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1.
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 10:607-612, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2066694

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic affects the education sector, therefore, the strategy implemented by the government was social distancing and the children’s education must be held at home and they focused on all gadgets A day, so it makes the children rarely interact socially, and also parents also find it difficult to teach social interactions with children. AIM: The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of social skills training on social skills of early childhood education during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This type of research is an experiment with a true experimental design. The population in this study were all early childhood education students in Surabaya. The sample in this study was pre-school age children in early childhood education in Surabaya. The sampling technique is used by simple random sampling. The sample size in this study comprised of 120 students. The indicator to measure the childhood social skills, with seven criteria, was communicative, cooperative, self-effacing, responsible, empathetic, sociability skills, and self-control. This intervention runs in eight sessions. RESULTS: The results of the independent t-test statistical test, p = 0.000 in the intervention group and p = 0.436 in the control group, p < 0.05, it can be concluded that there was a significant change in the level of social skill before and after being given social intervention skills training in the intervention group. CONCLUSIONS: Social skills training has a behavior modification technique. Social skill training has a significant effect on the development of social skills in early childhood education during the COVID-19 pandemic.

2.
Sociologia ; 54(5):385, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2067607

ABSTRACT

Globally, the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted daily activities, which led to a change in consumer shopping behavior as well. The aim of this paper is to analyze how shopping behavior of consumers has changed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic in Slovakia. Two phases of an omnibus survey of shopping behavior were realized (before COVID-19, January 2018 and during COVID-19 pandemic, November 2020, June 2021). The research indicates that consumption patterns changed before and during the pandemic. The majority of Slovak consumers purchased their food at large stores before and during the pandemic. The pandemic resulted in panic shopping among a third of consumers in Slovakia. About more than tenth of Slovak consumers used online shopping more often than before pandemic.

3.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(9):3773-3776, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2067288

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of Covid-19 epidemic has been a once in an event which had altered the life as we had known. Governments and authorities across the world had taken every possible cautious action to avoid the spread of this unusual corona virus outbreak with prime concern over quarantines and lock downs forcing people to stay at their homes. This epidemic had ramifications in the media and entertainment industries, with severe consequences for films, entertainment events, theme parks and other conventional sources of entertainment. As a diversion from boredom, the first lockdown imposed behavior modifications and promoted experimentation. This has made the entertainment business significantly less predictable, necessitating far more flexible and reactive content suppliers, particularly traditional broadcasters. However, as the duration of these lockdowns stretched, people started to look for alternative sources of entertainment to keep their sanity in such stressful periods. This in turn resulted into an increase in digital media consumption in India. The purpose of this study is to determine the most powerful source of entertainment of this period, including a change away from conventional media, particularly among the younger generation, while also analyzing the demands of their forefathers. It has been observed that the millennial generation doesn't prefer radio as compared to older generations do, and the decline in usage and shift in behavior is striking. The younger generation has stopped listening to the radio and has instead resorted to streaming, with many of those surveyed preferring on-demand choices. This illustrates that younger music enthusiasts just aren't as interested in radio as their elder siblings, parents, and grandparents were, which also demonstrates that streaming is generally more desirable. As part of the research, a response from more than 100 persons was sought from various generations which have formed the basis of conclusions of this study.

4.
Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy (Online) ; 54(2):180-183, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2045751

ABSTRACT

In this composite case study, a client sought counselling to manage her anxiety about COVID-19. Theoretical approaches used included psychoeducation, narrative therapy, and cognitive behavioural therapy. These therapeutic methods helped the client experience a reduction in anxious thoughts and emotions concerning COVID-19.Alternate :Dans le cadre de cette étude de cas composite, une cliente s'est tournée vers le counselling pour mieux gérer son anxiété au sujet de la COVID-19. Parmi les approches théoriques mises a contribution, citons la psychopédagogie, la thérapie narrative et la théorie cognitivo-comportementale. Ces méthodes thérapeutiques ont permis a la cliente de réduire ses pensées et ses émotions anxiogenes concernant la COVID-19.

5.
American Family Physician ; 106(3):318, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2033979

ABSTRACT

A collaboration between AFP and the Lown Institute promotes a vision of delivering health care that is based on the evidence, balanced in its approach, and focused on the patient.

6.
The International Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Society ; 12(2):149-165, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2030451

ABSTRACT

This article discusses the changes in religious rituals and social relations experienced by members of the Jama’ah Tabligh as a minority group identified as a cluster in the spread of COVID-19 in Wonosobo, Indonesia. The socio-religious changes during the pandemic were not only influenced by the medical dangers of COVID-19 but also by the societal stigma toward groups of sufferers. This article is based on a research conducted in November 2020 using qualitative methods with data collected through interviews and observations. The results of this study indicate that changes in worship behavior carried out by members of the Jama’ah Tabligh in Wonosobo are caused by the negative societal stigma toward the group. Other groups carried out behaviors of repression and expulsion of all members of the Jama’ah Tabligh, a minority group. As a result of the negative stigma, members of Jama’ah Tabligh responded with a more inclusive attitude. Excessive concerns raised by the community are influenced by mitigation efforts carried out by the authorities in a repressive manner. The socio-religious conflicts that have emerged after the pandemic should be a concern for all groups, beyond health and economic recovery.

7.
The Qualitative Report ; 27(9):1830-1846, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2026764

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed people's social behavior in various fields, especially education and religion. Religious learning activities through social media have increased along with the shift from offline to online learning. Restrictions on physical activity encourage increased online activity. Religious education and teaching began to shift from traditional face-to-face to online teaching. Educational institutions no longer monopolize Islamic religious education. This study examines the shift in religious education authority due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This study has analyzed videos of popular religious studies broadcast on social media, YouTube, and Facebook using a qualitative content analysis method. This study finds that the shift in the authority of religious education can be seen in three aspects: popularity, themes, and learning models. The findings of this study indicate the weakness of traditional educational paradigms and authorities and the opening of new spaces for religious learning. This study complements previous work on Islamic religious education authorities.

8.
Thorax ; 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2020316

ABSTRACT

Correspondence to Dr Mark E Howard, Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia;mark.howard@austin.org.au Models of care that minimise the use of acute hospital beds have become increasingly important during the COVID-19 pandemic, not only to optimise capacity for acute care, but also to minimise infection transmission risks and meet the needs of patients who avoid care due to concerns regarding attending healthcare facilities. An important contribution to designing models for NIV initiation, Murphy and colleagues1 demonstrate that initiating ventilation using auto-titrating NIV at home combined with oximetry monitoring was clinically effective and safe in comparison with in-hospital titration of fixed pressure NIV in patients with stable OHS.1 Interestingly, the healthcare costs over 3 months were similar in both models, with higher set-up costs for the inpatient model, but higher healthcare utilisation costs post set-up in the home-based implementation, including more outpatient and emergency department visits. In addition to cost savings, home implementation reduces the potential risk of infection transmission given the aerosol-generating properties of NIV and enhances capacity for high-dependency acute hospital beds which are critical in the current environment.

9.
Journal of Applied Research on Children ; 13(1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2012733

ABSTRACT

Sleep is related to cognitive functioning, learning, and brain development in the adolescent population. Recent research indicates a rise in the presence of chronic sleep disorders such as insomnia in adolescents, particularly following the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, research on the effectiveness of sleep interventions for adolescents is necessary to guide treatment in adolescents. The authors conducted a systematic review of literature examining research on outcomes of treatment interventions for insomnia on sleep quality and cognitive functioning in adolescents. Results indicate a dearth of research examining effectiveness of treatment in adolescents, particularly in relation to the impact of such treatment on cognitive functioning in adolescents. The following paper provides a brief overview of existing research on treatment of insomnia or related problems including initiating, maintaining and awaking for adolescent populations with a focus on improvement of cognitive functioning within this population. The authors discuss existing barriers to research, emphasize the need to expand sleep research to include cognitive functioning outcomes, and inform best practices for treatment in adolescents following COVID-19. Lastly, the authors propose a call to action encouraging more widespread recognition of the need for research in this area. Key Take Away Points 24 out of 735 records identified through databases were screened for eligibility. The search and subsequent screening procedures outlined several limitations including a dearth of randomized clinical trials, RCTs assessing effectiveness of behavioral interventions specific to insomnia, adequate selection of cognitive functioning measures, sleep assessment measures and other study designs limitations. Only two records remained in the study with CBTi interventions and included objective measures specific for the assessment of insomnia and cognitive functioning. The two remaining studies reported changes in their interventions for working memory tasks;however, effect size and other study design limitations were reported. Barriers and considerations for the insomnia related symptoms and treatment continues to merit attention due to its impact for learning in adolescent population.

10.
The Qualitative Report ; 27(7):1390-1414, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1965177

ABSTRACT

Drawing on Vygotsky's "space framework" (Harré, 1984;Mostofo & Zambo, 2015), this article reports the findings of our action research project that examined student teachers' beliefs and behavior changes while completing a qualitative research project. Our research question was, "to what extent do student teachers change their beliefs and behaviors about qualitative research (QR) after participating in a two-workshop series of qualitative designs in language classrooms and doing a mini-project?" The participants of this study were eight student teachers at an Indonesian university, and the research data was collected through questionnaires and interviews. The study's findings show that student teachers changed their beliefs and practices about QR because they were shown how to do QR by an experienced professional qualitative researcher and conducted a mini-project. In addition, the workshops and the mini-project inspired and encouraged them to become qualitative researchers in TESOL and increased their research literacy such as how to find a research area and setting research goals.

11.
Webology ; 19(2):8132-8143, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1958367

ABSTRACT

The conditions of the Covid-19 pandemic change the perspective of final students in completing their studies. This research is intended to describe how the final students of the faculty of teacher training and education studied during the Covid-19 pandemic. The research approach is quantitative with a survey-descriptive type of research, through random sampling, namely all students at the end of class 2016 and class 2017 from 21 undergraduate study programs in the Teacher Training and Education Faculty, Lambung Mangkurat University. From the distributed instruments, 145 students filled out the instruments. The data collection instrument used a questionnaire, descriptive statistical analysis techniques. The results showed that the general perception of optimistic/pessimistic students was that 57% completed their studies during the pandemic, The nature of pride in completing the study lies in strongly agreeing (64%) so that it can be interpreted that students have great pride. The pride criteria found are accomplished, successful, fulfilled, self-worth, and productive.

12.
International Journal of Indigenous Health ; 17(1):41-72, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1955510

ABSTRACT

This paper introduces an integrative (or braided) approach to Indigenous youth mental health, designed in response to a synthesis of knowledge from three systematic literature reviews and four informant consultations with mental health providers in various disciplines. The braided approach includes core principles of Indigenous Healing models (IH), Child and Youth Care (CYC) approaches, and Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) practices. The purpose of this approach is to best serve the mental and spiritual health needs of Indigenous youth across Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings of this research project informed the design and implementation of an online Indigenous youth mental health program, which is discussed in relation to the research.

13.
BMJ Open ; 12(7), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1950150

ABSTRACT

IntroductionThe COVID-19 pandemic is forcing changes to clinical practice within traditional addiction treatment programmes, including the increased use of telehealth, reduced restrictions on methadone administration (eg, increased availability of take-home doses and decreased requirements for in-person visits), reduced reliance on group counselling and less urine drug screening. This paper describes the protocol for a mixed-methods study analysing organisational-level factors that are associated with changes in clinic-level practice changes and treatment retention.Methods and analysisWe will employ an explanatory sequential mixed-methods design to study the treatment practices for opioid use disorder (OUD) patients in New York State (NYS). For the quantitative aim, we will use the Client Data System and Medicaid claims data to examine the variation in clinical practices (ie, changes in telehealth, pharmacotherapy, group vs individual counselling and urine drug screening) and retention in treatment for OUD patients across 580 outpatient clinics in NYS during the pandemic. Clinics will be categorised into quartiles based on composite rankings by calculating cross-clinic Z scores for the clinical practice change and treatment retention variables. We will apply the random-effects modelling to estimate change by clinic by introducing a fixed-effect variable for each clinic, adjusting for key individual and geographic characteristics and estimate the changes in the clinical practice changes and treatment retention. We will then employ qualitative methods and interview 200 key informants (ie, programme director, clinical supervisor, counsellor and medical director) to develop an understanding of the quantitative findings by examining organisational characteristics of programmes (n=25) representative of those that rank in the top quartile of clinical practice measures as well as programmes that performed worst on these measures (n=25).Ethics and disseminationThe study has been approved by the Institutional Review Board of NYU Langone Health (#i21-00573). Study findings will be disseminated through national and international conferences, reports and peer-reviewed publications.

14.
Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift ; 123(5):213, 2021.
Article in Swedish | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1940313

ABSTRACT

Around the world Covid-19 has been battled by trying to get the public to change how they behave: to reduce social interactions and the risks associated with them. In order to change behaviour it is not enough, however, to simply tell people what to do. Successful interventions also need to communicate how to do it. Here I discuss the difference between nudges (influencing behaviour) and boosts (developing decison making compentencies), and I describe the role that the publics' mental models of the pandemic play in determining their actions.

15.
Shared trauma, shared resilience during a pandemic: Social work in the time of COVID-19 ; : 235-248, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1930231

ABSTRACT

The spread of COVID-19 has led to many public health challenges including detrimental mental and physical health outcomes. For an eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR)-certified therapist who primarily treats a population with an underlying diagnosis of complex posttraumatic stress disorder (C-PTSD), this social phenomenon has presented many ethical and clinical challenges. The continued advancements in technology have promoted a rise in the development and utilization of mobile health applications such as those using EMDR techniques to facilitate the therapeutic process. However, research measuring the efficacy and safety of these applications is limited, particularly for clients who present with complex posttraumatic conditions and associated comorbidities. In this time of collective trauma, virtual EMDR has progressed from an emerging trend to a necessary clinical adaptation. This composite case study illustrates a personal reflection of the adaptation of EMDR to teletherapy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

16.
Shared trauma, shared resilience during a pandemic: Social work in the time of COVID-19 ; : 219-233, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1930230

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 global pandemic has drastically altered the way in which the world operates and human beings interact. The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the bodies, finances, minds, and souls of every individual in more ways than one. People all over the world are feeling the impact of the increase of these stressors, with the psychological impact being potentially as great as the physical. Prior to the onset of this global pandemic, suicide was already considered a major public health problem (World Health Organization, Suicide. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/newsroom/fact-sheets/detail/suicide, 2018). This chapter will offer a reflection on the experience of providing dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. An overview of DBT will be provided in order to highlight the impact of the pandemic on the provider, the patient, and implementation of the treatment itself. Obstacles and adaptations to treatment will be presented through the lens of the four components of DBT by way of narrative and clinical case examples. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

17.
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science ; 54(2):91-95, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1921568

ABSTRACT

Major Depressive Disorder is a highly prevalent, recurrent, and debilitating condition, affecting more than 264 million individuals worldwide. Canadian researchers have made significant contributions to the scientific understanding and treatment of depression. For example, Canada ranks first in the world on the number of articles published on depression (and second on papers determined to be Highly Cited in Field) when considering the proportion of researchers in each country. Canadian psychologists have played a critical role in advancing our knowledge of the epidemiology, vulnerability, treatment, and prevention of depression. This special issue presents a series of state-of-the-art empirical reviews that highlight many of the important contributions-covering cognitive vulnerability, perfectionism, epidemiology, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), mindfulness, and emotion-focused therapy-that Canadian psychologists have made to our understanding of depression. Some of the key themes from these reviews are summarized in this editorial. Aside from featuring outstanding scholarship, this special issue also serves as a tribute honoring the monumental contributions that many Canadian psychologists have made and as a catalyst to inspire next generation of depression researchers in Canada.Alternate :La dépression majeure (aussi appelée « dépression clinique ») est un trouble très répandu, périodique et débilitant qui touche plus de 264 millions d'individus de par le monde. Les chercheurs et les chercheures du Canada ont grandement contribué aux connaissances scientifiques sur la dépression et sur ses traitements. Par exemple, le Canada est au premier rang dans le monde pour le nombre d'articles publiés sur la dépression (et au deuxième rang parmi les plus cités dans le domaine) lorsqu'on tient compte de la proportion de chercheurs dans chaque pays. Les psychologues canadiens ont joué un rôle déterminant dans l'avancement des connaissances sur l'épidémiologie, la vulnérabilité, le traitement et la prévention de la dépression. Ce numéro spécial présente des revues de haut niveau qui mettent en relief plusieurs des importantes contributions - concernant la vulnérabilité cognitive, le perfectionnisme, l'épidémiologie, la thérapie cognitivo-comportementale (TCC), la pleine conscience, la thérapie centrée sur les émotions - faites par les psychologues canadiens pour améliorer notre compréhension de la dépression. Certains des principaux thèmes de ces revues sont présentés sommairement dans cet éditorial. En plus de mettre en relief certains des chercheurs remarquables, cette livraison spéciale sert aussi d'hommage à plusieurs psychologues canadiens aux contributions monumentales qui ont, en outre, été des sources d'inspiration pour la prochaine génération de chercheurs au pays sur la dépression.

18.
Practical Diabetes ; 39(3):10-12, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1898932
19.
Behaviour Change ; 38(4):235-249, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1889999

ABSTRACT

[...]death anxiety has been proposed to be a transdiagnostic construct, underpinning numerous mental health conditions (for a review, see Iverach, Menzies, & Menzies, 2014). [...]the underlying fear of death itself remains unaddressed by current gold standard treatments for mental health conditions. [...]recent research found that death anxiety is associated with how many disorders are experienced prior to current disorder onset, at least for obsessive-compulsive disorder (Menzies, Zuccala, Sharpe, & Dar-Nimrod, 2020b) Despite the importance of targeting death anxiety in treatment, at present, no self-help treatments for this construct exist. [...]to the best of the authors' knowledge, only two published therapist manuals exist, each of which only specifically address treating death anxiety in a single brief chapter (Furer, Walker, & Stein, 2007;Willson & Veale, 2009).

20.
JMIR Formative Research ; 6(5), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871723

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the adoption of digital tools to support individuals struggling with their mental health. The use of a digital intervention plus human coaching (“dual” intervention) is gaining momentum in increasing overall engagement in digital cognitive behavioral interventions (dCBIs). However, there is limited insight into the methodologies and coaching models used by those deploying dual interventions. To achieve a deeper understanding, we need to identify and promote effective engagement that leads to clinical outcomes versus simply monitoring engagement metrics. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a collaborative, goal-oriented communication approach that pays particular attention to the language of change and is an effective engagement approach to help people manage mental health issues. However, this approach has been traditionally used for in-person or telephonic interventions, and less is known about the application of MI to digital interventions. Objective: We sought to provide a dual intervention approach and address multiple factors across two levels of engagement to operationalize a dCBI that combined cognitive behavioral therapy–based techniques and MI-based interactions between the digital health coach (DHC) and user. Methods: We reviewed hundreds of digital exchanges between DHCs and users to identify and improve training and quality assurance activities for digital interventions. Results: We tested five hypotheses and found that: (1) users of a dual digital behavioral health intervention had greater engagement levels than users of a noncoached intervention (P<.001);(2) DHCs with a demonstrated competency in applying MI to digital messages had more engaged users, as measured by the DHC-to-user message exchange ratio (P<.001);(3) the DHC-to-user message exchange ratio was correlated with more engagement in app activities (r=0.28, 95% CI 0.23-0.33);(4) DHCs with demonstrated MI proficiency elicited a greater amount of “change talk” from users than did DHCs without MI proficiency (H=25.12, P<.001);and (5) users who were engaged by DHCs with MI proficiency had better clinical outcomes compared to users engaged by DHCs without MI proficiency (P=.02). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this pilot was the first of its kind to test the application of MI to digital coaching protocols, and it demonstrated the value of MI proficiency in digital health coaching for enhanced engagement and health improvement. Further research is needed to establish coaching models in dCBIs that incorporate MI to promote effective engagement and optimize positive behavioral outcomes.

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