were also found, but these findings were mixed for COVID-19 pandemic exposure. This is probably because of quarantine measures affecting help-seeking and shorter follow-ups of studies of COVID-19 pandemic exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the importance of available, accessible and sustainable mental health services. Also, socioeconomically disadvantaged populations should be particular targets of policy interventions during the COVID-19 pandemic.

9.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e063687, 2022 09 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064168

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Assessing mental health literacy has implications for the identification and treatment of mental health problems. Adolescents have been identified as a particularly important target group for initiating and improving mental health literacy. However, much of what we know about adolescent mental health literacy comes from high-income countries. This proposed review seeks to synthesise the available published primary evidence from sub-Saharan Africa on the status and measurement of mental health literacy among school-going adolescents. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will perform a systematic review reported in line with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement (PRISMA-2020). We will systematically search selected global databases (EMBASE, PsycINFO, PubMed and MEDLINE) and regional electronic databases (African Index Medicus and African Journals OnLine) up to December 2021 for observational and qualitative studies published in English and French. The standard quality assessment criteria for evaluating primary research papers from a variety of fields (QualSyst criteria) will be used to appraise the methodological quality of the included studies. The Petticrew-Roberts 3-step approach to narrative synthesis will be applied to the included studies. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: We will not seek ethical approval from an institutional review board, as this is a systematic review of available and accessible literature. When completed, the full report of this review will be submitted to a journal for peer-reviewed publication; the key findings will be presented at local and international conferences with-partial or full-focus on (adolescent) mental health (literacy). PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021229011.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Mental Health , Adolescent , Africa South of the Sahara , Humans , Qualitative Research , Research Design , Schools , Systematic Reviews as Topic
10.
Clin Oral Investig ; 2022 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2059873

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Assess the prevalence of self-reported TMD symptoms and anxiety and check the quality of sleep and life during the distance learning period in university students at the University of Brasilia (UnB). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The participants were students from the Health Sciences College and Medicine College at UnB. Self-administered questionnaires were used to evaluate symptoms of TMD, quality of life, and sleep quality. One-way analysis of variance, followed by Bonferroni test, and Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by Dunn's test, were performed (P < 0.05). For qualitative data analysis, the chi-square test was applied (P < 0.05). RESULTS: Total 156 students were included; prevalence of TMD, anxiety, sleep disturbance, and poor sleep quality was 73.1%, 84%, 12.8%, and 62.8%, respectively. A greater prevalence of painful TMD was observed in students with severe anxiety (P = 0.007). Students with symptoms of painful TMD, severe anxiety, and sleep disorders had statistically worse quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of distance learning in health courses to replace classroom teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted TMD prevalence, anxiety, quality of life, and sleep quality. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Psychological factors are directly associated with TMD symptoms and quality of life, TMD conditions are related to quality of life as well. COVID-19 pandemic and the distance learning in health courses are new situations that can lead to a great impact on mental health and in consequence to TMD conditions and quality of life.

11.
Forum : Qualitative Social Research ; 23(3), 2022.
Article in German | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2056593

ABSTRACT

Ziel dieses Beitrags ist, unterschiedliche qualitative Erhebungsformen (Präsenz-, Telefon- und Videotelefonie-Interviews) für die Forschung mit vulnerablen Gruppen methodologisch zu reflektieren. Im Beitrag adressieren wir die Leitfrage, wie sich Personen, die von starker Angst oder Angsterkrankungen betroffen sind, in qualitative Forschungsprojekte einbinden lassen und welche Vorteile und Herausforderungen mit den unterschiedlichen (analogen und digitalen) Erhebungsformen verbunden sind. Die Basis dafür bilden 12 qualitative Leitfadeninterviews (KRUSE 2015), die im Rahmen des Forschungsprojektes "Angstfrei mobil" während der Covid-19-Pandemie in den unterschiedlichen Modi durchgeführt wurden. Der Vergleich der Erhebungsformen erfolgt in Hinblick auf Vorabsprache, Gesprächsführung, Verzerrungen und Validität sowie Darstellungstiefe und Zeit- und Dokumentationsaufwand. Die jeweiligen Vorteile und Herausforderungen werden sowohl für die interviewten als auch für die interviewenden Personen dargestellt. Wir beschreiben darüber hinaus, welche forschungsethischen Maßnahmen bei Interviewplanung, Rekrutierung und Kommunikation zum Schutz vulnerabler Zielgruppen zu treffen sind und geben konkrete Empfehlungen für die Durchführung von qualitativen Interviews mit Menschen, die von Angsterkrankungen betroffen sind.Alternate :Our aim in this article is to methodologically reflect on different qualitative forms of face-to-face, telephone, and video interviews for research with vulnerable groups. We address the key question of how people with anxiety disorders can be involved in qualitative research projects and what advantages and challenges are associated with the different (analogue and digital) forms of data collection. The basis for the comparison is formed by 12 semi-structured interviews (KRUSE, 2015), which were carried out in different modes as part of the research project "Mobility Without Fear" during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our comparison of the qualitative instruments is carried out with regard to planning interviews, interview practice, distortions, and validity and in terms of depth of content (from superficial to profound) and time and documentation efforts. Advantages and challenges are presented for both the interviewees and the interviewers. Moreover, we describe research-ethical considerations, which are to be taken in the course of interview planning, recruiting, and communicating, in order to protect vulnerable target groups, and we give specific recommendations for conducting qualitative interviews with people affected by anxiety disorders.

12.
BJPsych Open ; 8(5): e171, 2022 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054010

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: Fear and uncertainty have worsened mental health outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 testing is essential yet underutilised, and many people may experience difficulties accessing testing if the US federal government fails to sustain the testing capacity. To date, limited evidence exists about the role of COVID-19 testing in mental health. We examined the associations of COVID-19 testing uptake with certain mental disorders, through a nationally representative cohort of adults in US post-secondary education (N = 65 360). Adults with test-confirmed COVID-19 were at significantly lower risk than those with unconfirmed COVID-19 for severe depression, severe anxiety, eating disorders, and suicidal ideation. Findings suggest another potential benefit of public health efforts to encourage COVID-19 testing, namely promoting mental health.

13.
International Perspectives in Psychology: Research, Practice, Consultation ; : No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2050269

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to validate the Type III continuous traumatic stress model assumptions and use it to assess the effect of intersected traumas of civil war and COVID-19 stressors on internally displaced Syrian people. We recruited 891 Syrians from camps (46.5% females, aged 18-90 years [M = 30.81, SD = 12.04]). We measured COVID-19 stressors, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), complex PTSD (CPTSD), depression, anxiety, and executive functions to assess the variables related to peri-post Type III mental health syndrome. We measured Type I, II, and III traumas and Type III trauma subtypes. To explore the significance of differences between correlation sizes and the comparative severity of each trauma type, we calculated Fisher z scores. We performed path analysis with trauma Types III and II as correlated independent variables and COVID-19 stressors' impact on peri-post Type III trauma mental health syndrome to check their proliferation and impact. Of the sample, COVID-19 had infected 45.9%, 33.1% fit the diagnostic criteria for CPTSD, and 13.9% fit the diagnostic criteria for PTSD. All trauma types were associated with mental health, cognitive deficits, and COVID-19 severity, with a significantly higher association with trauma Type III. Type III-a subtype (intersected discrimination) had the highest associations with each variable. Type III was bidirectionally correlated with Type II and proliferated to Type I traumas (single past events) and COVID-19 stressors, with Type III having a larger effect size on peri-post Type III trauma mental health syndrome. The clinical and conceptual implications of the findings are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved) Impact Statement This study helps understand the intersection between intergroup conflicts and intersected discrimination with COVID-19 pandemic stressors that amplifies its impact on mental health and cognitive functioning in Syrian internally displaced people. This study addresses the United Nations sustainable development goals of empowering and promoting the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic, or other status by unpacking some of the powerful mechanisms behind intergroup conflicts and intersected discrimination interfaced with COVID-19. This study validates the continuous stress Type III trauma framework and proposes corrective and treatment strategies that address inequalities and discrimination and their impact. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

14.
Drug Safety ; 45(10):1250, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2045179

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Pfizer/BioNTech (BNT162b2) and Oxford/AstraZeneca (chAdOx1-S) COVID-19 vaccines were approved for emergency use. Clinical trials of both vaccines reported no safety concerns other than a few local and systemic reactions that resolved in few days for both vaccines. Cutaneous reactions to COVID-19 vaccination are generally minor and self-limited. The most common cutaneous reaction reported was a local injection-site reaction. Objective: Here we present 3 cases of erythema multiform following COVID-19 vaccination with positive rechallenge in 2 cases. Methods: Not applicable. Results: Case 1: A 51 year old woman with no past medical history presented with a macular, erythematous, round-shaped itchy rash on the hands, knees and soles. She denied having a neither recent illness nor sick contact. However, she received the first dose of the mRNA Pfizer/BioNTech (BNT162b2), 3 days earlier. Lesions disappeared in 7 days with local corticosteroid treatment. One month later and two days after receiving the second shot of the same vaccine, lesions reappeared and extended to upper members. Skin biopsy was compatible with erythema polymorph. Case 2: A 55 year old man with a past medical history of hypertension, presented 6 days following the 2nd shot of the mRNA Pfizer/ BioNTech (BNT162b2), vesicular eruptions on the upper and lower members. The outcome was favorable within 2 weeks under local corticosteroid. The patient reported that he had the same skin lesions in ankles and soles few days following the 1st shot of the same vaccine. Histological findings revealed an erythema polymorph. Case 3: A 57 year old woman with a medical history of hypertension and anxiety disorder presented with a worsening rash and fever for 6 days. The patient reported that she experienced fever, polyarthralgia and that she had received the second shot of Oxford/AstraZeneca (chAdOx1-S), the day before these symptoms appeared. On the physical examination, she had targetoid skin lesions over the trunk, on the ear, upper and lower members. Otherwise she had oral and genital mucosal ulcerations. A thoracic CT scan was performed because of the persistent fever and showed multiple enlarged lymph nodes, a layer of pericardial and plural effusion. A favorable outcome was observed in 3 weeks. Conclusion: Erythema multiform remains an exceptional COVID 19 vaccine adverse effect. Health care workers must be aware of this potential adverse effect or its recurrence and advise patients accordingly. Benefits of receiving a COVID 19 vaccine remains more important.

15.
Frontiers in Education ; 7, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2043433

ABSTRACT

IntroductionThe COVID-19 pandemic brought on higher-than-normal levels of anxiety and depression, especially among graduate students whose academic trajectory was disrupted. However, not all graduate students were affected and therefore, it is important to identify potential protective factors. MethodWe recruited 61 graduate students whose research was directly impacted by the pandemic and examined their change in academic stressors since the onset of the pandemic. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to evaluate how perceived academic stressors brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic impacted anxiety, depression, and heart rate variability (HRV), and whether physical activity and trait resiliency independently buffered against the effects of stress. ResultsGraduate students who reported greater changes in academic stressors since the onset for the pandemic were more anxious and depressed. Moderate-intensity physical activity explained significant variance in anxiety whereas resiliency explained significant variance in both anxiety and depression. HRV was higher in males than females, aligning with sex differences in vulnerability to stress and mental illness. ConclusionOverall, the results suggest that resiliency and physical activity may offer unique protection against symptoms of anxiety and depression in graduate students experiencing increased academic stress during COVID-19. Institutions of higher education should consider investing in programs that encourage physical activity and promote resiliency by teaching mindfulness, stress management, and cognitive behavioral approaches.

16.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e063469, 2022 09 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038314

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Contributing factors to COVID-19 vaccination intention in low-income and middle-income countries have received little attention. This study examined COVID-19-related anxiety and obsessive thoughts and situational factors associated with Pakistani postpartum women's intention to get COVID-19 vaccination. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study administering a survey by a telephone interview format between 15 July and 10 September 2020. SETTING: Four centres of Aga Khan Hospital for Women and Children-Garden, Kharadar, Karimabad and Hyderabad-in Sindh Province, Pakistan. PARTICIPANTS: Women who were enrolled in our longitudinal Pakistani cohort study were approached (n=1395), and 990 women (71%) participated in the survey, of which 941 women who were in their postpartum period were included in the final analysis. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURE AND FACTORS: COVID-19 vaccine intention, sociodemographic and COVID-19-related factors, Coronavirus anxiety, obsession with COVID-19 and work and social adjustment were assessed. Multiple multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with women's intentions. RESULTS: Most women would accept a COVID-19 vaccine for themselves (66.7%). Only 24.4% of women were undecided about vaccination against COVID-19, and a small number of women rejected the COVID-19 vaccine (8.8%). Women with primary education were less likely to take a COVID-19 vaccine willingly than those with higher education. COVID-19 vaccine uncertainty and refusal were predicted by having no experience of COVID-19 infection, childbirth during the pandemic, having no symptoms of Coronavirus anxiety and obsession with COVID-19. Predictors for women's intention to vaccinate themselves and their children against COVID-19 were similar. CONCLUSION: Understanding the factors shaping women's intention to vaccinate themselves or their children would enable evidence-based strategies by healthcare providers to enhance the uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine and achieve herd immunity against Coronavirus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Intention , Pakistan/epidemiology , Postpartum Period , Vaccination/psychology
17.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e067393, 2022 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029508

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment for obesity, and is performed yearly in over 8000 patients in Canada. Over 50% of those who live with obesity also have a history of mental health disorder. The COVID-19 pandemic has made it difficult for people living with obesity to manage their weight even after undergoing bariatric surgery, which combined with pandemic-related increases in mental health distress, has the potential to adversely impact obesity outcomes such as weight loss and quality of life. Reviews of virtual mental health interventions during COVID-19 have not identified any interventions that specifically address psychological distress or disordered eating in patients with obesity, including those who have had bariatric surgery. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A randomised controlled trial will be conducted with 140 patients across four Ontario Bariatric Centres of Excellence to examine the efficacy of a telephone-based cognitive behavioural therapy intervention versus a control intervention (online COVID-19 self-help resources) in postoperative bariatric patients experiencing disordered eating and/or psychological distress. Patients will be randomised 1:1 to either group. Changes in the Binge Eating Scale and the Patient Health Questionnaire 9-Item Scale will be examined between groups across time (primary outcomes). Qualitative exit interviews will be conducted, and data will be used to inform future adaptations of the intervention to meet patients' diverse needs during and post-pandemic. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has received ethics approvals from the following: Clinical Trials Ontario (3957) and the University Health Network Research Ethics Committee (22-5145), the Board of Record. All participants will provide written informed consent prior to enrolling in the study. Results will be made available to patients with bariatric surgery, the funders, the supporting organisations and other researchers via publication in peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT05258578.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , COVID-19 , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Bariatric Surgery/psychology , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Humans , Mental Health , Obesity/surgery , Ontario/epidemiology , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Telephone
18.
J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol ; 38(Suppl 1): S34-S45, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2024787

ABSTRACT

Background and Aims: Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected postgraduate medical education, training, and ongoing research work across specialties. Our survey aimed to analyze the effect of COVID-19 on challenges in pursuing research and academics and ascertain the stressors on residents across medical specialties. Material and Methods: The questionnaire was validated by 10 experts and following ethical approval, this google form-based survey was circulated to postgraduates across specialties across the country through social media platforms over 1 month (22 August 2020 to 21 September 2020). On clicking the link, the participants received brief information regarding the survey followed by the questionnaire. Weekly reminders were sent to the nonresponders till the desired sample size was attained, after which the survey was closed, and responses were analyzed. Results: Four hundred and nineteen of 900 residents completed the survey (46.6% response rate). Majority (88.8%) admitted that the inability to conduct the thesis and break in academics caused a significant amount of mental stress upon them. Though classes had resumed through online platforms for most residents (75.4%), the residents reported that lack of bedside learning (65.4%), inadequate progress tests (26.4%), and delay in thesis topic allotment (84.6% among those not allotted thesis) correlated with increased stress. Fear of extension of the course (53%; P = 0.019) and getting infected with COVID-19 (46.6%; P = 0.019) were most cited reasons for significant stress in most of the residents. Many residents (26%) were unable to sleep properly and 22.1% were unable to concentrate on academics. Majority believed that extension of the submission deadline, reduction in sample size, and change in topic would help to complete thesis. Conclusion: The present survey revealed that there is a major impediment to research and academics of medical postgraduates during COVID-19 pandemic which has markedly increased their stress levels.

19.
Meditsinskiy Sovet ; 2022(11):54-60, 2022.
Article in Russian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2026182

ABSTRACT

Due to the processes of globalization and transition to the information society their negative effects started to become apparent, namely virtually unlimited access to an abundance of information. Information overload occurs when the amount of information exceeds the perceptual abilities of accepting human being. It questions the impact of this process on health and sleep. Such phenomena as mind scrolling, communicative overload, distrust of digital security, cyber violence, digital inequality as mediators or consequences of information overload are considered. This article reviews the types of the information overload, ways of dis-seminating information, mechanisms of influence on the self-rated health and psychological condition and sleep, connections with anxiety and depression. This subject became especially relevant in the context of COVID-19 pandemic, since isolation, restriction of motor activity, and increased time spent behind the screen have become important predictors not only of sleep disorders, but also of other health problems. The article addresses the issue of subjects of studies are usually teenagers and people under 35 (generation Z), as the most active smartphones, messengers, social networks and mass media users. The problem of providing unfair information to users of social networks of different regions of residence, socio-economic levels is raised. Most scientists agree that the ways to solve the described problems are to limit the time behind the screen, the amount of content consumed per day, and compliance with sleep hygiene. Additional studies are required to determine the exact pathophysiological mechanisms of the effect of stress on sleep. © 2022, Meditsinskiy Sovet. All rights reserved.

20.
BJPsych Open ; 8(5): e162, 2022 Aug 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021388

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mental health was only modestly affected in adults during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic on the group level, but interpersonal variation was large. AIMS: We aim to investigate potential predictors of the differences in changes in mental health. METHOD: Data were aggregated from three Dutch ongoing prospective cohorts with similar methodology for data collection. We included participants with pre-pandemic data gathered during 2006-2016, and who completed online questionnaires at least once during lockdown in The Netherlands between 1 April and 15 May 2020. Sociodemographic, clinical (number of mental health disorders and personality factors) and COVID-19-related variables were analysed as predictors of relative changes in four mental health outcomes (depressive symptoms, anxiety and worry symptoms, and loneliness), using multivariate linear regression analyses. RESULTS: We included 1517 participants with (n = 1181) and without (n = 336) mental health disorders. Mean age was 56.1 years (s.d. 13.2), and 64.3% were women. Higher neuroticism predicted increases in all four mental health outcomes, especially for worry (ß = 0.172, P = 0.003). Living alone and female gender predicted increases in depressive symptoms and loneliness (ß = 0.05-0.08), whereas quarantine and strict adherence with COVID-19 restrictions predicted increases in anxiety and worry symptoms (ß = 0.07-0.11).Teleworking predicted a decrease in anxiety symptoms (ß = -0.07) and higher age predicted a decrease in anxiety (ß = -0.08) and worry symptoms (ß = -0.10). CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed neuroticism as a robust predictor of adverse changes in mental health, and identified additional sociodemographic and COVID-19-related predictors that explain longitudinal variability in mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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