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1.
European Journal of Finance ; 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-20242863

ABSTRACT

This paper investigates the dynamics and drivers of informational inefficiency in the Bitcoin futures market. To quantify the adaptive pattern of informational inefficiency, we leverage two groups of statistics which measure long memory and fractal dimension to construct a global-local market inefficiency index. Our findings validate the adaptive market hypothesis, and the global and local inefficiency exhibits different patterns and contributions. Regarding the driving factors of the time-varying inefficiency, our results suggest that trading activity of retailers (hedgers) increases (decreases) informational inefficiency. Compared to hedgers and retailers, the role played by speculators is more likely to be affected by the COVID-19 crisis. Extremely bullish and bearish investor sentiment has more significant impact on the local inefficiency. Arbitrage potential, funding liquidity, and the pandemic exert impacts on the global and local inefficiency differently. No significant evidence is found for market liquidity and policy uncertainty related to cryptocurrency.

2.
Journal of Economics and Business ; 123, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2238310

ABSTRACT

The common practice worldwide is to trade corporate bonds over the counter (OTC). Conversely, in Israel bonds are traded on an exchange like stocks. We document that during the COVID-19 crisis, trading activity in the Israeli corporate bond market rose sharply despite a significant decrease in liquidity. It occurred without the need for any regulatory intervention. Our findings differ from the evidence on major OTC bond markets, where a liquidity crisis prompt central banks to intervene and ensure market stability. The patterns we document in the Israeli exchange-based bond market resemble to the evidence recorded in exchange-based equity markets worldwide. The findings indicate that trading mechanism may serve as a determinant of financial stability. © 2022 Elsevier Inc.

3.
Journal of Economics and Business ; : 106105, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2150044

ABSTRACT

The common practice worldwide is to trade corporate bonds over the counter (OTC). Conversely, in Israel bonds are traded on an exchange like stocks. We document that during the COVID-19 crisis, trading activity in the Israeli corporate bond market rose sharply despite a significant decrease in liquidity. It occurred without the need for any regulatory intervention. Our findings differ from the evidence on major OTC bond markets, where a liquidity crisis prompt central banks to intervene and ensure market stability. The patterns we document in the Israeli exchange-based bond market resemble to the evidence recorded in exchange-based equity markets worldwide. The findings indicate that trading mechanism may serve as a determinant of financial stability.

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