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1.
Australasian Journal of Dermatology ; 63(SUPPL 1):43, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1883175

ABSTRACT

The Pacific Dermatology Training Center began its life on February 8th 2019 when it was officially opened by the Hon Minister for Health in Fiji- Hon Ifereimi Waqainabete in Tamavua, Suva, Fiji. This marked a new beginning for Dermatology Services in Fiji-it now has a Training arm that will strengthen Dermatology Services in Fiji and the South Pacific. Following the opening, four young medical officers enrolled through Fiji National University to become the first cohort of the Postgraduate Diploma in Dermatology Programme. While the major disciplines (Internal Medicine, Surgery, Paediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynaecology) have had their postgraduate programme to Masters Level for more than 20 years with the then Fiji School of Medicine, dermatology like many subspecialities was not included. The first dermatology trainees were from Kiribati, Samoa and two from Fiji. The 2019 academic year, although challenging, had four trainees successfully complete the programme through the FNU accredited and supervised programme. Three trainees enrolled in 2020-two Fijians and one from Papua New Guinea, The Covid19 pandemic caused the teaching and assessment to be converted to on-line, in conjunction with clinic participation and supervision. The Fijian trainees were diverted for Covid 19 response. Our PNG student returned home after the first semester, with online teaching and assessment continuing from Fiji and Australia, and the trainee passed the examinations in February 2021. The center continues to survive and three trainees enrolled in 2021 including two Fijian and one Solomon Islander doctors. 2022 will see commencement of the Masters In Medicine (Dermatology) programme and continuation of the Diploma, with 4 students already registering interest. Online teaching will be supplemented by local clinic supervision. The presentation therefore highlights this journey and the players involved behind the scene.

2.
Australasian Journal of Dermatology ; 63(SUPPL 1):47, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1883169

ABSTRACT

Background: The teaching of dermatology in medical schools is variable, and in many cases, minimal1. Postgraduate teaching of dermatology is similar, despite skin diseases comprising 15% of the work of GPs in Australia2. Aim and method: At the Skin Health Institute, we created a free, open-access podcast series on skin disease and dermatology, called Spot Diagnosis, aimed at educating medical students and GPs/GP trainees. Results: Spot Diagnosis was launched in March 2020, just as the COVID-19 pandemic hit Australia. Despite this, Spot Diagnosis has been very successful. To date, Spot Diagnosis: 1. Has had more than 10000 downloads in 64 different countries 2. Has made it onto the resource lists of multiple medical schools 3. Has been approved for RACGP and ACRRM CPD points 4. Has been profiled in the mainstream and medical media 5. Is still going strong after two seasons and twenty episodes. Discussion: I would like to explore the rationale behind creating the podcast, especially looking at how we decided on the format, topics, and guests. I would like to discuss the practical aspects of recording and editing a podcast, particularly during the pandemic and how we marketed Spot Diagnosis using social media. Finally, I would like to highlight how we, as dermatology educators, engaged successfully with the brave new world of FOAMed (Free-online medical education).

3.
SSM Qual Res Health ; 2: 100110, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1882528

ABSTRACT

From the adoption of mask-wearing in public settings to the omnipresence of hand-sanitising, the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has brought unprecedented cultural attention to infection prevention and control (IPC) in everyday life. At the same time, the pandemic threat has enlivened and unsettled hospital IPC processes, fracturing confidence, demanding new forms of evidence, and ultimately involving a rapid reassembling of what constitutes safe care. Here, drawing on semi-structured interviews with 63 frontline healthcare workers from two states in Australia, interviewed between September 2020 and March 2021, we illuminate some of the affective dimensions of IPC at a time of rapid change and evolving uncertainty. We track how a collective sense of risk and safety is relationally produced, redefining attitudes and practices around infective risk, and transforming accepted paradigms of care and self-protection. Drawing on Puig de la Bellacasa's formulation, we propose the notion of IPC as a multidimensional matter of care. Highlighting the complex negotiation of space and time in relation to infection control and care illustrates a series of paradoxes, the understanding of which helps illuminate not only how IPC works, in practice, but also what it means to those working on the frontline of the pandemic.

4.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 30(1 SUPPL):249, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1880130

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 infection-associated cognitive and olfaction impairments have an unclear pathogenesis, possibly related to systemic disease severity, hypoxia, or illness-associated anxiety and depression. A biomarker for these neurocognitive changes is lacking. The kynurenine pathway (KP) is an interferon stimulated myeloid cell mediated tryptophan degradation pathway important in immune tolerance, neurotoxicity and vascular injury, that is dysregulated in COVID-19. We hypothesized that neurocognitive impairments were associated with an activated KP. Methods: The current analysis includes COVID-19 patients as part of the ADAPT study, a prospective cohort (St Vincent's Hospital Sydney, Australia). Disease severity was assessed with 18 acute symptoms and hospitalization status. Blood samples were taken 2 months (N=136) and 4 months (N=121) post diagnosis along with cognitive (Cogstate Computerized Battery, CBB;NIH toolbox Odor Identification Test, OIT) and mental health screenings (DMI-10;IESR, SPHERE-34 Psychological subscale grouped into a composite score). KP metabolites (PIC, QUIN, 3HK, 3HAA, AA, KYN, TRP, log for analyses except for TRP) were measured by GC-MS and uHPLC. The CBB and OIT data were demographically-corrected. CBB follow-up data was also corrected for practice effect. Linear mixed effect regression models with time effect (days post diagnosis) tested whether cognition, and olfaction were associated the KP (main and time interaction);while correcting for disease severity, mental health and comorbidities. Results: 136 patients: mean age=46±15;40% females;90% English speaking background;disease severity: 40% mild, 50% moderate, 10% severe/hospitalised;34% treated comorbidities. At 2 months post diagnosis, 16% had cognitive impairment, and 25% had impaired olfaction. Cognitive impairment was more common in those with anosmia (p=.05). At 4 months, 23% had cognition impairment and 20% had impaired olfaction. QUIN (p=.001), 3HAA (p<.0001) increased over the study period, while TRP decreased (p=.02). QUIN level associated with poorer cognitive scores (p=.0007;QUIN (nM) between 800-1000 was most predictive). There was no time∗QUIN interaction. QUIN association to cognition persisted when severe cases were excluded (p<.005). Conclusion: COVID-19 is associated with KP activation, and the latter with cognitive impairment. QUIN was the only biomarker associated with cognitive impairment, and may be useful in monitoring and elucidating COVID-19 neuropathogenesis and treatment.

5.
Journal of International Students ; 12(2):403-421, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1879811

ABSTRACT

Second language (L2) international students are frequently blamed for miscommunication and even stigmatized and marginalized due to the way they sound. However, little is known about how their accent contributes to the L2 lived experience at foreign universities. Taking a mixed methods phenomenological approach, survey (N = 306) and semi-structured interviews with participants from East Asian countries (N = 5), this study reveals that their personal journey as foreign-accented speakers can be traced through a four-stage process: (a) surprise, (b) anticlimax, (c) learning to survive, and (d) feeling empowered. The first two themes are a period wherein participants experience high levels of stress and anxiety because of having to fit into new learning environments. The last two themes refer to a stage where they developed the ability to survive with increasing self-confidence. Practical implications for improving the campus climate for all L2 students are discussed.

6.
The Rural Educator ; 43(2):0_1,47-59, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1877442

ABSTRACT

According to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), by the end of March 2020 more than 1.5 billion pupils or 87% of the worlds student population across 165 countries had been affected by school closures caused by COVID-19 (Sacks et al., 2021, as cited in UNESCO, 2020). Soon after the call for school closures, U.S. educational leaders faced numerous challenges, including parents with questions about remote and online learning opportunities;effects of school closures on student attendance requirements, assessment practices and student report cards;and graduation requirements for seniors in high school (Barrington, 2020). [...]COVID-19 resulted in a different form of school-led remote learning with challenges, such as reduced one-to-one engagement with teachers;difficulty in student engagement;less ability to monitor individual student progress;increased oversight required from parents and caregivers, particularly for younger children;increased social isolation and reduced ability to support student well-being;interruption to learning support for those children with additional needs;and different levels of access to technology, including internet and devices that support learning (Sahlberg, 2020). In the International Rural School Leadership Project, the authors of this paper collaborated to facilitate ZOOM forums for two panels of rural school principals to share early experiences in the pandemic with colleagues in each other's country.

7.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-337960

ABSTRACT

The UK Supreme Court’s decision in The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) v Arch and Others is of considerable significance. It is arguably the leading authority, not just in the UK but elsewhere in the common law world, on the response of business interruption insurance (BII) policies to claims arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. This article explains the nature of BII policies and the law in England & Wales prior to the decision in FCA v Arch. It then examines the Supreme Court’s decision in detail before reflecting on its wider implications for policyholders, insurers and others.

8.
Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology ; : 1-20, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1873739

ABSTRACT

In the two decades of economic recovery in post-Independence Timor-Leste (2002–2022), there has been a growing interest and commitment, especially among young people, to pursue temporary and circular labour migration. In this paper I draw on a survey of returned Fataluku-speaking labour migrants who have spent varying periods of time working in the UK (Britain) and reflect on their experiences and the benefits or otherwise that have resulted from these efforts. The survey was undertaken in late 2019, just before the onset of the global Covid-19 pandemic. The subsequent lockdown and border closures marked the effective end of this remarkable, two-decade long, informal Timorese circular labour migration to the UK. A post-Covid landscape may yet see a lively resumption of this livelihood pathway, but it will do so in the uncertain terrain of a post-Brexit landscape in the UK and the prospects of new labour migration options available closer to home in Australia under the Seasonal Workers Program and Pacific Labour Schemes (PLS). [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

9.
International Journal of Caring Sciences ; 15(1):680-693, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871896

ABSTRACT

Background: The high contagiousness of the SARS-CoV-2, the large proportion of the population at risk of serious illness which will require hospital care and, certainly, the necessary need to protect public health has led countries worldwide to quickly resolve measures. Aims: Public health policies regarding the COVID-19 pandemic management of Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Finland and Iceland. Methods: A narrative literature review was conducted. The evaluation of the effectiveness of the countries' health policies was carried out using three indicators: the Case Fatality Rate (CFR), the number of cases and the number of deaths per 100,000 people. Results: The very fast response of the governments, the strict lockdown, the quarantine measures, the travel restrictions, the systematic testing, tracing and epidemiological surveillance, the effective communication between officials and citizens, the government's response to COVID-19 focused on allowing the relevant experts to convey important information directly to the public, the testing of older people and health professionals and the mobile tracing applications compose the most important public health interventions. All these measures combined with the adoption and implementation by the citizens and with the organization of health systems, resulted in better management of the pandemic in the countries under study. Discussion: These measures have undoubtedly been important public health policies, which are a testament to future responses to such pandemics.

10.
School Community Journal ; 32(1):225-244, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871820

ABSTRACT

Parent-teacher partnerships involve open and frequent communications. Successful partnerships are important contributors to the learning outcomes of students with diverse needs. However, parents and teachers often have limited opportunities to develop a shared understanding of the student on the autism spectrum and to have conversations about strategies to support the child's learning at home and school. This article evaluates a combined parent-teacher training program, held in Australia before the COVID-19 pandemic, that built and strengthened the parent-teacher partnership. Nine parents and nine teachers were interviewed one month after attending the training workshop. Parents and teachers reported improved communications and a strengthened partnership as an outcome of the training program through an improved understanding of the needs of the student on the autism spectrum.

11.
Melbourne Journal of International Law ; 22(2):1-25, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871647

ABSTRACT

The 1959 Antarctic Treaty entered into force on 23 June 1961. It remains as a unique example of an international law instrument providing a governance mechanism for a single continent. The Treaty celebrates its 60th anniversary at a time when Antarctica is increasingly coming under the spotlight with debate as to whether a Cold War treaty is capable of continuing to provide an appropriate governance framework for Antarctica in the 21st century. The debate has raised issues with respect to the ongoing interests and motivations of the seven Antarctic claimant states (Argentina, Australia, Chile, France, New Zealand, Norway, United Kingdom), the role of historically prominent non-claimant states such as the United States and the Russian Federation, and the interests of others such as China. This article assesses whether the Treaty and the associated 'Antarctic Treaty System' are sufficiently resilient to address the challenges confronting Antarctic governance in the 2020s. These challenges extend to accommodating the interests of the founding Treaty parties and subsequent Treaty parties with respect to their Antarctic aspirations, and the ongoing interest of states in Antarctica's mineral resources. Particular attention is given to whether it remains possible for Treaty parties to request an art XII 'Review Conference' and the treaty review mechanisms that exist within the 1991 Madrid Protocol on Environmental Protection. If the Antarctic Treaty is not capable of amendment, the options for treaty withdrawal are assessed.

12.
Australian Journal of Adult Learning ; 62(1):3-7, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871479

ABSTRACT

The articles are written on some important adult education issues of our time such as therapeutic landscape learning after the COVID 19 pandemic;professional learning in police education;lifelong learning and adult education in Japan;second chance learning in Africa;and adult education and processes of empowerment for people with mental health issues. Drawing on the theory of 'therapeutic landscapes', the paper claims the virtual craft group was able to support lifelong learning and wellbeing by bringing women together in a community of practice, reducing social isolation of individuals and developing new knowledge and skills socially and relationally, including increasing their support network and building friendships. Anh Le and Stephen Billetťs article, 'Lifelong learning and adult education in Japan provides an overview and insight into adult learning in Japan, an area which currently has a dearth of research. The authors claim in Sweden the Folk High School system, is a part of Popular Adult Education, in the spirit of lifelong learning education, it holds a unique position in the Swedish education system as learning is directed to the whole person, and the knowledge and learning that is provided are related to a persons whole life experience.

13.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 19(10):6256, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871334

ABSTRACT

In this study, we examined the psychometric properties of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire (FPQ-9) in Indigenous Australian people. FPQ-9, a shorter version of the original Fear of Pain Questionnaire-III, was developed to support the demand for more concise scales with faster administration time in the clinical and research setting. The psychometric properties of FPQ-9 in Indigenous Australian participants (n = 735) were evaluated with network psychometrics, such as dimensionality, model fit, internal consistency and reliability, measurement invariance, and criterion validity. Our findings indicated that the original FPQ-9 three-factor structure had a poor fit and did not adequately capture pain-related fear in Indigenous Australian people. On removal of two cross-loading items, an adapted version Indigenous Australian Fear of Pain Questionnaire-7 (IA-FPQ-7) displayed good fit and construct validity and reliability for assessing fear of pain in a sample of Indigenous Australian people. The IA-FPQ-7 scale could be used to better understand the role and impact of fear of pain in Indigenous Australian people living with chronic pain. This could allow for more tailored and timely interventions for managing pain in Indigenous Australian communities.

14.
Religions ; 13(5):462, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871109

ABSTRACT

Our work presents a meta-synthesis of 76 peer-reviewed, qualitative-research journal articles related to our research interest in the spiritual care training available for relatives and friends of people living with dementia. A total of 244 articles was reviewed prior to the application of selection criteria. The final sample of 2698 research participants across our selection of 76 peer-reviewed qualitative-research studies serves to demonstrate the value of spiritual care as an aspect of holistic palliative and dementia care. The development and implementation of spiritual-care standards and practices in healthcare generally is increasingly widespread. Most current training resources are designed for healthcare professionals, and our meta-synthesis identifies the need for training resources that equip and train volunteer spiritual carers, namely, the relatives and friends of people living with dementia. Our meta-synthesis suggests there is a need to develop training resources that equip relatives and friends with skills that prioritise attentive presence, spiritual intelligence, emotional intelligence, and, primarily, sensory spiritual practices. Beyond this meta-synthesis, developing and trialling suitable training materials and events will become the focus of an action research project.

15.
BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health ; 5(Suppl 1):A1, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1870642

ABSTRACT

The transfer of research evidence into practice has been historically slow, and requires an integration of many elements, including quality evidence, supportive physical and intellectual environments, and facilitation, as discussed at the NNEdPro Sixth International Summit on Nutrition and Health. Examples of applying clinical research into practice focused on the use of group consultations (also known as group clinics or shared medical appointments) to support behaviour change, the role of dietary micronutrients during the COVID-19 pandemic and the potential of Precision Nutrition. An emerging area from early implementation evidence includes group consultations, also known as shared medical appointments, as discussed by Dr Fallows. Group consultations have been shown to improve clinical outcomes for some patient groups (e.g., HbA1c, lipids, BMI), as well as improve self-care and health education, and patient and clinician satisfaction. These groups have been piloted throughout the UK both face-to-face and virtually, with initial findings suggesting they are feasible and acceptable to patients and clinicians. Further work is needed to assess whether these could be cost-effective when scaled-up in National Health Service UK primary care. During the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been increasing emphasis on the central role of nutrition in health, including the role of dietary micronutrients, as discussed by Dr Van Dael and Shane McAuliffe. Nutrition plays an important role in immunity, yet the nutritional status of the most vulnerable population groups is likely to deteriorate further due to the health and socio-economic impacts of the novel coronavirus. Thus, implementation of this evidence into health care practice is key. Precision Nutrition, defined as an ‘approach that uses information on individual characteristics to develop targeted nutrition advice, products or services’, offers an exciting opportunity to further individualise dietary advice for behaviour change, as discussed by Dr Kohlmeier and Dr Hernandez. Precision nutrition is underpinned by the recognition that individuals differ in many important ways due to identifiable molecular traits and can be utilised to determine personalised weight loss interventions based on genetic variants. Use of implementation science is in line with one of the six cross-cutting pillars of the Nutrition Decade: Aligned health systems for universal coverage of nutrition actions. Dr Bell, an Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitian in Australia, provided an overview of key implementation science models and frameworks. Implementation frameworks such as the Action Research Framework, the Knowledge to Action Cycle, and the Spread and Sustain Framework, are underpinned by knowledge creation, effective education, and culture change. Dr Bell then highlighted how theoretical frameworks have provided guidance for the implementation of real world, complex nutrition interventions, including the Systematised Interdisciplinary Program for Implementation and Evaluation (SIMPLE) in Australia, and the More-2-Eat program in Canada.

16.
JMIR Mental Health ; 9(5), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1870641

ABSTRACT

Background: There is currently an increased interest in and acceptance of technology-enabled mental health care. To adequately harness this opportunity, it is critical that the design and development of digital mental health technologies be informed by the needs and preferences of end users. Despite young people and clinicians being the predominant users of such technologies, few studies have examined their perspectives on different digital mental health technologies. Objective: This study aims to understand the technologies that young people have access to and use in their everyday lives and what applications of these technologies they are interested in to support their mental health. The study also explores the technologies that youth mental health clinicians currently use within their practice and what applications of these technologies they are interested in to support their clients’ mental health. Methods: Youth mental health service users (aged 12-25 years) from both primary and specialist services, young people from the general population (aged 16-25 years), and youth mental health clinicians completed a web-based survey exploring technology ownership, use of, and interest levels in using different digital interventions to support their mental health or that of their clients. Results: A total of 588 young people and 73 youth mental health clinicians completed the survey. Smartphone ownership or private access among young people within mental health services and the general population was universal (611/617, 99%), with high levels of access to computers and social media. Youth technology use was frequent, with 63.3% (387/611) using smartphones several times an hour. Clinicians reported using smartphones (61/76, 80%) and video chat (69/76, 91%) commonly in clinical practice and found them to be helpful. Approximately 50% (296/609) of the young people used mental health apps, which was significantly less than the clinicians (χ23=28.8, n=670;P<.001). Similarly, clinicians were significantly more interested in using technology for mental health support than young people (H3=55.90;P<.001), with 100% (73/73) of clinicians being at least slightly interested in technology to support mental health compared with 88% (520/591) of young people. Follow-up tests revealed no difference in interest between young people from the general population, primary mental health services, and specialist mental health services (all P>.23). Young people were most interested in web-based self-help, mobile self-help, and blended therapy. Conclusions: Technology access is pervasive among young people within and outside of youth mental health services;clinicians are already using technology to support clinical care, and there is widespread interest in digital mental health technologies among these groups of end users. These findings provide important insights into the perspectives of young people and clinicians regarding the value of digital mental health interventions in supporting youth mental health.

17.
Sustainability ; 14(10):5801, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1870537

ABSTRACT

Managers need to better understand how information and communication technologies (ICTs) lead to informed decisions about the investment and advantages of such technologies. However, at best, the empirical evidence on the business value of technology is mixed in relation to small firms. A total of 43 firms satisfied the study’s definition of start-ups. The final survey included 54 questions on access to and use of ICTs, innovation, firm characteristics, as well as the participants’ demographics, of which 11 factors were analyzed as part of this study. We found compelling evidence to support the positive effects of ICTs on firm-level innovation and performance based on the primary survey data of 270 small and medium enterprises (SMEs) operating in an Australian regional area. Moreover, we found that ICT strategies and skills are important factors that drive innovation and the overall performance of SMEs. In addition, various conditions, such as an agile workplace culture and international trade, can help firms improve their performance. Young businesses, particularly start-ups with ICT skills, show an improved innovation capability. However, remoteness appears to influence innovation negatively for nascent firms. Thus, managers should focus on improving ICT skills, strategies, and networking that help facilitate tangible ICT investments to foster innovation and growth.

18.
Microbiology Australia ; 42(4):150-196, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1870460

ABSTRACT

This special issue includes 11 articles focusing on development of container laboratories in response to COVID-19;COVID-19 in Fiji;Pacific Regional Infectious Disease Association (PRIDA) - capacity-building for microbiology and infectious disease across the Pacific;meningococcal surveillance in Southeast Asia and the Pacific;tropical fever in remote tropics;movement of arboviruses between Indonesia and Western Australia;Rotavirus surveillance informs diarrhoea disease burden in the WHO Western-Pacific region;surveillance for One Health and high consequence veterinary pathogens (Brucellosis, Coxiellosis and Foot and Mouth Disease) in Southeast Asia - Lao PDR and Cambodia in focus and the importance of international partnerships;Avian influenza H5N1.

19.
Mobilities ; : 17, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1868202

ABSTRACT

This article focuses on the 'frictions' felt by international backpackers who have been stuck and locked-down while they were living and working in regional Australian hostels. Backpackers play a central role as both tourists and migrant workers in Australia, where they undertake significant periods of required farm work in order to extend their visas. They are a highly visible and long-standing mobile population in Australia and are relatively under-studied given their significance to tourism cultures and economies. Based on forty semi-structured interviews with backpackers living and working in Bundaberg, Australia, we explore how experiences of immobilities prior to and during the pandemic restrictions manifest as experiences of escalating and alleviating frictions. Friction is understood as an embodied and relational feeling of tension produced by a shortage of space. Friction has always been a feature of hostel living but prolonged lockdowns and inconsistent health messaging escalated frictions into open conflict. We propose that the concept of friction sits between mobilities and immobilities, and that particular mobility contexts exacerbate such frictions. The article contributes to ongoing discussions on pandemic immobilities and the interwoven concerns of tourism, migration, and labour mobilities.

20.
Plummer, Mark P.; Rait, Louise, Finnis, Mark E.; French, Craig J.; Bates Ccrn, Samantha, Douglas, James, Bhurani, Mansi, Broadley, Tessa, Trapani, Tony, Deane, Adam M.; Udy, Andrew A.; Burrell, Aidan J. C.; Burrell, Aidan, Cheng, Allen, Udy, Andrew, Palermo, Annamaria, Reddi, Benjamin, Reynolds, Claire, French, Craig, Cooper, D. James, Litton, Edward, Begum, Husna, Campbell, Lewis, Ramanan, Mahesh, Plummer, Mark, McAllister, Richard, Erickson, Simon, Broadley, Tessa, Trapani, Tony, Cheung, Winston, Sprint-Sari Australia Investigators, The, Visser, Adam, Mattke, Adrian, Regli, Adrian, Rashid, Alan, Tabah, Alexis, Walker, Alison, Cheng, Allen, Corley, Amanda, Udy, Andrew, Ramnani, Anil, Eidan, Anthony, DeKeulenaer, Bart, Reddi, Benjamin, Richards, Brent, Knott, Cameron, Moore, Cara, Delzoppo, Carmel, Boschert, Catherine, Tacon, Catherine, French, Craig, Austin, Danielle, Brewster, David, Cooper, David, Crosbie, David, Hawkins, David, Jessen, Edda, Martinez, Eduardo, Fysh, Edward, Litton, Edward, Oberender, Felix, McGain, Forbes, Salt, Gavin, Eastwood, Glenn, Taori, Gopal, White, Hayden, Buscher, Hergen, Seppelt, Ian, Leditschke, Isabel Anne, Young, Janelle, Lavana, Jayshree, Cohen, Jeremy, Lugsdin, Jessica, Botha, John, Santamaria, John, Barrett, Jonathan, Singh, Kasha, Laupland, Kevin, El-Khawas, Khaled, Estensen, Kristine, Deshpande, Kush, White, Kyle, Fitzpatrick, Leigh, Campbell, Lewis, Ramanan, Mahesh, Saxena, Manoj, Kainer, Marion, Kol, Mark, Page, Mark, Plummer, Mark, Sterba, Martin, Anstey, Matthew, Brain, Matthew, Maiden, Matthew, Kilminster, Myrene, Hammond, Naomi, Bhadange, Neeraj, Humphreys, Nicole, Jain, Paras, Azzi, Paul, Secombe, Paul, Lister, Paula, Chan, Peter, McCanny, Peter, Britton, Phillip, Janin, Pierre, Krishnamurthy, Ravi, Sonawane, Ravikiran, Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath, Totaro, Richard, Bellomo, Rinaldo, Sanghavi, Ritesh, Bates, Samantha, Peake, Sandra, Bihari, Shailesh, George, Shane, Erickson, Simon, Webb, Steve, Arora, Subhash, Ganu, Subodh, Rozen, Thomas, McKenna, Toni, Kadam, Umesh, Nayyar, Vineet, Choy, Wei Han, Albassam, Wisam, Data entry at the nested cohort, sites, Morgan, Rebecca, Prasad, Lalita, Carstens, Laloma, Bates, Samantha, Rait, Louise, Bhurani, Mansi.
Australian Critical Care ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1866894

ABSTRACT

Background Internationally, diabetes mellitus is recognized as a risk factor for severe COVID-19. The relationship between diabetes mellitus and severe COVID-19 has not been reported in the Australian population. Objectives To determine the prevalence of, and outcomes for patients with diabetes admitted to Australian intensive care units (ICUs) with COVID-19. Methods A nested cohort study of four ICUs in Melbourne participating in the the Short PeRiod IncideNce sTudy of Severe Acute Respiratory Infection (SPRINT-SARI) Australia project. All adult patients admitted to ICU with COVID-19 from 20 February 2020 to 27 February 2021 were included. Blood glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) data were retrospectively collected. Diabetes was diagnosed from medical history or a HbA1c ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol). Hospital mortality was assessed using logistic regression. Results There were 136 patients with median age 58 years [48-68] and median APACHE II score of 14 [11-19]. 58 patients had diabetes (43%), 46 patients had stress induced hyperglycaemia (34%) and 32 patients had normoglycaemia (23%). Patients with diabetes were older, with higher APACHE II scores, had greater glycaemic variability than patients with normoglycaemia and longer hospital length of stay. Overall hospital mortality was 16% (22/136), including nine patients with diabetes, nine patients with stress induced hyperglycaemia and two patients with normoglycaemia. Conclusion Diabetes is prevalent in patients admitted to Australian ICUs with severe COVID-19 highlighting the need for prevention strategies in this vulnerable population.

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