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1.
Vayu Aerospace and Defence Review ; - (1):123-126, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1787034

ABSTRACT

[...]we are like an oiled Swiss Army knife, which has proven its added value over the years, and is quickly available when called upon". The 'Cougars' of 300 squadron also deployed to Afghanistan several times during 2006 to 2010 Operations took place out of Kandahar Airfield in support of the Task Force Uruzgan. Besides a transport role of supplies also missions to support Special Operations Forces (SOF) where executed. 300 Squadron also supports humanitarian missions like fighting forest fires (Fire Bucket Operations - FBO), in 2004 the squadron deployed two Cougars to Portugal, and in August 2007 towards Greece to support the firefighting there. For these amphibious overseas missions six Cougars (serials S-419, 441, 442, 445 and 447) are available with maritime equipment like floats to prevent the helicopter from sinking when it comes in the water. [...]2015, the squadron was tasked as Patients transport (Air Ambulance) from the Wadden Islands, which are located in the upper north of the Netherlands in the Wadden Sea, to hospitals on the mainland. According to 1st Lieutenant Niels Henderson, Chief Helicopter Maintenance of 300 squadron, this is a unique opportunity.

2.
Rural Remote Health ; 21(4): 6724, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1716364

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Despite UN recommendations to monitor food insecurity using the Food Insecurity Experience Scale (FIES), to date there are no published reports of its validity for The Bahamas, nor have prevalence rates of moderate or severe food insecurity been reported for the remote island nation. At the same time, food security is a deep concern, with increasing incidence of natural disasters and health concerns related to diet-related disease and dietary quality plaguing the nation and its food system. This article aims to examine the validity of the FIES for use in The Bahamas, the prevalence of moderate and severe food insecurity, and the sociodemographic factors that contribute to increased food insecurity. METHODS: The FIES survey was administered by randomized and weighted landline telephone survey in Nassau in The Bahamas to 1000 participants in June and July 2017. The Rasch modelling procedure was applied to examine tool validity and prevalence of food insecurity. Equating procedures calibrated this study's results to the global FIES reference scale and computed internationally comparable prevalence rates of both moderate and severe food insecurity. A regression analysis assessed the relationship between household variables and food security. RESULTS: The FIES met benchmarks for fit statistics for all eight items and the overall Rasch reliability is 0.7. As of 2017, Bahamians' prevalence of moderate and severe food insecurity was 21%, and the prevalence of severe food insecurity was 10%. Statistically significant variables that contribute to food insecurity included education, age, gender, and presence of diabetes, high blood pressure, or heart disease. Results also indicated that Bahamians experience food insecurity differently than populations across the globe, likely due in large part to the workings of an isolated food system heavily dependent on foreign imports. Responses showed that by the time a Bahamian worries they will not have enough food to eat, they have already restricted their meals to a few kinds of foods and begun to limit their intake of vegetables and fruits. CONCLUSION: This study, which is among the first to comprehensively measure food security in The Bahamas, provides a baseline for further research and evaluation of practices aimed at mitigating food insecurity in small island developing states. Further, this study provides a benchmark for future research, which may seek to understand the impacts of Hurricane Dorian and COVID-19, disasters further isolating the remote island nation. Post-disaster food security data are needed to further understand the extent to which food security is impacted by natural disasters and identify which sectors and stakeholders are most vital in restructuring the agricultural sector and improving food availability following catastrophic events.


Subject(s)
Food Insecurity , Food Supply/statistics & numerical data , Hunger , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Bahamas , Humans , Prevalence , Reproducibility of Results , Socioeconomic Factors
3.
Journal of Travel and Tourism Marketing ; 38(9):957-974, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1704880

ABSTRACT

This study explicates the relationships between cruise participants and destination host communities to examine types of conflicts (i.e., conflicts between cruise tourists and residents, residents and local governments, and residents and their fellow residents) and resident perceptions. Survey data from local Bahamians were collected online. The results revealed that residents experiencing different degrees of conflict displayed significant differences in their responses toward cruise tourism. This research further discloses significant factors for predicting the types of conflicts that may arise within host communities. As this research provides insights into the significance of promoting mutual understanding between stakeholders on the impacts of cruise tourism, the findings provide both theoretical and practical implications and suggestions for researchers and cruise destination managers/policy makers on cruise tourism–related sustainable destination development. © 2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

4.
International Research Journal of Innovations in Engineering and Technology ; 5(6):749-753, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1560224

ABSTRACT

Caused by a novel coronavirus, COVID-19 has played havoc on many countries across the globe and the Bahamas have never been an exception. Just like the rest of the world, the country continues to live a restricted environment in order to prevent exposure to this highly infectious disease. In this research article, the ANN approach was used to model and forecast daily COVID-19 cases in Bahamas. This study is based on daily new cases of COVID-19 in Bahamas for the period 1 January 2020 – 25 March 2021. The out-of-sample forecast covers the period 26 March 2021 – 31 July 2021. The residuals and forecast evaluation criteria (Error, MSE and MAE) of the applied model show us that the model is stable in forecasting COVID-19 daily new infections in Bahamas. The results of the study indicate that daily COVID-19 cases in Bahamas are likely to hover around 55 cases per day over the out-of-sample period. We encourage government of the Bahamas to continue enforcing control and preventive measures such as mass-media sensitization, social distancing, face-mask wearing, contact tracing, disinfection and decontamination of infected areas, washing and sanitization of hands and so on as advised by the WHO.

5.
Rural Remote Health ; 21(4): 6724, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513370

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Despite UN recommendations to monitor food insecurity using the Food Insecurity Experience Scale (FIES), to date there are no published reports of its validity for The Bahamas, nor have prevalence rates of moderate or severe food insecurity been reported for the remote island nation. At the same time, food security is a deep concern, with increasing incidence of natural disasters and health concerns related to diet-related disease and dietary quality plaguing the nation and its food system. This article aims to examine the validity of the FIES for use in The Bahamas, the prevalence of moderate and severe food insecurity, and the sociodemographic factors that contribute to increased food insecurity. METHODS: The FIES survey was administered by randomized and weighted landline telephone survey in Nassau in The Bahamas to 1000 participants in June and July 2017. The Rasch modelling procedure was applied to examine tool validity and prevalence of food insecurity. Equating procedures calibrated this study's results to the global FIES reference scale and computed internationally comparable prevalence rates of both moderate and severe food insecurity. A regression analysis assessed the relationship between household variables and food security. RESULTS: The FIES met benchmarks for fit statistics for all eight items and the overall Rasch reliability is 0.7. As of 2017, Bahamians' prevalence of moderate and severe food insecurity was 21%, and the prevalence of severe food insecurity was 10%. Statistically significant variables that contribute to food insecurity included education, age, gender, and presence of diabetes, high blood pressure, or heart disease. Results also indicated that Bahamians experience food insecurity differently than populations across the globe, likely due in large part to the workings of an isolated food system heavily dependent on foreign imports. Responses showed that by the time a Bahamian worries they will not have enough food to eat, they have already restricted their meals to a few kinds of foods and begun to limit their intake of vegetables and fruits. CONCLUSION: This study, which is among the first to comprehensively measure food security in The Bahamas, provides a baseline for further research and evaluation of practices aimed at mitigating food insecurity in small island developing states. Further, this study provides a benchmark for future research, which may seek to understand the impacts of Hurricane Dorian and COVID-19, disasters further isolating the remote island nation. Post-disaster food security data are needed to further understand the extent to which food security is impacted by natural disasters and identify which sectors and stakeholders are most vital in restructuring the agricultural sector and improving food availability following catastrophic events.


Subject(s)
Food Insecurity , Food Supply/statistics & numerical data , Hunger , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Bahamas , Humans , Prevalence , Reproducibility of Results , Socioeconomic Factors
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