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1.
Disabil Rehabil ; : 1-8, 2022 Mar 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751957

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study explored the experiences of people with acquired brain injury and their families during the COVID-19 pandemic, focusing on how they maintained their communities and sense of belonging, the strategies they found helpful, and advice they have for improving service provision and community connectedness. METHODS: Semi structured interviews with pictorial mapping were conducted with ten adults with ABI and six of their family members. Participants responded to recruitment information circulated by a state-wide ABI peer support network in South Australia. RESULTS: Four primary themes were identified from the findings: (1) disruptions to routine; (2) social isolation; (3) using technology; and (4) strategies for staying safe and keeping well. Results are discussed using a social and urban geography lens and a conceptual framework of belonging to explore the experiences of people with ABI and their communities. CONCLUSIONS: The study reinforces the role of robust peer/support networks to stay connected, stay well and support others. Government, health services and community groups must provide clear and accessible information and supports, and regularly reach out to ensure the safety and wellbeing of people with ABI and their families during the pandemic.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATIONPeople with acquired brain injury and their families experienced increased challenges to maintaining contact with their communities during the COVID-19 pandemic.The main challenges were disruptions to routine, social isolation, and use of technology for health, therapy and social contact.Strategies to support people with ABI to maintain connections, stay engaged, and access technology and information to stay safe and well during lock-down are presented.

2.
Education Sciences ; 12(2):10, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1745071

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 restrictions in schools worldwide constitute an important limitation for peer support among students. The masks, the distance between tables or the established sitting order are new challenges that both students and teachers must face in Spain. The conventional strategies that took place among students prior to the COVID-19 pandemic have been altered. In this study, the mathematics achievement of high-school students prior to the COVID-19 pandemic and during the COVID-19 pandemic is examined. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used. A total of 368 students from 9th grade (ages 14 to 15) participated in this research. Statistically significant differences were reported when comparing the mathematics achievement of pre-COVID-19 and post-COVID-19 students (t = 22.21, p < 0.01). An overall negative effect size of -2.32 was reported for those students with COVID-19 restrictions. Mathematics achievement scores were 9.90% lower for the group with restrictions. No statistically significant differences were reported when analyzing results by gender or repeating condition. The qualitative information supported the quantitative findings. Alterations in peer support was identified as one of the main factors that could explain this decrease. The main conclusion of this study is that current restrictions due to COVID-19 could be producing an important decrease in students' mathematics achievements.

3.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 191, 2022 Mar 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736354

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 social restrictions have increased the risk for depression compared to the previous period in Italian women with Low-Risk Pregnancy (LRP). lLess is known about the impact of COVID-19 restrictions on High-Risk Pregnancy (HRP). This study aimed: 1) to explore levels of depression in women who become pregnant before and during COVID-19 pandemic, distinguishing between LRP and HRP; 2) to analyze the impact of COVID-19 restrictions on pregnancy experience in LRP and HRP. METHODS: A before-during COVID-19 pandemic cross-sectional study was carried out on 155 pregnant women (Mean age = 34.18), between 23 and 32 weeks of gestation. 77 women were recruited before COVID-19 pandemic (51.9% LRP; 48.1% HRP) and 78 women were recruited during COVID-19 pandemic (51.3% LRP; 48.7% HRP). HRP group was enrolled during hospitalization for high-risk pregnancy. Participants filled out Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Moreover, only COVID-19 group answered an open-ended question about the impact of restriction on pregnancy experience. RESULTS: HRP women reported higher levels of depressive symptoms than LRP. No difference emerged for COVID (before/during) but an interaction effect between COVID-19 and obstetric condition was found. The qualitative results showed the impact of restrictions on emotions and concerns. CONCLUSION: Respect to the previous period, LRP women during COVID-19 presented an increased risk for depressive symptoms than HRP. The HRP women during COVID-19 seemed to use hospitalization as a resource to find a social support network with other pregnant women and to be reassured on the clinical ongoing of pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Depression/psychology , Pregnancy, High-Risk/psychology , Pregnant Women/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emotions , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy , Middle Aged , Pregnancy/psychology , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Quality of Health Care , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Gerontology ; : 1-9, 2022 Mar 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731373

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The first cases of COVID-19 in Israel were reported in February 2020. Family visits were prohibited from March 10, 2020, and then allowed on a limited basis on April 20, 2020. This article examines how COVID-19 impacted long-term care residents and their family members from the perspective of long-term care facility (LTCF) administrative staff. METHODS: An online survey was sent to Israeli LTCF administrators between mid-July and mid-October 2020, resulting in 52 completed questionnaires. Quantitative analysis involved descriptive statistics using SPSS, with differences compared via t tests, ANOVA, and χ2 tests. Qualitative analysis involved thematic analysis of responses to open-ended questions. RESULTS: COVID-19 was reported to have multiple types of negative impact on residents, including direct effects on morbidity and mortality as well as indirect effects manifested as negative reactions to measures aimed at limiting infection, including isolation from relatives, decreased activities for residents, and COVID-19 testing. The impact of isolation on LTCF residents was reported as negative or very negative by over three-quarters of the respondents. Behavioral problems among residents increased in 32% of the facilities. The qualitative results suggested that adverse effects on residents and family members were partially mitigated by the use of communication technologies. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: The interplay of multiple factors affected LTCF residents against the backdrop of COVID-19 restrictions. The emergence of mitigating factors which provide solutions to some of the challenges has the potential of improving quality of care for LTCF residents as the pandemic continues and thereafter.

5.
Nutrients ; 14(4)2022 Feb 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707790

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused the abrupt replacement of traditional face-to-face classes into online classes. Several studies showed that online teaching and learning produced adverse mental health for students. However, no research has been conducted so far analyzing the association between the duration of online and food consumption and lifestyle behaviors and quality of life in terms of mental health of undergraduate students. This study aimed to determine the association between the duration of online learning and food consumption behaviors, lifestyles, and quality of life in terms of mental health among Thai undergraduate students during COVID-19 restrictions. A cross-sectional online survey of 464 undergraduate students was conducted at Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, between March and May 2021. The majority of undergraduate students stated that they spent 3-6 h per day on online learning (76.1%) and used their digital devices such as computers, tablets, or smartphones more than 6 h per day (76.9%). In addition, they had 75.4% of skipping breakfast (≥3 times/week) and 63.8% of sleep duration (6-8 h/day). A higher proportion of students who drank tea or coffee with milk and sugar while online learning was observed. The results found that the increased duration of online learning was significantly associated with skipping breakfast and the frequency of sugary beverage consumption. On the other hand, the increased computer, tablet, and smartphone usage for online learning was correlated with lower sleep duration and a poor quality of life in terms of mental health. The findings from this study contribute to a report of the association between online learning and food consumption and lifestyle behaviors and quality of life of undergraduate students, emphasizing the necessity for intervention strategies to promote healthy behaviors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Life Style , Mental Health , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Students/psychology , Thailand
6.
Sports (Basel) ; 10(2)2022 Jan 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700112

ABSTRACT

The home advantage (HA) affects football competitions, especially due to the presence of crowd support. Even though several studies demonstrated that HA (which is influenced by the crowd) decreased in recent years, the empty stadia caused by COVID-19 restrictions offered unique situations to explore and quantify HA. For this reason, we aimed to assess HA in two seasons of the major Italian Championships. We conducted an observational study with the data from the last three seasons of the Italian football championship A-B series, analyzing a total of 2.964 individual game scores. To quantify the HA, the number of points won at home was calculated as a percentage of the total number of points won, home and away. In every season and for every team classification, HA was found (scored points > 50% in home matches). We reported a difference in HA median score for Serie B. Additionally, a difference was found in Serie A for middle-ranking HA median scores in the two seasons compared (p-value = 0.017), which was similarly found in Serie B (p-value = 0.009). The number of penalties was lower in the season with a crowd compared to one without a crowd (p = 0.001). The HA did not disappear in empty stadiums, so there must be other contributing factors. Additionally, we found that the referees were biased by the presence of the crowd in favor of the home teams, and this result could be considered by the football association during referees' training and formation.

7.
Early Years: Journal of International Research & Development ; : 1-14, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1671893

ABSTRACT

Provision of early childhood education and care services for refugee families took on heightened challenges during COVID-19 restrictions. We undertook a small-scale study to explore how Australian educators worked with and cared for refugee families during the COVID-19 outbreak in an urban Australian setting. This paper emerges from a larger project that aimed to support social inclusion and cultural and linguistic diversity for refugee families in Australia. The paper draws on two group interviews conducted during a COVID-19 lockdown with four educators working with refugee families in early childhood education and care. Data analysis is framed by the ethics of care work of Carol Gilligan and Nel Noddings. On the basis of these theories and the interview data, two vignettes on an ethics of care were developed. The importance of being cared for and cared about and genuinely listening were identified as crucial aspects of the care provided to refugee children and their families. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Early Years: Journal of International Research & Development is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

8.
Agronomy Research ; 19(3):1373-1386, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1662890

ABSTRACT

Ensuring food security is a strategic goal of any state, especially in the face of population growth. A review of the academic literature showed the presence of problems in ensuring a high level of food security in China: the rigidity of demand for food, limited land resources, structural contradictions between supply and demand. This study proposes an approach to assessing the level of food security, based on the calculation of an integral index consisting of four units of indicators: the sub-index of provision of crop products, the sub-index of productivity, the sub-index of provision of livestock products, and the sub-index of food import dependence. The results show that, in general, the level of food security in China has increased over the period under review, but there are problems in self-sufficiency in crop and dairy products, as well as in an increase in food import dependence. A forecast of the dynamics of the integral index of the food security level and its sub-indices was constructed, which showed that a decrease in the integral index might occur due to a decrease in self-sufficiency in livestock products and import dependence, while the availability of crop products and yields will increase. The study showed that the measures taken by the Chinese government led to some positive changes, but it is necessary to take a comprehensive approach to this problem, to solve which it is necessary to use the potential of all sectors of the food industry. © 2021, Eesti Pollumajandusulikool. All rights reserved.

9.
J Crim Justice ; 79: 101884, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650023

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The present study examines how varying levels of restrictions on the nightlife economy have impacted violent crime during the COVID-19 pandemic and the extent to which the crime preventive side-effects of restrictions are associated with the density of alcohol outlets. METHODS: The Data stems from geocoded locations of violent crimes combined with data on the density of on-premises alcohol outlets and the level of COVID-19 restrictions in Copenhagen, Denmark. We use a negative binomial count model with cluster robust standard error to assess the effect of the interaction between alcohol outlet density and COVID-related restriction levels on the nightlife economy on the frequency of violent crime. RESULTS: The article reveals how both the level of restrictions on the nightlife economy and the density of alcohol outlets significantly impacted the frequency of violent crime. The regression analysis shows that the effect of restrictions on the nightlife economy depends on the concentration of on-premises alcohol outlets in the area. In areas with a high concentration of outlets, we observe a much higher reduction in crime as consequence of the COVID-19 related restrictions. CONCLUSIONS: The results shows that a more restricted nightlife economy, including earlier closing times, could have a crime preventive effect, especially in areas with a high density of alcohol outlets.

10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 Jan 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1648544

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of non-specific symptoms of "long-COVID syndrome" depending on the physical activity undertaken resulting from the imposed forms of study (distance learning-contact learning); 136 men aged 21.5 ± 1.58 from universities educating students of medical faculties were examined. The difference between the universities was mainly due to the nature of the classes undertaken (classes remotely-hybrid form) in the period from March 2020 to February 2021. Among the respondents, 17% in Group I and 16% in Group II were infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, including 50% in Group I with moderate symptoms, and in Group II-most people 45% with mild symptoms. The conducted research clearly shows the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on students. They show a number of important problems, such as reduced physical activity, as well as increased body weight and time spent in front of the monitor. They also make it clear that the health consequences of the pandemic affect both people who were infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus and those who did not suffer from this infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Exercise , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
11.
Clin Pediatr (Phila) ; 61(1): 22-25, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607391

ABSTRACT

To combat the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), significant measures were enacted including school and business closures, social distancing, and facial coverings. We hypothesized that this would have an impact on all respiratory infections in children. Using nasopharyngeal panel test results of children in the emergency department, we evaluated cross-sectional data from February to May in both 2019 and 2020. Respiratory panel testing included 11 common respiratory viruses and bacteria. After the restrictions were enacted, we observed a large drop in the number and percentage positive of all common respiratory viral infections in 2020 compared with the same time in 2019. When analyzing data from children <2 years old, a similar decrease was seen. Restrictions enacted to prevent the spread of COVID-19 were associated with a significant decrease in respiratory viral infections in children of all ages. This association could guide future public health recommendations and guidelines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Quarantine/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Quarantine/methods , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies
12.
J Health Psychol ; : 13591053211062351, 2021 Dec 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566471

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to increased levels of stress and alcohol consumption. This study examined the effect of resilience on the relationship between stress and changes in alcohol consumption in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020. A cross-sectional survey of 502 adults in Queensland, Australia (mean age = 45.68 (16.61)), found 23.9% of individuals had increased their alcohol consumption since the start of the pandemic. Regression modelling demonstrated a significant association between perceived stress and change in alcohol consumption. The study also revealed resilience was a moderating factor, where high levels of resilience buffered against increases in alcohol consumption associated with stress during the COVID-19 pandemic.

13.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 2202-2204, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488140

ABSTRACT

Incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) has been low during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, we found that the IPD numbers again increased in Switzerland during the first six months of 2021 and that this coincides with the loosening of COVID-19 measures. Vaccine pneumococcal serotypes have continued to decrease and non-vaccine type serotype 23B has emerged (8% of the isolates in 2021). Worryingly, serotype 23B is associated with reduced susceptibility to penicillin.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Pneumococcal Infections/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Streptococcus pneumoniae/classification , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Humans , Pneumococcal Infections/microbiology , Pneumococcal Vaccines/immunology , Serotyping , Streptococcus pneumoniae/drug effects , Switzerland/epidemiology
14.
Public Health Rev ; 42: 1604269, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485135

ABSTRACT

Background: When vaccines became first available during the Covid-19 pandemic, their demand significantly exceeded their supply. In consequence, the access to vaccines, initially, was distributed unequally. At the same time, governments started easing pandemic restrictions for vaccinated and recovered persons and restoring their freedoms since their risk of transmitting the virus is significantly reduced. Evidence: We show that restoring freedoms for vaccinated and recovered persons - while upholding restrictions for the rest of the population - is morally unfair during vaccine scarcity. Further, it may yield unintended side-effects, including perverse incentives, growing rifts in society, and the expansion of marginalization. Policy Options & Recommendations: We recommend accompanying easing for vaccinated and recovered individuals by mitigation measures for those who are neither vaccinated nor recovered. We propose, first, to temporarily lift the same restrictions for negative-tested individuals, as for vaccinated or recovered people. Second, the state must ensure broad and easy access to testing for everyone - free of charge. Conclusion: If done right, these mitigation measures create (at least temporarily) equal access to freedom for everybody - solving the moral problem of unfair access to freedoms and counteracting possible negative consequences.

15.
Front Psychol ; 12: 729774, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468368

ABSTRACT

A central feature of the Covid-19 pandemic is state differences. Some state Governors closed all but essential businesses, others did not. In some states, most of the population wore face coverings when in public; in other states, <50% wore face coverings. According to journalists, these differences were symptomatic of a politically polarized America. The Big 5 personality factors also cluster at the state level. For example, residents of Utah score high on Conscientiousness and low on Neuroticism, whereas residents of Massachusetts and Connecticut show the opposite pattern. In state-level regressions that controlled for partisan political allegiances, Conscientiousness was a significant (negative) predictor of the stringency of state Covid-19 restrictions, whereas Openness was a significant (positive) predictor of mask wearing. A number of the predictors were strongly correlated with each other. For example, the correlation coefficient linking Openness with the percentage of Democratic state legislators was r = 0.53. Commonality regression partitions the explained variance between the amount that is unique to each predictor and the amount that is shared among subsets of correlated predictors. This approach revealed that the common variance shared by Conscientiousness, Openness and partisan politics accounted for 34% of the state differences in Covid-19 policy and 35% of the state differences in mask wearing. The results reflect the importance of personality in how Americans have responded to the Covid-19 pandemic.

16.
Air Qual Atmos Health ; 15(2): 221-234, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1446227

ABSTRACT

This study examines the regional impact of the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions on pollution in Ireland by comparing the 2020 measurements of ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and particulate matter (PM) from monitoring stations around the country to the previous 3-year average. Results indicate that O3 was 5.6% lower and 13.7% higher than previous years during the lockdown at rural and suburban sites, respectively. NO2 decreased by 50.7% in urban areas, but increased slightly in agricultural regions, consistent with satellite observations. PM concentrations did not change significantly compared to previous years; however, a reduction in the signal variability in the smaller size particle measurements may be the result of different emission sources. The reduction in NO2 likely increased the ratio of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to NOx (nitrogen oxides), creating a NOx limited environment, which resulted in an initial increase in O3 in suburban areas, and the lower than usual levels observed at rural sites. Meteorology showed higher than average wind speeds prior to lockdown, which likely acted to disperse PM and NO2.

17.
BMC Neurol ; 21(1): 332, 2021 Aug 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379784

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The consequences of strict COVID-19 mobility restrictions on motor/non-motor features in Parkinson's disease (PD) have not been systematically studied but worse mobility and quality of life have been reported. To elucidate this question, 12 mild to moderate PD patients were assessed in March 2020 before and after two months of isolation as part of a clinical study that had to be interrupted due to the pandemic and the implementation of COVID19 mobility restrictions. METHODS: Twelve patients were systematically evaluated before and after the lockdown period as part of a larger cohort that previously underwent thermal water rehabilitation. Clinical outcomes were the Body Mass index, the Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test, the MDS-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III, the 6 Minute Walking Test and the New Freezing of Gait Questionnaire. Global cognition was evaluated with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment scale. The impact of COVID-19 restrictions on quality of life and functional independence was evaluated with The Parkinson's disease Quality of life (PDQ-39), the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living questionnaires (IADL) and the Parkinson's disease cognitive functional rating scales (PD-CFRS). RESULTS: After two months of isolation the Mini-BESTest score worsened (p=0.005), and four patients reported one or more falls during the lockdown. BMI increased (p=0.031) while the remaining clinical variables including quality of life did not change. CONCLUSION: We observed moderate worsening at Mini-BESTest, greater risk of falls and increased body weight as consequence of prolonged immobility. We believe negative effects were partially softened since patients were in contact with our multidisciplinary team during the lockdown and had previously received training to respond to the needs of this emergency isolation. These findings highligh the importnace of patient-centered interventions in PD management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gait Disorders, Neurologic , Mobility Limitation , Parkinson Disease , Accidental Falls , Activities of Daily Living , Communicable Disease Control , Gait Disorders, Neurologic/etiology , Humans , Male , Parkinson Disease/complications , Quality of Life , Risk , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Animals (Basel) ; 11(9)2021 Aug 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374262

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has an indirect impact on the health and welfare of animals. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of COVID-19 on Municipal and Association animal shelters. A questionnaire was sent to 97 Municipal shelters and 65 Associations. Questions focused on public funding, management and animal welfare during COVID-19 restrictions. The response rate was 43.3% (42/97) for Municipal shelters and 38.5% (25/65) for Associations. Municipal shelters (67%) received over 80% of public funding, whereas 68% of the Associations received less than 50%. During the COVID-19 restrictions, financial difficulties were observed by 52% of Associations and 5% of Municipal shelters, and a lack of volunteers was observed by 56% of Associations and 17% of Municipal shelters. Operational difficulties were indicated by 43% of Associations and 12% of Municipal shelters, and a lack of instructions was observed by 31% of Municipal shelters and 4% of Associations. No significant differences were obtained on abandonment, adoption, clinical support, exercise and interaction. Decreased feed supply was reported by 40% of Associations and 5% of Municipal shelters. During the COVID-19 restrictions, Municipal shelters were more affected by the lack of instructions, and Associations were more affected by external factors such as a decrease in feed supply, volunteers and funding. Preparedness and contingency plans seem essential to face unpredicted crises.

19.
J Dev Phys Disabil ; : 1-12, 2021 Jul 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330390

ABSTRACT

This study assessed the potential short-term effects of COVID-19 stay-at-home restrictions on ratings of ASD and comorbid symptoms severity and adaptive functioning of 69 youth, ages 8-16 years with ASD without intellectual disability. Parent/caregiver ratings were being collected in fall and spring over approximately two years when the restrictions were imposed four months prior to the final data collection point. Results indicated no significant changes in parent/caregiver ratings of ASD symptom severity, comorbid symptoms severity, social skills, or adaptive behaviors following the stay-at-home restrictions and little variability across the four data collection points. Although findings suggested minimal short-term effects on these symptoms and adaptive skills, ongoing monitoring is needed to assess longer-term impacts.

20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(15)2021 Jul 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325659

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study is to assess the impact of changes in daily physical activity during the blockade (March 2020-February 2021) on the mass and segmental composition of the body of young people. Material and research methods: In total, 120 people from the sports and medical university aged 19.8 (±0.8) years, average height 173.2 (±9.2) cm, body mass 66.1 (±12.8), and BMI 19.2 (±5.9) kg/m2. The research was carried out in two stages. The total and segmental body mass of the respondents and the change in physical activity during the pandemic were assessed twice (December 2019, February 2021). There was a statistically significant increase in body mass in men, an increase in total fat mass in women, and statistically significant changes in the distribution of fat mass in both sexes. Conclusions: In the studied group, there was a change in the forms of physical activity from strength and group activity to endurance activity (running forms, cycling.) and individual activity. The subjects showed a statistically significant increase in body fat, regardless of gender, and in the upper limbs in men.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Running , Adolescent , Body Composition , Body Mass Index , Exercise , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
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