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1.
J Cell Commun Signal ; 14(2): 255, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238459

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a respiratory disease. A recent report in Lancet examined, retrospectively, 137 patients with COVD-19. Patients that died had elevated IL-6 levels and acute respiratory distress syndrome. These data have obvious implications for how to control mortality in COVID-19.

2.
Pravention und Gesundheitsforderung ; 2023.
Article in German | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20235162

ABSTRACT

Background: The risk of a severe or fatal course of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is greatly increased especially in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). For this risk group, it is therefore essential to actively, continuously, and consciously deal with health information on the topic of COVID-19 in order to be able to assess the risks and possible consequences of a disease and to know and weigh up possible courses of action. Question: How do people with a COPD diagnosis deal with health information on the topic of COVID-19? Methods: An explorative qualitative study was conducted with COPD patients. The guided interviews focused on competencies following the health literacy model of Sørensen et al. and the occasions for health information seeking on COVID-19. The interviews were analyzed using content-structuring content analysis according to Mayring. Results: Seven interviews were conducted with COPD patients between March and July 2021. Reasons for the participants to inform themselves about the coronavirus pandemic were especially the fear of becoming infected with COVID-19 as well as the need to find trustworthy information, e.g., about infection figures and measures to contain the pandemic. In this regard, the use of various sources of information about COVID-19 was crucial for respondents. Critical reflection of found information took place at least partially. Measures to protect against infection were implemented by the respondents. Conclusion: In view of the existing uncertainties associated with the pandemic, the use of different sources of information and a reflective handling of available health information on COVID-19 appears essential. Consequently, low-threshold access to reliable and target group-specific health information, e.g., from medical professionals, is of particular importance for people with COPD. © 2023, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Der/die Autor(en), exklusiv lizenziert an Springer-Verlag GmbH Deutschland, ein Teil von Springer Nature.

3.
Curr Health Sci J ; 48(4): 426-435, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233518

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2) infection appeared for the first time in Wuhan, China in December 2019, and in March 2020 it was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO). Thus, a new disease was registered-COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019). Our study followed the patients who had the diagnosis of obstructive ventilatory dysfunction in their personal pathological antecedents, who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection. The patients were in the hospital records with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma. After discharge, patients had a number of outstanding symptoms: fatigue, cough, dyspnea, mental and cognitive disorders, palpitations, headaches, dysfunctions of taste and smell. All patients underwent pulmonary rehabilitation after hospitalization. AIMS: In this study, we looked at the benefits of respiratory rehabilitation over a period of six months after SARS-CoV-2 infection. The medical rehabilitation program included physical training, muscle training, nutritional support, psychological support and patient education. METHODS: A retrospective study was defined between April 2021-December 2021, including 72 patients who had SARS-CoV-2 infection and who presented various symptoms on discharge. The study was carried out at the Clinical Hospital of Infectious Disease and Pneumoftiziology "Victor Babeș" from Craiova-Pulmonology Department. These patients had a history of obstructive ventilatory dysfunction: asthma or COPD. Patients were monitored during the respiratory rehabilitation program at 3 and 6 months after discharge. RESULTS: An improvement in clinical and functional parameters was obtained as a result of the pulmonary rehabilitation. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COPD are increase risk to develop severe forms of COVID-19. Smoking is an important risk factor for SARS-CoV-2 infection and obstructive ventilatory dysfunction. Vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 infection is effective, being associated with mild forms of COVID-19. Pulmonary rehabilitation is a key point in the management of patients with COVID-19, improving exercise capacity, reducing dyspnea, improving health, increasing oxygen saturation and quality of life.

4.
J Clin Med ; 12(11)2023 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232709

ABSTRACT

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is mounting evidence suggesting that COPD patients are at increased risk of severe COVID-19 outcomes; however, it remains unclear whether they are more susceptible to acquiring SARS-CoV-2 infection. In this comprehensive review, we aim to provide an up-to-date perspective of the intricate relationship between COPD and COVID-19. We conducted a thorough review of the literature to examine the evidence regarding the susceptibility of COPD patients to COVID-19 infection and the severity of their disease outcomes. While most studies have found that pre-existing COPD is associated with worse COVID-19 outcomes, some have yielded conflicting results. We also discuss confounding factors such as cigarette smoking, inhaled corticosteroids, and socioeconomic and genetic factors that may influence this association. Furthermore, we review acute COVID-19 management, treatment, rehabilitation, and recovery in COPD patients and how public health measures impact their care. In conclusion, while the association between COPD and COVID-19 is complex and requires further investigation, this review highlights the need for careful management of COPD patients during the pandemic to minimize the risk of severe COVID-19 outcomes.

5.
Front Cell Dev Biol ; 11: 1149499, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238787

ABSTRACT

Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are endogenously expressed RNAs longer than 200 nt that are not translated into proteins. In general, lncRNAs bind to mRNA, miRNA, DNA, and proteins and regulate gene expression at various cellular and molecular levels, including epigenetics, transcription, post-transcription, translation, and post-translation. LncRNAs play important roles in many biological processes, such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell metabolism, angiogenesis, migration, endothelial dysfunction, endothelial-mesenchymal transition, regulation of cell cycle, and cellular differentiation, and have become an important topic of study in genetic research in health and disease due to their close link with the development of various diseases. The exceptional stability, conservation, and abundance of lncRNAs in body fluids, have made them potential biomarkers for a wide range of diseases. LncRNA MALAT1 is one of the best-studied lncRNAs in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including cancers and cardiovascular diseases. A growing body of evidence suggests that aberrant expression of MALAT1 plays a key role in the pathogenesis of lung diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD), Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), lung cancers, and pulmonary hypertension through different mechanisms. Here we discuss the roles and molecular mechanisms of MALAT1 in the pathogenesis of these lung diseases.

6.
Netw Model Anal Health Inform Bioinform ; 12(1): 25, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241602

ABSTRACT

Integration of mobile health (mHealth) applications (apps) into chronic lung disease management is becoming increasingly popular. MHealth apps may support adoption of self-management behaviors to assist people in symptoms control and quality of life enhancement. However, mHealth apps' designs, features, and content are inconsistently reported, making it difficult to determine which were the effective components. Therefore, this review aims to summarize the characteristics and features of published mHealth apps for chronic lung diseases. A structured search strategy across five databases (CINAHL, Medline, Embase, Scopus and Cochrane) was performed. Randomized controlled trials investigating interactive mHealth apps in adults with chronic lung disease were included. Screening and full-text reviews were completed by three reviewers using Research Screener and Covidence. Data extraction followed the mHealth Index and Navigation Database (MIND) Evaluation Framework (https://mindapps.org/), a tool designed to help clinicians determine the best mHealth apps to address patients' needs. Over 90,000 articles were screened, with 16 papers included. Fifteen distinct apps were identified, 8 for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (53%) and 7 for asthma (46%) self-management. Different resources informed app design approaches, accompanied with varying qualities and features across studies. Common reported features included symptom tracking, medication reminders, education, and clinical support. There was insufficient information to answer MIND questions regarding security and privacy, and only five apps had additional publications to support their clinical foundation. Current studies reported designs and features of self-management apps differently. These app design variations create challenges in determining their effectiveness and suitability for chronic lung disease self-management. Registration: PROSPERO (CRD42021260205). Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s13721-023-00419-0.

7.
Pol J Microbiol ; 72(2): 143-154, 2023 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326672

ABSTRACT

Both pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are risk factors for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Patients with lung injury and altered pulmonary vascular anatomy or function are more susceptible to infections. The purpose of the study is to ascertain whether individuals with COPD or PAH are affected synergistically by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Data sources for the construction of a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network and the identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) included three RNA-seq datasets from the GEO database (GSE147507, GSE106986, and GSE15197). Then, relationships between miRNAs, common DEGs, and transcription factor (TF) genes were discovered. Functional analysis using Gene Ontology (GO), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), and other databases, as well as the forecasting of antiviral medications for COPD and PAH patients infected with SARS-CoV-2, were also performed. Eleven common DEGs were found in the three datasets, and their biological functions were primarily enriched in the control of protein modification processes, particularly phosphorylation. Growth factor receptor binding reflects molecular function. KEGG analysis indicated that co-DEGs mainly activate Ras, and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways and act on focal adhesions. NFKB1 interacted with HSA-miR-942 in the TF-miRNA-DEGs synergistic regulatory network. Acetaminophen is considered an effective drug candidate. There are some connections between COPD and PAH and the development of COVID-19. This research could aid in developing COVID-19 vaccines and medication candidates that would work well as COVID-19 therapies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , MicroRNAs , Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/genetics , Signal Transduction/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics
8.
Funct Integr Genomics ; 23(2): 175, 2023 May 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2324466

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has speedily increased mortality globally. Although they are risk factors for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), less is known about the common molecular mechanisms behind COVID-19, influenza virus A (IAV), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This research used bioinformatics and systems biology to find possible medications for treating COVID-19, IAV, and COPD via identifying differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from gene expression datasets (GSE171110, GSE76925, GSE106986, and GSE185576). A total of 78 DEGs were subjected to functional enrichment, pathway analysis, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network construct, hub gene extraction, and other potentially relevant disorders. Then, DEGs were discovered in networks including transcription factor (TF)-gene connections, protein-drug interactions, and DEG-microRNA (miRNA) coregulatory networks by using NetworkAnalyst. The top 12 hub genes were MPO, MMP9, CD8A, HP, ELANE, CD5, CR2, PLA2G7, PIK3R1, SLAMF1, PEX3, and TNFRSF17. We found that 44 TFs-genes, as well as 118 miRNAs, are directly linked to hub genes. Additionally, we searched the Drug Signatures Database (DSigDB) and identified 10 drugs that could potentially treat COVID-19, IAV, and COPD. Therefore, we evaluated the top 12 hub genes that could be promising DEGs for targeted therapy for SARS-CoV-2 and identified several prospective medications that may benefit COPD patients with COVID-19 and IAV co-infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , MicroRNAs , Orthomyxoviridae , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Computational Biology
9.
Respirology ; 28(Supplement 2):153-154, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2318332

ABSTRACT

Introduction/Aim: A chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) criteria-led discharge (CLD) pathway created on evidence-based guidelines was introduced at Canterbury Hospital to reduce unwanted clinical variation detected during a previous Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI) audit. This audit aims to review whether adherence to COPD evidence-based guidelines improved after the CLD introduction. Method(s): The electronic medical records of patients admitted to Canterbury Hospital between 14/02/2022 and 01/08/2022 with a diagnosis of COPD, defined as DRG codes E65A and E65B, were reviewed. Data including patient demographics, admission dates, vaccination status, smoking status and cessation counselling, oxygen targets, inhalers, antibiotics, steroids and referrals on discharge were recorded in REDCap. Deidentified data was extracted into excel, grouped based on admission date being pre or post the CLD implementation date of 09/05/2022. The chi square test was used to determine significance. Result(s): A total of 66 patients were included for analysis (n = 25 pre-intervention, n = 39 post-intervention). Appropriate steroid discharge plans and inhaler technique reviews improved post CLD implementation. Antibiotic usage was more consistent with community acquired pneumonia guidelines rather than infective exacerbation of COPD for both groups. Vaccination documentation was generally poor aside from for Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), though there was significant improvement in the discussion of influenza vaccine post CLD. Documentation of oxygen targets did not improve. Referrals to outpatient respiratory services were high in both groups. Conclusion(s): Introduction of a COPD CLD improved adherence to some aspects of COPD evidence-based management at Canterbury Hospital. Further initiatives should be considered targeting appropriate antibiotic usage, oxygen targets and discussion of preventative measures such as vaccination.

10.
Studies in Natural Products Chemistry ; 76:41-65, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2313272

ABSTRACT

Chronic respiratory diseases affect both the upper and lower airways. The main components of the respiratory system are the rib cage, airways, and the pulmonary interstitium. The airway originates in the trachea, a structure located in the mediastinum, which splits into two parts to form the main bronchus (right and left bronchi). The bronchi gradually divide into secondary bronchi, bronchioles, alveolar ducts, and alveoli. Acute or chronic respiratory diseases are present in all age groups, with many different forms of clinical presentation. In general, the most common diseases are asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, respiratory allergies, occupational lung diseases, pulmonary hypertension, sinusitis, pharyngitis, bronchitis, tuberculosis, cold, and influenza (flu). Among the acute illnesses, infections of the upper respiratory tract, flu, and pneumonia are particularly prominent, and since 2019, we could include in this group the COVID-19 with the beginning of the pandemic of this disease. For chronic diseases, diseases of the lower respiratory tract are the most common, such as bronchitis, emphysema, and asthma. © 2023 Elsevier B.V.

11.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 2022 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317981

ABSTRACT

The family of cytokines that comprises IL-3, IL-5, and GM-CSF was discovered over 30 years ago, and their biological activities and resulting impact in clinical medicine has continued to expand ever since. Originally identified as bone marrow growth factors capable of acting on hemopoietic progenitor cells to induce their proliferation and differentiation into mature blood cells, these cytokines are also recognized as key mediators of inflammation and the pathobiology of diverse immunologic diseases. This increased understanding of the functional repertoire of IL-3, IL-5, and GM-CSF has led to an explosion of interest in modulating their functions for clinical management. Key to the successful clinical translation of this knowledge is the recognition that these cytokines act by engaging distinct dimeric receptors and that they share a common signaling subunit called ß-common or ßc. The structural determination of how IL-3, IL-5, and GM-CSF interact with their receptors and linking this to their differential biological functions on effector cells has unveiled new paradigms of cell signaling. This knowledge has paved the way for novel mAbs and other molecules as selective or pan inhibitors for use in different clinical settings.

12.
IEEE Open J Eng Med Biol ; 4: 55-66, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320172

ABSTRACT

Goal: Millions of people are dying due to respiratory diseases, such as COVID-19 and asthma, which are often characterized by some common symptoms, including coughing. Therefore, objective reporting of cough symptoms utilizing environment-adaptive machine-learning models with microphone sensing can directly contribute to respiratory disease diagnosis and patient care. Methods: In this work, we present three generic modeling approaches - unguided, semi-guided, and guided approaches considering three potential scenarios, i.e., when a user has no prior knowledge, some knowledge, and detailed knowledge about the environments, respectively. Results: From detailed analysis with three datasets, we find that guided models are up to 28% more accurate than the unguided models. We find reasonable performance when assessing the applicability of our models using three additional datasets, including two open-sourced cough datasets. Conclusions: Though guided models outperform other models, they require a better understanding of the environment.

13.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 11(9)2023 Apr 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319337

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Bronchiectasis is the consequence of chronic bronchial inflammation, inappropriate mucus clearance, bacterial colonization, and recurrent or chronic infection. High flow therapy (HFT) is a type of non-invasive respiratory therapy, usually delivered through a nasal cannula interface (HFNC). It delivers heated and humidified air with a stable fraction of inspired oxygen and a wide range of possible flow rates. AIM OF THE STUDY: Determine the effectiveness of HFNC as add-on therapy in adult primary and secondary bronchiectasis with frequent acute exacerbations (AEs) and/or hospitalizations. METHODS: This is a single-center crossover study on long-term home therapy with HFNC in adult bronchiectasis. Pharmacological therapy included pulse therapy with mucolytics and bronchodilators. After one year, all patients were switched to additional HFNC. The temperature range was 31-37 °C. The flow range was 35-60 L/m. FiO2 was 0.21. RESULTS: Seventy-eight patients completed the follow-up; 54% were females; the median age was 70 years (IQR 60-76). The etiology of bronchiectasis was mainly post-infective (51%), COPD related (26%), and congenital (11%). AEs at baseline were 2.81 (±2.15). A significant reduction in AEs was observed after 24 months with a mean of 0.45 (±0.66) (f-ratio value 79.703. p-value < 0.00001). No significant difference was observed after HFNC therapy on FEV1 (2.39 ± 0.87 vs. 2.55 ± 0.82; f-ratio 0.79. p-value 0.45) and FVC (2.73 ± 0.88 vs. 2.84 ± 0.90; f-ratio 0.411. p-value 0.66). A significant reduction in mMRC score was observed after HFNC therapy (2.40 ± 0.81 vs. 0.97 ± 0.97 at 2 months vs. 0.60 ± 0.78 at 24 months; f-ratio value 95.512. p-value < 0.00001). CONCLUSIONS: HFNC is a well-tolerated add-on therapy for adult bronchiectasis. Dyspnea improved after 2 months and further after 2 years. The exacerbation rate decreased during the 2 years follow-up. No significant difference was observed in lung function.

14.
Chronic Obstr Pulm Dis ; 2023 May 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317991

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Patient with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) have an increased risk of severe Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), which is why self-isolation was recommended. However, long periods of social isolation accompanied with limited access to health care systems might influence the outcome of patients with severe COPD negatively. Methods: Data from COPD and pneumonia patients at Charité-Universitätsmedizin, Berlin and the volume of endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR) from the German lung emphysema registry (Lungenemphysem Register e.V.) were analyzed from pre-pandemic (2012 to 2019) to pandemic (2020 and 2021) period. In addition, 52 patients with COPD GOLD IV status included in the lung emphysema registry received questionnaires during lockdowns from June 2020 to April 2021. Results: Admissions and ventilation therapies administered to COPD patients significantly decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Likewise, there was a reduction of ELVR treatments and follow-ups registered in German emphysema centers. Mortality was slightly higher among patients hospitalized with COPD during pandemic. Increasing proportions of COPD patients with GOLD III and GOLD IV status reported behavioral changes and subjective feelings of increasing COPD symptoms the longer the lockdown lasted. However, COPD symptom questionnaires revealed stable COPD symptoms over the pandemic time-period. Summary: This study reveals reduced COPD admissions and elective treatment procedures of COPD patients during pandemic, but a slight increase of mortality among patients hospitalized with COPD irrespective of COVID-19. Correspondingly, patients with severe COPD reported subjective deterioration of their health status probably caused by their very strict compliance to lockdown measures.

15.
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol ; 324(6): L870-L878, 2023 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316990

ABSTRACT

Chronic lung disease is often accompanied by disabling extrapulmonary symptoms, notably skeletal muscle dysfunction and atrophy. Moreover, the severity of respiratory symptoms correlates with decreased muscle mass and in turn lowered physical activity and survival rates. Previous models of muscle atrophy in chronic lung disease often modeled chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and relied on cigarette smoke exposure and LPS stimulation, but these conditions independently affect skeletal muscle even without accompanying lung disease. Moreover, there is an emerging and pressing need to understand the extrapulmonary manifestations of long-term post-viral lung disease (PVLD) as found in COVID-19. Here, we examine the development of skeletal muscle dysfunction in the setting of chronic pulmonary disease caused by infection due to the natural pathogen Sendai virus using a mouse model of PVLD. We identify a significant decrease in myofiber size when PVLD is maximal at 49 days after infection. We find no change in the relative types of myofibers, but the greatest decrease in fiber size is localized to fast-twitch-type IIB myofibers based on myosin heavy chain immunostaining. Remarkably, all biomarkers of myocyte protein synthesis and degradation (total RNA, ribosomal abundance, and ubiquitin-proteasome expression) were stable throughout the acute infectious illness and chronic post-viral disease process. Together, the results demonstrate a distinct pattern of skeletal muscle dysfunction in a mouse model of long-term PVLD. The findings thereby provide new insights into prolonged limitations in exercise capacity in patients with chronic lung disease after viral infections and perhaps other types of lung injury.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our study used a mouse model of post-viral lung disease to study the impact of chronic lung disease on skeletal muscle. The model reveals a decrease in myofiber size that is selective for specific types of myofibers and an alternative mechanism for muscle atrophy that might be independent of the usual markers of protein synthesis and degradation. The findings provide a basis for new therapeutic strategies to correct skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic respiratory disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Humans , COVID-19/pathology , Muscle, Skeletal/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/metabolism , Muscular Atrophy/etiology , Muscular Atrophy/metabolism
16.
J Med Life ; 16(3): 447-450, 2023 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315884

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the potential impact of this disease on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Patients with established cardiovascular (CV) disease are at increased risk of severe infection and hospital-acquired adverse outcomes. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of comorbidities in COVID-19 patients. We analyzed data from 220 patients who previously contracted COVID-19. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. The average age of the patients was 54.6 ± 11.4 years, and arterial hypertension (AH) was the most common comorbidity, affecting 55% of patients. Obesity was observed in one-third of patients, while coronary heart disease (CHD) and coronary heart failure (CHF) were reported in 17.7% and 11.8% of patients, respectively. Chronic kidney disease (CKD), atrial fibrillation (AF), and obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were less common. Cardiovascular diseases, particularly AH, were the most frequent comorbidities in COVID-19 patients. Understanding the prevalence and characteristics of comorbidities in COVID-19 patients is crucial for developing appropriate management strategies and improving clinical outcomes. Our findings highlight the importance of identifying and managing comorbidities in COVID-19 patients to reduce the risk of severe COVID-19 and improve clinical outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Heart Failure , Hypertension , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/complications , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Comorbidity , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology
17.
Rev Clin Esp ; 223(5): 298-309, 2023 May.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314916

ABSTRACT

Objective: This work aimed to compare the characteristics, progress, and prognosis of patients with COPD hospitalized due to COVID-19 in Spain in the first wave with those of the second wave. Material and methods: This is an observational study of patients hospitalized in Spain with a diagnosis of COPD included in the SEMI-COVID-19 registry. The medical history, symptoms, analytical and radiological results, treatment, and progress of patients with COPD hospitalized in the first wave (from March to June 2020) versus those hospitalized in the second wave (from July to December 2020) were compared. Factors associated with poor prognosis, defined as all-cause mortality and a composite endpoint that included mortality, high-flow oxygen therapy, mechanical ventilation, and ICU admission, were analyzed. Results: Of the 21,642 patients in the SEMI-COVID-19 Registry, 6.9% were diagnosed with COPD: 1,128 (6.8%) in WAVE1 and 374 (7.7%) in WAVE2 (p = 0.04). WAVE2 patients presented less dry cough, fever and dyspnea, hypoxemia (43% vs 36%, p < 0.05), and radiological condensation (46% vs 31%, p < 0.05) than WAVE1 patients. Mortality was lower in WAVE2 (35% vs 28.6%, p = 0.01). In the total sample, mortality and the composite outcome of poor prognosis were lower among patients who received inhalation therapy. Conclusions: Patients with COPD admitted to the hospital due to COVID-19 in the second wave had less respiratory failure and less radiological involvement as well as a better prognosis. These patients should receive bronchodilator treatment if there is no contraindication for it.

18.
J Asthma ; : 1-12, 2023 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314661

ABSTRACT

Background: Good adherence to an inhaled medication protocol is necessary for the management of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and several interventions to improve adherence have been reported. However, the impact of patient life changes and psychological aspects on treatment motivation is obscure. Here, we investigated changes in inhaler adherence during the COVID-19 pandemic and how lifestyle and psychological changes affected it.Methods: Seven-hundred sixteen adult patients with asthma and COPD who had visited Nagoya University Hospital between 2015 and 2020 were selected. Among them, 311 patients had received instruction at a pharmacist-managed clinic (PMC). We distributed one-time cross-sectional questionnaires from January 12 to March 31, 2021. The questionnaire covered the status of hospital visits, inhalation adherence before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, lifestyles, medical conditions, and psychological stress. The Adherence Starts with Knowledge-12 (ASK-12) was used to assess adherence barriers.Results: Four-hundred thirty-three patients answered the questionnaire. Inhalation adherence was significantly improved in both diseases during the COVID-19 pandemic. The most common reason for improved adherence was fear of infection. Patients with improved adherence were more likely to believe that controller inhalers could prevent COVID-19 from becoming more severe. Improved adherence was more common in patients with asthma, those not receiving counseling at PMC, and those with poor baseline adherence.Conclusions: Inhalation adherence for asthma and COPD improved in the COVID-19 pandemic. The patients seemed to realize the necessity and benefits of the medication more strongly than before the pandemic, which motivated them to improve adherence.

19.
Mol Cell Biochem ; 2023 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312822

ABSTRACT

This article discusses the connection between the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a multifaceted respiratory illness that is typically observed in individuals with chronic exposure to chemical irritants or severe lung damage caused by various pathogens, including SARS-CoV-2 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The pathogenesis of COPD is complex, involving a variety of genotypes and phenotypic characteristics that result in severe co-infections and a poor prognosis if not properly managed. We focus on the role of SARS-CoV-2 infection in severe COPD exacerbations in connection to P.  aeruginosa infection, covering pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapy. This review also includes a thorough structural overview of COPD and recent developments in understanding its complicated and chronic nature. While COVID-19 is clearly linked to emphysema and chronic bronchitis at different stages of the disease, our understanding of the precise interaction between microbial infections during COPD, particularly with SARS-CoV-2 in the lungs, remains inadequate. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the host-pathogen relationship from the clinician's perspective in order to effectively manage COPD. This article aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the subject matter to assist clinicians in their efforts to improve the treatment and management of COPD, especially in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.

20.
Respir Care ; 2023 Apr 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319021

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) can increase survival time and relieve symptom burden in patients with COPD and chronic hypoxemia. The Department of Respiratory Medicine at Odense University Hospital invites patients with LTOT and COPD to the out-patient clinic for treatment evaluation every 6 months to regulate or terminate treatment and support patients' treatment adherence. The out-patient clinic, however, experiences many absences or cancellations from patients. For that reason, patients were offered virtual consultation as an alternative to physical attendance. This study was initiated to uncover reasons for absences and the patients' experiences of virtual consultation to promote a more patient-centered clinical practice for patients with COPD and LTOT. METHODS: A qualitative study encompassing semi-structured interviews with 20 subjects was conducted in the winter of 2021. The subjects had tried or been given the opportunity of virtual consultation. Data were analyzed inspired by Kvale and Brinkmann focusing on the subject's perspectives on virtual consultation. RESULTS: The analysis resulted in 3 main themes: limitations and vulnerabilities, independence and quality of life, and personal strategies. Subjects expressed that everyday life with LTOT and COPD was characterized by limited resources in terms of energy, oxygen, and time. LTOT was perceived as a necessary means to maintain a sense of independence and quality of life. However, LTOT also meant additional limitations due to cumbersome equipment and feelings of isolation. Most subjects considered the virtual consultation to be oxygen-, energy-, and time-preserving, as it meant avoiding stressful transportation and handling of oxygen cylinders, COVID-19 exposure, waiting time, and not having to involve others for help. CONCLUSIONS: The subjects' perspective showed that follow-up on LTOT as a virtual consultation was considered a valuable offer. The chosen method was found to be relevant in uncovering subjects' attitudes toward clinical practice procedures.

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