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1.
Journal of Christian Nursing ; : 208-208, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2029099
2.
Nephrology News & Issues ; 36(8):5-8, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2012517
3.
Emergency Medicine Australasia ; 34(4):661-663, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1973514

ABSTRACT

The article highlights that balanced multielectrolyte solution (BMES) has been touted as superior to 0.9% saline because of concerns about iatrogenic acute kidney injury and hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis. It also discusses that patients who have suffered out- of-hospital cardiac arrest frequently have cardiogenic shock.

4.
Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society ; 11:S7-S7, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1973200

ABSTRACT

Background COVID-19 is a respiratory infection caused by SARS-CoV-2. Adults with pre-existing pulmonary conditions have been reported to be at higher risk of severe disease, but less is known about COVID-19 in pediatric patients with pre-existing pulmonary conditions. We sought to characterize the clinical course and outcomes of COVID-19 among pediatric patients with pre-existing pulmonary conditions in a national passive surveillance registry. Method Demographic, clinical and COVID-19 related data were obtained from the Pediatric COVID-19 U.S. Registry, a passive surveillance registry of pediatric patients less than 21 years old diagnosed with COVID-19 at inpatient and outpatient facilities across the United States. Centers (n = 170) voluntarily submitted information ed from medical records at Days 7- and 28-days post COVID-19 diagnosis. Of the 13,248 cases submitted to the registry, 2143 (16.2%) cases submitted both Days 7 and 28 surveys as well as completed survey questions related to pre-existing pulmonary conditions. Immunocompromised cases, cases missing Day 28 surveys and those missing pre-existing pulmonary condition survey data were excluded from this analysis (n=11,105). Clinical characteristics were summarized descriptively, and chi-square tests (α=0.05) were used to compare COVID-19 clinical course and outcomes between those with and without pre-existing pulmonary conditions. Results Among the 2143 cases included, 1438 (67%) reported a pre-existing pulmonary condition. The majority were male (53.6%), white or Caucasian (41.7%) and non-Hispanic (62.5%). Pulmonary conditions reported included asthma/reactive airway disease (92%) followed by bronchopulmonary dysplasia (4%) and tracheostomy dependence (3%). Approximately one quarter (n=378) of patients with pulmonary conditions were hospitalized and 151 (13%) were admitted to the ICU. Ninety-six (6.7%) experienced respiratory failure, 63 (4%) required mechanical ventilation, and 1 (0.06%) death was reported related to COVID-19. Compared to cases with no pre-existing pulmonary conditions, those with pulmonary pre-existing conditions were significantly (p < 0.05) more likely to experience chest pain (11.7% vs 6.8), wheezing (10.3% vs 1.6%), dyspnea (27.3% vs 10.5%), cough (46.8% vs 30%), and fever (47% vs 34.8%). Patients with pre-existing pulmonary condition were also more likely to be hospitalized for COVID-19 (26% vs 14.8%), admitted to intensive care unit (13% vs 6.4%) and to progress to lower respiratory tract infection (4.1% vs 0.6%). These patients were also more likely to receive oxygen (18% vs 8.2%), steroid treatment (Day 0 to 7) (14% vs 7.7%), and IVIG (7% vs 4.6%). Conclusion When compared to those without pre-existing pulmonary conditions, our data suggests children with pre-existing pulmonary conditions and COVID-19 are more likely to present with symptomatic and severe disease. Future prospective research is needed to fully understand the impact of COVID-19 among this at-risk population.

5.
Podiatry Review ; 79(3):36-38, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1970682
6.
Nursing Children & Young People ; 34(4):10-10, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1954771

ABSTRACT

There has been a rise in the number of cases of sudden-onset hepatitis in children since January. According to an update on a technical briefing from the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) in April, there have been 145 cases of acute non-A-E hepatitis identified in children aged under 16, as of 29 April.

7.
Journal of Nutrition Education & Behavior ; 54(7):S34-S34, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1921153

ABSTRACT

Early care and education (ECE) workers experience physical and mental barriers to health. The novel Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) worsened ECE workers' physical health, emotional stress, and financial burdens. These measures of well-being are important as they have also been linked to ECE workers' relationship with children in their classrooms. Examine the impact of COVID-19 on the well-being of North Carolina (NC) Head Start (HS) teachers with an emphasis on their personal/professional relationships, personal health behaviors, and stressors. A cross sectional convenience sample of NC HS teachers were recruited to participate in the study. Data were collected from teachers across all three regions of North Carolina September 2020-March 2021 using an online 27-item survey. Researchers analyzed demographic information and quantitative survey data using basic descriptive statistics. Two researchers coded participants' open-ended responses using basic thematic analysis. Survey respondents (n = 88) were predominantly female (97.6%), Black/African American (46.6%) or White (43.2%), with an average age of 43 years old. Teachers reported increased challenges to maintaining relationships with coworkers (57.9%), children in their classrooms (84.4%), and the children's families (81.1%). Half (50.6%) reported COVID-19 impacted their health. Over 70% indicated COVID-19 made physical activity challenging, 61.5% experienced weight gain, and 59% increased their snacking. Teachers expressed an increase in six psychological distress indicators;nervousness (88.9%), hopelessness (54.3%), restlessness (72.4%), sadness (50.6%), everything is an effort (58.4%) and worthlessness (31.2%). Survey results furthered the understanding of COVID-19's effects on HS teacher health. In a workforce overburdened with stress, COVID-19 compounded and created barriers to wellness. Future research should explore avenues to reduce health barriers for all ECE workers during the ongoing pandemic. NIH

10.
Nursing ; 52(5):16-18, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1831368

ABSTRACT

The article reports on the development by researchers of a new clinical score to stratify patients at risk for stroke when hospitalized with COVID-19, which they presented at the 2022 International Stroke Conference held in New Orleans, Louisiana in February 2022.

11.
AORN Journal ; 115(5):P2-P3, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1825862
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