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1.
J Environ Stud Sci ; 12(2): 272-282, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239613

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and climate change are two global crises that require collective action. Yet, the inertia typically associated with behavior change to limit climate change stands in contrast to the speed associated with behavior change to stop the spread of COVID-19. Identifying the roots of these differences can help us stimulate climate-friendly behaviors. We assessed the extent to which a number of theory-based drivers underlie behaviors aiming to counter COVID-19 and climate change with an online survey (N = 534). We focused on the role of a number of drivers derived from prominent behavior change theories and meta-analyses in the field, namely, personal threat, threat to close others, threat to vulnerable others, fear, participative efficacy, injunctive and descriptive social norms, and governmental policy perceptions. We investigated (1) what drivers people perceived as most important to engage in behaviors that limit the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change and (2) the strength of the associations between these drivers and engaging in behaviors that limit the spread of the pandemic and climate change. Results highlight three key drivers for climate change action: changing perceptions of governmental policy and perceptions of threat to close others and priming participative efficacy beliefs.

2.
Frontiers of COVID-19: Scientific and Clinical Aspects of the Novel Coronavirus 2019 ; : 337-349, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20243097

ABSTRACT

Until pharmacological measures are rolled out on a global scale, reducing the transmission of COVID-19 and preventing future outbreaks require the continued promotion of behaviors known to effectively limit the spread of infections (e.g., physical distancing, hand hygiene practices). The success of such behavioral measures, however, relies on widespread compliance, highlighting the importance of theory-and evidence-based behavior change interventions targeting COVID-19 preventive behaviors. Theories of social cognition have recently been applied to COVID-19 preventive behaviors to identify the key modifiable determinants of behavior that can be targeted by strategies or techniques in interventions. The identification of key modifiable determinants of COVID-19 preventive behaviors permits the matching of evidence-based behavior change strategies or techniques proposed to affect change in the targeted determinants. The goal of this chapter is to provide an overview of the social cognition literature and interventions targeting key psychological constructs as means to adopt and maintain COVID-19 preventive behaviors. The chapter also provides example materials used in behavior change interventions based on social cognition theory, which may have application across a broad range of COVID-19 preventive behaviors. First, the chapter provides an overview of social cognition theories that have been used to explain and predict health and social behavior and how behavior change occurs. Next, the emerging research evidence of potentially modifiable social cognition determinants of COVID-19 preventive behaviors are reviewed. Finally, a step-by-step example of how interventionists might develop a theory-based intervention targeting change in an important COVID-19 preventive behavior is provided. The chapter concludes with a summary of some key challenges and future directions in moving forward behavior change research in this area. Overall, this chapter provides information useful to the design and development of effective behavior change interventions targeting the adoption and maintenance of COVID-19 preventive behaviors which are relevant to current and future pandemic contexts. © The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2022.

3.
Handbook of Mobility Data Mining: Volume 2: Mobility Analytics and Prediction ; 2:49-74, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20238732

ABSTRACT

Travel behavior is important in many fields, such as urban management and disaster management. Since the breakout of COVID-19, many people have changed their preference in travel, which is called travel behavior pattern, to respond to the impact of COVID-19. Understanding when, how, and why people change their travel behavior patterns is significant for antiepidemic and estimating the impact of COVID-19 on human society. However, most current studies ignore that travel behavior is multi-dimensions, and it can be a barrier to understanding travel behavior change. To fill up the vacuum of current research, we used an online Bayesian change detection method to detect individual travel behavior pattern change from big mobile trajectory data. For the low data quality problem caused by various and uneven, we design a novel Monte Carlo data grading framework to assess data quality and filter useable data and thus avoid unreliable results. The analysis result shows Tokyo experienced 6 phases of travel behavior change since 2020, and the change was driven by policies to some extent, especially in the frequency dimension and spatial dimension. Also, the correlation analysis indicates the correlation between four travel behavior dimension dimensions, and the infection number provides us with knowledge about how people will make a change in their travel behavior in the COVID-19 period. © 2023 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

4.
Social and Personality Psychology Compass Vol 17(3), 2023, ArtID e12732 ; 17(3), 2023.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-20235899

ABSTRACT

Managing collective action issues such as pandemics and climate change requires major social and behavioral change. Dominant approaches to addressing these issues center around information provision and financial incentives to shift behavior, yet, these approaches are rarely effective without integrating insights from psychological research on motivation. By accurately characterizing human motives, social scientists can identify when and why individuals engage, and facilitate behavior change and public engagement. Here, we use the core social motives model to sort social psychological theories into five fundamental social motives: to Belong, Understand, Control, self-Enhance, and Trust. We explain how each motive can improve or worsen collective action issues, and how this framework can be further developed towards a comprehensive social psychological perspective to collective action issues. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

5.
Cogent Public Health ; 10(1) (no pagination), 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20235534

ABSTRACT

Good hygiene and handwashing remain important in public health, particularly in localities with low or no basic water and sanitation facilities. Using the Integrated Behavioural Model for water and hygiene, this study analysed key factors that shape handwashing behaviour and practices and the implications for managing the COVID-19 pandemic. The study was conducted using 20 rural and peri-urban communities in Ghana. Data gathered from 332 households and 20 focus group discussions indicated respondents have considerable knowledge of the significance of effective handwashing with soap, especially at critical moments. Although the practice of handwashing has been promoted in all the study communities, none of the households had a handwashing station. The respondents however argued that the absence of a handwashing station does not imply they do not wash their hands, especially at critical moments. Access to water, ability to buy soap, gender, and long hours of staying on distant farms shaped handwashing behaviour and practices. Although the study was conducted prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the findings have substantial implications for the fight against the pandemic. Given that households are knowledgeable of the importance of handwashing, re-iterating the practice and intensifying advocacy on behavioural change, especially in the COVID-19 pandemic will reinvigorate handwashing.Copyright © 2023 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

6.
Iranian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences ; 18(2):116-127, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20235375

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of psychiatric disorders namely depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances has been increased worldwide, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this regard, the interest of recent investigations is moved toward phytomedicines and bioactive substances derived from natural sources. Although Tilia platyphyllos Scop. contains high amounts of phenolic compounds such as quercetin, kaempferol, and catechin, there is no study on the possible effects of its extract on psychological disorders. The present study was carried out to determine the antidepressant-like, anxiolytic, and sedative-hypnotic effects of the hydroethanolic extract of T. platyphyllos leaves using forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), elevated plus maze test (EPMT), pentobarbital-induced loss of righting reflex test and open field test (OFT). Following the ethanolic extraction of T. platyphyllos leaves, the extraction yield was 14% and the total phenolic and total flavonoid contents were found to be 135.23 +/- 0.14 mg gallic acid equivalent/g dry extract and 19.02 +/- 0.03 mg rutin equivalent/g dry extract, respectively. Both FTS and TST revealed a significant antidepressant-like activity for the tested extract at 400 mg/kg compared to the control group. In addition, the anxiolytic activity of the extract was proven through OFT and EPMT in the same dose. Finally, T. platyphyllos extract at 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg significantly increased the sleeping time when compared to the control group reflecting its potential hypnotic activity. Co-administration of T. platyphyllos extract at 400 mg/kg and flumazenil as the GABA-A receptor antagonist decreased the sleeping time but the observed effect was not statistically significant. Therefore, we cannot completely rule out the GABA-A receptor's involvement in the hypnotic activity of the extract. The biological results presented here led us to conclude that T. platyphyllos extract can be a prominent source of antidepressant, anxiolytic and hypnotic agents. Probably, the main phenolic compounds of T. platyphyllos such as quercetin, kaempferol, and catechin are involved in the observed effects. However, there is still a great need for additional investigations on the exact mechanisms.Copyright © 2022, Iranian Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists. All rights reserved.

7.
Research Journal of Pharmaceutical, Biological and Chemical Sciences ; 14(3):59-67, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20234752

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has brought a significant change in the lives of all population segments. Irrespective of the country, religion, economic status, and position worldwide, a committed thought is developed on "IMMUNITY" and "IMMUNITY BOOSTERS."The nutrition and health portfolio of many populations worldwide reported severe impacts from changing trends in modern lifestyle, food habits, food consumption, and the environment. Defining health remains a crucial task over several decades. The present study is to understand and evaluate the knowledge and purchasing behaviour of the population during COVID-19 time. A survey is conducted through social media platforms with pre-designed and tested questionnaires. Data were collected from 200 respondents. A rapid assessment survey was conducted using Google Forms. Google Form was distributed through various social media platforms such as WhatsApp, Facebook, and LinkedIn in Indian communities residing across the globe. The above data shows that 64% have consumed Vitamin C supplements almost every day for 15 days, 13% for one month, 10% of the respondents more than one month, and 13% took supplements as supplements per the doctor's advice. The results indicate that nearly 73% of the respondents started consuming supplements, 15% sometimes, and 4% of the respondents expressed their consumption was on and off. When questioned in detail, it is mentioned that they have taken supplements. The results depict buying behaviours, reading and understanding the food labels, purchasing supplements and immune boostersCopyright © 2023, Research Journal of Pharmaceutical, Biological and Chemical Sciences.All Rights Reserved.

8.
Diabetic Medicine ; 40(Supplement 1):173, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20234427

ABSTRACT

Background: Approximately 10% of people living with type 2 diabetes in Waltham Forest (WF) who are treated with oral hypoglycaemic agents (OHA) alone and not under specialist care have an HbA1c > 75mmol/mol. No optimisation clinic exists at PCN level in WF, despite maximum capacity reached in specialist community and secondary care clinics. Aim(s): To establish a remote PCN based optimisation clinic during the Covid-19 pandemic, using motivational and patient empowerment interviewing techniques. Improvement in HbA1c, blood pressure and lipid profile underpinned the study. The 'behaviour change model' was also used to assess patient engagement. Method(s): We identified and consulted with 43 patients using an extended consultation of 25 min. Engagement and recall after 3 months were facilitated by a dedicated administrator and optimal care was ensured via monthly remote consultant input. Result(s): 38 patients were optimised with oral hypoglycaemic agents (OHA) alone and completed the pilot. 31/38 patients had an HbA1c reduction of more than 11mmol/ mol, with a significant overall median reduction across the whole cohort (pre 88mmol/mol vs 70mmol/mol, p < 0.0001). There was also a significant median reduction in triglyceride level (pre 1.56mmol/l vs 1.20mmol/l, p = 0.0247). In terms of behaviour change, all but one patient improved their behaviour towards their diabetes significantly. The approximate cost of the pilot per patient was 263 (excluding medication). Conclusion(s): A PCN based optimisation clinic using active recall is a cost effective and efficient method for significantly improving glycaemic control in people living with type 2 diabetes.

9.
Qual Theory Dyn Syst ; 22(3): 113, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245369

ABSTRACT

To investigate the influence of human behavior on the spread of COVID-19, we propose a reaction-diffusion model that incorporates contact rate functions related to human behavior. The basic reproduction number R0 is derived and a threshold-type result on its global dynamics in terms of R0 is established. More precisely, we show that the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable if R0≤1; while there exists a positive stationary solution and the disease is uniformly persistent if R0>1. By the numerical simulations of the analytic results, we find that human behavior changes may lower infection levels and reduce the number of exposed and infected humans.

10.
Front Pediatr ; 11: 1135415, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242543

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic with its containment measures such as closures of schools and daycare facilities led to numerous restrictions in daily life, putting developmental opportunities and health-related quality of life in children at risk. However, studies show that not every family was impacted equally by the pandemic and that this exceptional health and societal situation reinforced pre-existing health inequalities among the vulnerable. Our study aimed at analyzing changes in behavior and health-related quality of life of children attending elementary schools and daycare facilities in Bavaria, Germany in spring 2021. We also sought to identify associated factors contributing to inequalities in quality of life. Methods: Data from a multi-center, open cohort study ("COVID Kids Bavaria") conducted in 101 childcare facilities and 69 elementary schools across all electoral districts of Bavaria were analyzed. Children attending these educational settings (aged 3-10 years) were eligible for participation in a survey on changes in behavior and health-related quality of life. The KINDLR questionnaire (based on children's self-report and parental report) was administered about one year after the onset of the pandemic (spring 2021). Descriptive and logistic regression analyses and comparisons to pre-pandemic KiGGS (German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents) data were undertaken. Results: Among respondents, a high percentage of parents reported changes in their children's eating and sleeping behavior, sports and outdoor activities as well as altered screen time. Health-related quality of life in KINDLR analyses compared to pre-pandemic population averages were lower in all age groups (for 3-6-year-old KINDLR-total score: COVID Kids Bavaria MD 74.78 ± 10.57 vs KiGGS data 80.0 ± 8.1; 7-10 years-old KINDLR-total score: COVID Kids Bavaria MD 73.88 ± 12.03 vs KiGGS data 79.30 ± 9.0). No significant differences were detected with regard to associated factors, namely type of institution, sex of the child, migration background, household size and parental education. Conclusion: These findings suggest a relevant impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on children's behavior and health-related quality of life one year after the onset of the pandemic. Further analyses in large-scale longitudinal studies are needed to determine the effects of specific pandemic or crisis associated factors contributing to health inequalities.

11.
JMIR Form Res ; 7: e43981, 2023 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234850

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The acceleration of technology-based primary care during the COVID-19 pandemic outpaced the ability to understand whether and how it impacts care delivery and outcomes. As technology-based care continues to evolve, focusing on the core construct of compassion in a primary care context will help ensure high-quality patient care and increased patient autonomy and satisfaction. The ability to successfully operationalize the use of technology in patient-clinician interactions hinges on understanding not only how compassionate care is experienced in this context but also how clinicians can create it. OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study were to understand whether and how compassionate behaviors are experienced in technology-based primary care interactions and identify the individual and contextual drivers that influence whether and how these behaviors occur. METHODS: We conducted a series of qualitative one-on-one interviews with primary care physicians, nurses, and patients. Qualitative data were initially analyzed using an inductive thematic analysis approach to identify preliminary themes for each participant group independently. We then looked across participant groups to identify areas of alignment and distinction. Descriptions of key behaviors that participants identified as elements of a compassionate interaction and descriptions of key drivers of these behaviors were inductively coded and defined at this stage. RESULTS: A total of 74 interviews were conducted with 40 patients, 20 nurses, and 14 primary care physicians. Key behaviors that amplified the experience of compassion included asking the patient's modality preference, using video to establish technology-based presence, sharing the screen, and practicing effective communication. Participants' knowledge or skills as well as their beliefs and emotions influenced whether or not these behaviors occurred. Contextual elements beyond participants' control influenced technology-based interactions, including resource access, funding structures, culture, regulatory standards, work structure, societal influence, and patient characteristics and needs. A high-yield, evidence-based approach to address the identified drivers of compassion-focused clinician behavior includes a combination of education, training, and enablement. CONCLUSIONS: Much of the patient experience is influenced by clinician behavior; however, clinicians need a supportive system and adequate supports to evolve new ways of working to create the experience of compassionate care. The current state of technology-based care operationalization has led to widespread burnout, societal pressure, and shifting expectations of both clinicians and the health system more broadly, threatening the ability to deliver compassionate care. For clinicians to exhibit compassionate behaviors, they need more than just adequate supports; they also need to receive compassion from and experience the humanity of their patients.

12.
International Journal of Infectious Diseases ; 130(Supplement 2):S39, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2325220

ABSTRACT

While the World Health Organization strongly recommends HIV self-testing (HIVST) as an approach to HIV testing services, scale up has been minimal in low- and middle-income countries. Vietnam has successfully delivered HIVST at scale for key populations (KP), including men who have sex with men, transgender women, people who inject drugs, female sex workers and their partners. We reviewed data from the USAID/PATH Healthy Markets (2014-2021), including consumer surveys, HIVST usability and performance assessments, and service data to summarize the five stages of HIVST scale-up in Vietnam: 1) Assessing HIVST acceptability, preferences, and willingness to pay (WTP);2) Piloting HIVST;3) Developing HIVST policies and assessing products;4) Facilitating HIVST market authorization;and 5) Implementing differentiated service models. A '5A' approach was employed to shape HIVST markets, i.e., improving affordability, enhancing availability, assuring quality, ensuring appropriate design, and boosting awareness and demand. We assessed key factors related to HIVST supply and demand. In terms of supply, the median price people were willing to pay was US$4.3 per test. HIVST products with stringent regulatory approval successfully obtained free sale certificate registration, and blood-based HIVST products were highly accurate (99%-99.8%). Differentiated HIVST distribution models played a significant role in scaling-up HIVST and ensuring uninterrupted access to essential HIV services, e.g., pre-exposure prophylaxis monitoring during COVID-19 lock-downs. Related to demand and testing uptake, the majority of KPs accessing HIVST were first time HIV testers. Creative online-to-offline behavior change communication increased client awareness, trust, and use of HIVST. HIVST was successful in reaching first-time testers who may not otherwise test or seek facility-based care. HIVST is an effective strategy for reaching undiagnosed individuals and is accepted and preferred by KPs. HIVST scale-up requires enabling policy, intensive demand generation efforts, and differentiated service models.Copyright © 2023

13.
Am J Health Promot ; : 8901171221132750, 2022 Oct 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2321766

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess how previous experiences and new information contributed to COVID-19 vaccine intentions. DESIGN: Online survey (N = 1264) with quality checks. SETTING: Cross-sectional U.S. survey fielded June 22-July 18, 2020. SAMPLE: U.S. residents 18+; quotas reflecting U.S. Census, limited to English speakers participating in internet panels. MEASURES: Media literacy for news content and sources, COVID-19 knowledge; perceived usefulness of health experts; if received flu vaccine in past 12 months; vaccine willingness scale; demographics. ANALYSIS: Structural equation modelling. RESULTS: Perceived usefulness of health experts (b = .422, P < .001) and media literacy (b = .162, P < .003) predicted most variance in vaccine intentions (R-squared=31.5%). A significant interaction (b = .163, P < .001) between knowledge (b = -.132, P = .052) and getting flu shot (b = .185, P < .001) predicted additional 3.5% of the variance in future vaccine intentions. An increase in knowledge of COVID-19 associated with a decrease in vaccine intention among those declining the flu shot. CONCLUSION: The interaction result suggests COVID-19 knowledge had a positive association with vaccine intention for flu shot recipients but a counter-productive association for those declining it. Media literacy and trust in health experts provided strong counterbalancing influences. Survey-based findings are correlational; thus, predictions are based on theory. Future research should study these relationships with panel data or experimental designs.

14.
JMIR Form Res ; 7: e46230, 2023 May 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326369

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, media sources dedicated significant time and resources to improve knowledge of COVID-19 precautionary behaviors (eg, wearing a mask). Many older adults report using the television, radio, print newspapers, or web-based sources to get information on political news, yet little is known about whether consuming news in the early phase of the pandemic led to behavior change, particularly in older adults. OBJECTIVE: The goals of this study were to determine (1) whether dosage of news consumption on the COVID-19 pandemic was associated with COVID-19 precautionary behaviors; (2) whether being an ever-user of social media was associated with engagement in COVID-19 precautionary behaviors; and (3) among social media users, whether change in social media use during the early stages of the pandemic was associated with engagement in COVID-19 precautionary behaviors. METHODS: Data were obtained from a University of Florida-administered study conducted in May and June of 2020. Linear regression models were used to assess the association between traditional news and social media use on COVID-19 precautionary behaviors (eg, mask wearing, hand washing, and social distancing behaviors). Analyses were adjusted for demographic characteristics, including age, sex, marital status, and education level. RESULTS: In a sample of 1082 older adults (mean age 73, IQR 68-78 years; 615/1082, 56.8% female), reporting 0 and <1 hour per day of media consumption, relative to >3 hours per day, was associated with lower engagement in COVID-19 precautionary behaviors in models adjusted for demographic characteristics (ß=-2.00; P<.001 and ß=-.41; P=.01, respectively). In addition, increasing social media use (relative to unchanged use) was associated with engagement in more COVID-19 precautionary behaviors (ß=.70, P<.001). No associations were found between being an ever-user of social media and engaging in COVID-19 precautionary behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrated an association between higher media consumption and greater engagement in COVID-19 precautionary behaviors in older adults. These findings suggest that media can be effectively used as a public health tool for communication of prevention strategies and best practices during future health threats, even among populations who are historically less engaged in certain types of media.

15.
Prev Med Rep ; 34: 102251, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325290

ABSTRACT

Studies examining individual-level changes in protective behaviors over time in association with community-level infection and self or close-contact infection with SARS-CoV-2 are limited. We analyzed overall and demographic specific week-to-week changes in COVID-19 protective behaviors and their association with COVID-19 infections (regional case counts and self or close contacts). Data were collected through 37 consecutive weekly surveys from 10/17/2021 - 6/26/2022. Our survey panel included 212 individuals living or working in St. Louis City and County, Missouri, U.S.A. Frequency of mask-wearing, handwashing, physical distancing, and avoiding large gatherings was self-reported (more/the same/less than the prior week). Close contact with COVID-19 was reported if the panel member, their household member, or their close contact tested positive, got sick, or was hospitalized for COVID-19 in the prior week. Regional weekly COVID-19 case counts were matched to the closest survey administration date. We used generalized linear mixed models to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations. Evidence for effect modification was assessed using the likelihood ratio test. Increased protective behaviors were positively associated with COVID-19 case counts (ORhighest vs. lowest case count category = 4.39, 95% CI 3.35-5.74) and with participant-reported self or close contacts with COVID-19 (OR = 5.10, 95% CI 3.88-6.70). Stronger associations were found for White vs. Black panel members (p <.0001). Individuals modulated their protective behaviors in association with regional COVID-19 case counts and self or close contact infection. Rapid reporting and widespread public awareness of infectious disease rates may help reduce transmission during a pandemic by increasing protective behaviors.

16.
ERS Monograph ; 2021(93):246-257, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2319553

ABSTRACT

PR is a highly effective intervention comprising exercise therapy, disease education, behaviour change and psychological support. Recent guidelines have attempted to define PR, but the multicomponent character of the intervention means the precise content and delivery of PR is open to interpretation. Robust quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) processes measured against evidence-based quality standards or indicators can ensure that clinical care is provided to a high-quality standard. Providing transparent evidence of the quality of service to patients, referrers and health policy makers will assist the enhancement of referral rates and PR availability known to be poor in many countries and many healthcare settings. The presence of robust QC and QA will also permit the rapid development and evaluation of innovations in the delivery of PR services, such as have been required, for example, during the COVID-19 pandemic.Copyright © ERS 2021.

17.
Journal of Cystic Fibrosis ; 21(Supplement 2):S165-S166, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2318991

ABSTRACT

Background: The benefits of physical training on exercise capacity, pulmonary functioning, and health-related quality of life for people with cystic fibrosis (CF) is well documented [1], meaning it is currently considered part of standard CF care to encourage a physically active lifestyle [2,3]. COVID-19 limited opportunities for people with CF to undergo structured exercise programs in the hospital, gym, or leisure center. To address this, we launched three progressive on-demand exercise programs on Beam (a specialist online exercise, education and wellbeing platform for the CF community, www.beamfeelgood.com) aimed at varying disease severity and baseline fitness levels. Each 12-session program was curated by a CF physiotherapist and designed to build strength and cardiovascular fitness, improve CF symptom management, and increase confidence to exercise. Participants were offered remote coaching to support completion of the program, including email and text support, and joint workouts. Here,we look at the impact of this program on self-reported measures of health and exercise perceptions. Method(s): Adults with CFwere invited via social media to participate in one of three Getting Started exercise programs on Beam. Participants selfselected the program that was most suited to them based on their disease severity and current fitness levels, as outlined in Table 1. Participants were asked to complete pre- and post-program surveys evaluating their general health, emotional wellbeing, appetite, sleep, motivation, enjoyment, confidence, and time and limitations to exercise on a five-point scale. Result(s): Between November 2021 and March 2022, of 71 people signed up for a Getting Started program, 36 completed a minimum of one class, and 16 completed the entire 12-sessions in a program. Of the 16 who(Table Presented) Audience and aims of the three Beam programs completed a program, 75% felt more motivated, 68% felt fitter, 75% felt stronger, and 65.5% were happier. All said their enjoyment of exercise was the same or more than before (37.5% saying they enjoyed it more), and 43.7% said they became more confident. No adverse events were reported. Conclusion(s): This work suggests that CF-specific online exercise programs have the potential to increase strength and cardiovascular fitness levels as well as motivation, confidence, and enjoyment to exercise in adults with CF, although these outcomes were self-reported, and a research trial to evaluate impact on clinical outcome measures is warranted. Additionally, further research and service development is required to improve the programs and increase activation and completion of the exercise programs with greater consideration of behavior change interventions.Copyright © 2022, European Cystic Fibrosis Society. All rights reserved

18.
Current Topics in Behavioral Neurosciences ; 61:v-vii, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2318979
19.
Human-Computer Interaction ; 38(5/6):459-494, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2317465

ABSTRACT

Persuasive games are widely implemented in the healthcare domain to promote behaviour change among individuals. Previous research shows that using persuasive games increases motivation and awareness, leading to a positive change in behaviour. However, there is little knowledge on which persuasive strategies will motivate people at different Stages of Behaviour Change and whether tailoring persuasive games to match users' stages of change will increase their effectiveness with respect to their motivational appeal towards promoting disease awareness and prevention using the ARCS motivation scales and their intention to adopt the precautionary measures. To address this gap, using COVID-19 as a case study, we designed two different versions of a persuasive game, called COVID Pacman, using different persuasive strategies. The two versions of the game target the same goal of motivating the adoption of precautionary measures. We conducted a quantitative study (N=127) followed by semi-structured interviews of 18 participants. The results of conducting an ANOVA on the quantitative data and thematic analysis on the qualitative study show that tailoring the persuasive games to individual's stages of change by using appropriate persuasive strategies increased their effectiveness with respect to their ability to motivate people to adopt the precautionary measures towards disease prevention compared to the non-tailored version. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Human-Computer Interaction is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

20.
Indian Pediatrics ; 60(4):257-258, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2316106
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