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1.
Tijdschrift voor Psychiatrie ; 63(11):771-774, 2021.
Article in Dutch | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1989855

ABSTRACT

Background: Psychiatric patients have an increased risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2 and morbidity and mortality rates are higher. Willingness to get vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2 may be less compared to the general population. Aims: To gain more knowledge about the willingness to be vaccinated and about underlying arguments among clinical psychiatric patients. Method: We submitted a questionnaire to clinical psychiatric patients, in which we assessed the willingness to be vaccinated and presented a number of statements about vaccination. Results: In total, 70 patients were invited to participate in this study of which 56 patients (80%) completed the questionnaires. The willingness to be vaccinated was 63%. Of the 56 patients included, 5 indicated to have had SARS-CoV-2 (9%) and 16 patients (29%) had been vaccinated. Patients who refused vaccination reported being afraid of side effects of the vaccine (28%) and long-term effects of vaccination on their health (25%). Furthermore, patients found it complicated to make a vaccination appointment. Conclusion: In this study the willingness to be vaccinated appears to be low. We recommend on the basis of this study that in order to improve the vaccination coverage among psychiatric patients, more attention should be paid to vaccination in the psychiatric wards. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved) (Dutch) Achtergrond: Psychiatrische patienten hebben een verhoogd risico op infectie met het SARS-CoV-2 en bij infectie een hogere morbiditeit en mortaliteit. De SARS-CoV-2-vaccinatiebereidheid binnen deze groep is mogelijk lager in vergelijking met de algemene bevolking. Doel Inzicht verkrijgen in de drempels tot vaccinatie onder kortdurend opgenomen patienten in een psychiatrisch ziekenhuis en exploreren van de achterliggende attitudes en belemmeringen. Methode: Bij opgenomen patienten binnen de specialistische ggz namen we een vragenlijst af waarin we de vaccinatiebereidheid en een aantal stellingen hierover uitvroegen. Resultaten: In totaal werd 70 patienten gevraagd mee te doen aan het onderzoek, van wie 56 patienten (80%) de vragenlijsten invulden. De vaccinatiebereidheid binnen deze populatie was 63%. Van de 56 geincludeerde patienten gaven 5 aan COVID-19 te hebben gehad (9%) en 16 patienten (29%) hadden zich laten vaccineren. Verder bleek dat patienten die vaccinatie weigerden met name bang waren voor de bijwerkingen (28%) en langetermijngevolgen (25%). Ook hadden patienten moeite om een vaccinatieafspraak te regelen. Conclusie: De vaccinatiebereidheid onder de onderzochte patienten blijkt laag te zijn. Op basis van deze bevindingen bevelen we aan meer aandacht te besteden aan vaccinatie op de afdelingen, teneinde de vaccinatiegraad onder kortdurend opgenomen psychiatrische patienten te vergroten. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

2.
Int Marit Health ; 73(2): 59-63, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1924553

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused many seafarers to be stranded on their ships due to lack of access to a vaccine and fear of contracting the COVID-19 virus limiting their ability to work on the ship. Once COVID-19 vaccinations were available, a lack of access to the vaccine continued to exist in the underserved seafarer population. This lack of access to the COVID-19 vaccine meant that seafarers were sometimes unable to leave their ships for months beyond their original contracts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The University of South Florida (USF) College of Nursing collaborated with the USF Morsani Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy in the development and implementation of an onboard COVID-19 vaccination programme at the request of the Port of Tampa Ministries. RESULTS: In 6 months, 1237 seafarers from 30 countries and 5 continents received the COVID-19 vaccination as a result of this programme. CONCLUSIONS: Partnership between a commercial port and a College of Nursing at a local university enabled hundreds of seafarers to be vaccinated against COVID-19. This programme serves as a model for industry and academic partnerships that can have a global impact on health and wellness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Humans , Ships , Universities , Vaccination
3.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 66: 104033, 2022 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1914839

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The impact of COVID-19 infection and the effect of COVID-19 vaccinations on patients with demyelinating central nervous system disease in low middle income countries (LMIC's) have not been reported in detail earlier. We sought to identify risk factors associated with COVID-19 infection and the role of vaccination in order to develop management guidelines relevant to our patients. METHODS: A total of 621 patients from our registry that included 297 MS and 324 non MS disorders (Aquaporin- 4 antibody positive [50], Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody positive [81], seronegative [162] and clinically isolated syndrome [31]) were contacted. COVID-19 infection and vaccination status were queried. Patients who self reported COVID-19 infection based on a positive RT PCR report were compared with non infected patients to identify factors associated with susceptibility for COVID-19 infection. Univariate and multivariate analysis of potential risk factors included demographic and clinical features, body mass index (BMI), presence of comorbidities, absolute lymphocyte count, treatment types and vaccination status. RESULTS: Sixty seven patients with MS and 27 with non MS disorders developed COVID-19 infection. Among them 81 patients had mild infection and remained quarantined at home. All 13 patients who needed hospitalization recovered. Vaccination status was known in 582 patients among whom 69.8% had completed or taken one dose of vaccine at the time of inquiry. Majority of treated patients (61.3%) were on nonspecific immunosuppressants. In univariate analysis, presence of ≥1 comorbidity was significantly associated with COVID-19 infection in both MS (p value 0.01, OR-2.28, 95%CI- 1.18-4.4) and non MS patients (p- 0.001, OR-4.4, 95% CI-1.88-10.24). In the latter, BMI ≥ 30 (p-0.04, OR-3.27, 95% CI- 0.98-10.87) and EDSS score ≥ 3 (p-0.02, OR- 2.59,95% CI- 1.08-6.23) were other significant associations. History of prior COVID-19 vaccination was associated with reduced frequency of COVID-19 infection among MS (p- 0.001,OR- 0.24,95% CI- 0.13-0.43) and non MS patients (p- 0.0001,OR-0.14, 95% CI- 0.058-0.35). In multivariate analysis presence of comorbidities significantly increased and prior vaccination significantly reduced frequency of COVID-19 infection for both MS and related disorders. Concurrent disease modifying treatments showed a trend for association with infection. In the unvaccinated group, patients on disease modifying treatment were significantly at risk of infection, 81.5% unvaccinated and treated versus 18.5% who were unvaccinated and untreated (p- 0.0001, OR-10.1, 95% CI-0.56-2.11). CONCLUSION: Frequency and severity of COVID-19 infection was low among our patient cohort. Higher rate of infection in the treated group was significantly seen among unvaccinated patients. Our preliminary results suggests that in LMIC's, where "off label therapies" with inexpensive immunosuppressives are the main disease modifying drugs, mRNA vaccinations appear safe and effective against severe COVID-19 infection.

4.
Soc Sci Med ; 305: 115072, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1867786

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has affected countries and regions to varying degrees. In this paper, I examine the socioeconomic determinants of Covid-19 mortality and study whether vaccinations have affected the relationship between those determinants and Covid-19 mortality rates across local areas in England. I use monthly data for 6791 Middle Layer Super Output Areas for the period from March 2020 to April 2021 and estimate a spatial correlations model with local authority and time fixed effects. To study whether vaccinations have affected the relationship between socioeconomic determinants and Covid-19 mortality, I extend the model to include interactions between socioeconomic variables and the lagged cumulative vaccination rate. I find that Covid-19 mortality is higher in areas that have an older population, a larger share of Asian population, higher population density, lower income, poorer pre-existing health and a larger share of employment in health and social care occupations. Vaccinations have weakened the links between mortality and these socioeconomic characteristics. These findings highlight the importance of making vaccines widely available and encouraging take-up, to reduce inequality in Covid-19 mortality across socioeconomic groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , England/epidemiology , Humans , Mortality , Pandemics , Socioeconomic Factors , Vaccination
5.
Environ Res ; 213: 113566, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1867128

ABSTRACT

In the presence of pandemic threats, such as Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) crisis, vaccination is one of the fundamental strategies to cope with negative effects of new viral agents in society. The rollout of vast vaccination campaigns also generates the main issue of hesitancy and resistance to vaccines in a share of people. Many studies have investigated how to reduce the social resistance to vaccinations, however the maximum level of vaccinable people against COVID-19 (and in general against pandemic diseases), without coercion in countries, is unknown. The goal of this study is to solve the problem here by developing an empirical analysis, based on global data, to estimate the max share of people vaccinable in relation to socioeconomic wellbeing of nations. Results, based on 150 countries, reveal that vaccinations increase with the income per capita, achieving the maximum share of about 70% of total population, without coercion. This information can provide new knowledge to establish the appropriate goal of vaccination campaigns and in general of health policies to cope with next pandemic impacts, without restrictions that create socioeconomic problems. Overall, then, nations have a natural level of max vaccinable people (70% of population), but strict policies and mandates to achieve 90% of vaccinated population can reduce the quality of democracy and generate socioeconomic issues higher than (pandemic) crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Democracy , Health Policy , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Vaccination
6.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(12)2021 Dec 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1614017

ABSTRACT

Mass immunization of the citizens of the Republic of Serbia began in January 2021. Information on the significance, manner, advantages and consequences of this process was intensively distributed through all communication channels, with the media playing a key role. According to the data of the official institutions for the public health of Serbia, by July 2021 the lowest percentage of vaccinated population was among those between the ages of 18 and 24-only 15% of this demographic had received the vaccine by this point. Given the low turnout of young people for vaccination, in this paper we investigated the general attitude of students in Serbia, as a special category of young people, towards the vaccine against the COVID-19 virus, as well as their attitude regarding information about vaccination in the media. Research was conducted on a sample of 345 students at the University of Novi Sad. The results of the research showed that 42% of students had not been vaccinated and did not plan to do so, 37.4% had received at least one dose of vaccine and 20.6% had not been vaccinated even though they planned to do so. Students who were vaccinated had more confidence in information provided through media channels than those who were not vaccinated. Therefore, it can be concluded that encouraging students to decide in favor of vaccination against the COVID-19 virus should come from the universities where they study as well as the media.

7.
Saudi Med J ; 42(12): 1341-1352, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547838

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To identify the self-reported vaccine-related side effects among healthcare professionals (HCPs) in the Jazan province, Saudi Arabia, and determine the associated socio-demographic factors. With the recent second and third waves of coronavirus disease -19 (COVID-19) infections worldwide, the race is not only to encourage but also to achieve mass vaccination. METHODS: A total of 397 HCPs from across Jazan province participated in an anonymous online cross-sectional survey conducted for a period of 45 days (March 30, 2021 to May 13, 2021) in Jazan province, Saudi Arabia. Data was collected using a validated 22-items self-report survey. RESULTS: For both COVID-19 vaccines, majority of reports were related to flu-like symptoms including fever, chills, headache, fatigue, tiredness, and myalgia. Statistically significant associations were observed between the severity of side effects and gender (χ2=73.32; p<0.001), type of vaccine (χ2=112.08; p<0.001), and presence of known allergies (χ2=99.69; p<0.001). Female HCPs were more likely to report any side effects compared with male HCPs (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 3.72; p<0.001). Furthermore, HCPs with known allergies were more likely to report any side effects than their counterparts with unknown allergies (AOR: 16.29; p<0.001). CONCLUSION: The findings of the present study would help in designing educational programs aimed at combating the misconstrued fear of vaccination and highlighting the urgent need of getting vaccinated. This study also helps in the identification of factors affecting the presence and severity of side effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Vaccination
8.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(10)2021 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444341

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has been spreading worldwide since late 2019. There is no definitive cure to date. Global vaccination programs are urgently required to confer herd immunity, reducing the incidence of COVID-19 infections and associated morbidity and mortality. However, a significant proportion of special populations are hesitant to receive vaccination due to their special conditions, namely, age (pediatrics and geriatrics), immunocompromised state, autoimmune diseases, chronic cardiovascular and pulmonary conditions, active or treated cancers, and pregnancy. This review aims to evaluate the existing evidence of COVID-19 vaccinations on these special populations and to provide clues to guide vaccination decision making to balance the benefits and risks of vaccinations.

9.
Health Serv Insights ; 14: 11786329211042769, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405283

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The distribution and vaccination of COVID-19 vaccines to billions of people worldwide will likely be one of the biggest public health undertakings in history. There has been a large focus on identifying processes to safely, efficiently, and effectively vaccinate large populations. We aimed to describe the development and operationalization of a drive-in COVID-19 vaccine site in a parking garage adjacent to outpatient clinics at University of Florida (UF) Health Physicians and how it was informed by the roll-out of SARS-CoV-2 testing and administration of respiratory vaccinations. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: A technical description and analysis of a drive-in COVID-19 vaccine site. FINDINGS: We incrementally increased the number of vaccines performed per day from 300 in the first 2 weeks to 700 an additional 2 weeks later. By the end of January, we completed nearly 14 000 vaccinations. At this capacity, we estimate the site could performed 5000 vaccinations per week. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: This manuscript provides step-by-step guidance how to develop, operationalize, and implement a sustainable drive-in COVID-19 vaccination site. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: To our knowledge, this is the first description of a drive-in approach to COVID-19 vaccination. Our findings can help inform other health entities as they develop or expand vaccination efforts that may serve as a template for other sites to adapt.

10.
Inflamm Res ; 70(9): 935-937, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355995

ABSTRACT

We report a case of itchy papulovesicular rash consistent with varicella-zoster virus reactivation after Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine second dose administration. While there have been cases of varicella-zoster virus reactivation due to COVID-19 or COVID-19 vaccine inoculation in older individuals with pre-existing conditions, this case report describes the first case of varicella-zoster virus reactivation on a healthy, young male in the absence of pre-existing conditions. The mechanisms underlying varicella-zoster virus reactivation in patients with COVID-19 are unknown and should be further characterized.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Chickenpox/etiology , Chickenpox/virology , Herpesvirus 3, Human , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Chickenpox/pathology , Humans , Male , Skin/pathology , Vaccination/adverse effects
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