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1.
Routledge international handbook of therapeutic stories and storytelling ; : 43-44, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-20245505

ABSTRACT

This chapter is about, what impact can the corona crisis have on our mental health? Besides the relational tensions that can arise from living on top of each other, many of us are also stuck in one negative story. The chapter is about the importance making room for stories that are not about corona. It discusses about work that consisting of broadening people's horizon by letting participants discover that they consist of multiple stories. This will have an enormous impact on the mental well-being of a large part of the population, which will have lots of consequences. That is why it is important to actively make room for other stories right now, in the middle of the pandemic. Memories from the past and dreams for the future. This is a responsibility one has to take towards one's own mental health (and resilience), just as we have to do for others. Sharing other stories and making sure people don't get stuck in that one difficult story is just as much part of caring about each other and will help us get through this crisis healthier. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

2.
Sustain Prod Consum ; 26: 770-781, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20231941

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has emerged as one of the deadliest infectious diseases on the planet. Millions of people and businesses have been placed in lockdown where the main aim is to stop the spread of the virus. As an extreme phenomenon, the lockdown has triggered a global economic shock at an alarming pace, conveying sharp recessions for many countries. In the meantime, the lockdowns caused by the COVID-19 pandemic have drastically changed energy consumption patterns and reduced CO2 emissions throughout the world. Recent data released by the International Monetary Fund and International Energy Agency for 2020 further forecast that emissions will rebound in 2021. Still, the full impact of COVID-19 in terms of how long the crisis will be and how the consumption pattern of energy and the associated levels of CO2 emissions will be affected are unclear. This review aims to steer policymakers and governments of nations toward a better direction by providing a broad and convincing overview on the observed and likely impacts of the pandemic of COVID-19 on the world economy, world energy demand, and world energy-related CO2 emissions that may well emerge in the next few years. Indeed, given that immediate policy responses are required with equal urgency to address three things-pandemic, economic downturn, and climate crisis. This study outlines policy suggestions that can be used during these uncertain times as a guide.

3.
International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy ; 13(3):56-60, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20245430

ABSTRACT

Recent years have been times of crisis triggered by the Covid-19 pandemic and the Russian attack on Ukraine. Energy markets have seen dynamic increases in commodity prices, which have continued to this day. The prices of oil, whose rise fuels inflation are particularly important for the world economy. The paper presents an overview and per-prospects for the development of transport in Poland during the energy crisis and the Covid-19 pandemic. The analysis carried out on the example of Poland clearly shows that in the near term there is no chance to reduce fuel prices in Poland, which would result in a decrease in transport costs. It seems that the only chance for companies to reduce transport costs is to change their supply and inventory management strategies to take advantage of economies of scale and maintain high inventory levels. On the other hand, in world markets, oil prices will fall only if the war in Ukraine finishes. © 2023, Econjournals. All rights reserved.

4.
Social Science Computer Review ; 41(3):790-811, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-20245295

ABSTRACT

The U.S. confronts an unprecedented public health crisis, the COVID-19 pandemic, in the presidential election year in 2020. In such a compound situation, a real-time dynamic examination of how the general public ascribe the crisis responsibilities taking account to their political ideologies is helpful for developing effective strategies to manage the crisis and diminish hostility toward particular groups caused by polarization. Social media, such as Twitter, provide platforms for the public's COVID-related discourse to form, accumulate, and visibly present. Meanwhile, those features also make social media a window to monitor the public responses in real-time. This research conducted a computational text analysis of 2,918,376 tweets sent by 829,686 different U.S. users regarding COVID-19 from January 24 to May 25, 2020. Results indicate that the public's crisis attribution and attitude toward governmental crisis responses are driven by their political identities. One crisis factor identified by this study (i.e., threat level) also affects the public's attribution and attitude polarization. Additionally, we note that pandemic fatigue was identified in our findings as early as in March 2020. This study has theoretical, practical, and methodological implications informing further health communication in a heated political environment. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Social Science Computer Review is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

5.
The Routledge international handbook of community psychology: Facing global crises with hope ; : 91-105, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-20245193

ABSTRACT

The social outbreak that occurred in Chile in October 2019, added to the COVID-19 pandemic, has made visible and exacerbated inequities of all kinds in the country (health, work, housing, education etc). This has resulted in the activation of various social and community processes that try to reverse situations of injustice and also to subvert the economic and social logic that has led us to this situation. In this scenario, the question arises, what can Chilean Community Psychology contribute to this crisis? An attempt is made to answer this question in this chapter, which addresses, from an integrated perspective, the various alternatives that our discipline has to contribute to this process of social transformation. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved) (Spanish) El estallido social que se produjo en Chile en octubre de 2019, sumado a la pandemia por COVID-19, ha hecho visibles y ha agudizado las inequidades de todo tipo en el pais (salud, trabajo, vivienda, educacion, etc.). Lo anterior ha tenido como consecuencia la activacion de diversos procesos sociales y comunitarios que intentan, por un lado, revertir las situaciones de injusticia y, por otro, subvertir la logica economica y social que nos ha llevado a esta situacion. En este escenario surge la pregunta: ?que puede aportar la psicologia comunitaria chilena en esta crisis? A esta interrogante se intenta dar respuesta en este capitulo que aborda desde una mirada integrada las diversas alternativas que tiene nuestra disciplina para aportar a este proceso de transformacion social. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

6.
Geo-Economy of the Future: Sustainable Agriculture and Alternative Energy: Volume II ; 2:699-715, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20245161

ABSTRACT

The study aims to identify the problems of economic security of the Russian regions under the influence of force majeure caused by the pandemic COVID-19 and their assessment, as well as to determine ways to stabilize the socio-economic situation. The authors conducted a grouping of the economic security indicators of the federal districts and proposed a methodology for its assessment in terms of the coronavirus pandemic. The authors identified the problem areas of socio-economic development of the Russian regions and also proved the decline in their economic security during the pandemic. The authors evaluated the effectiveness of the internal state administration of the federal districts according to the anti-crisis measures adopted in 2020 (maintaining turnover in the main regional segments of the economy, avoiding tax debt on regional fees, increasing the profitability of the real business, raising the level of digital development), as well as measures to preserve employment and solvency of the population of each region. The authors justified the directions of normalization of the socio-economic development of the federal districts of Russia by eliminating the economic security problems. © The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2022.

7.
SEARCH Journal of Media and Communication Research ; 2023(Special Issue):17-32, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20245111

ABSTRACT

While social media has grown in popularity in today's society, and has facilitated the dissemination of accurate and valuable information, it also raises the equally pressing concern of rampant proliferation of rumors and false news. The recent global outbreak of COVID-19 witnessed the explosion of fake and misleading health rumors in social media. Governments are tasked with providing the public with the right information to influence their behavior and engagement in emergency decision-making and optimally address the risks of rumor influence. Therefore, it is important to choose an appropriate response strategy in a rumor-induced health crisis. This study has two main objectives: to identify effective rumor response strategies by the government to stem the spread of rumor during a health crisis, and to examine the role of anxiety in this process using the Situational Crisis Communication Theory (SCCT). Online quasi-experimental data was collected from 245 Chinese participants who were exposed to a false social media rumor that potato chips could spread COVID-19 and were randomly assigned to one of three rumor response strategies (denial, refute or attack). According to the one-way ANOVA results, the effect of the refute response on rumor-related behavior is the most positive, whereas the effects of denial and attack are not significantly different. The results of the mediation model using PROCESS Macro reveal that anxiety partially mediates the relationship between rumor response strategies and rumor-related behaviors (rumor dissemination intentions and behavior intention to consume products);the refute strategy reduces public anxiety and has a positive effect on public behavioral intentions. This study is relevant to COVID-19 rumor research with regard to government rumor response strategies on social media using data-based descriptive and quantitative analysis. © SEARCH Journal 2023.

8.
Cultura-International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology ; 20(1):149-161, 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-20245034

ABSTRACT

Over the recent years, some authors have questioned the hegemony of mankind (Anthropocene) over nature. The recent virus outbreak known as COVID19 starts a new period known as "violence" where humans are forced to recede to the private sphere. The COVID19 pandemic not only alerted the health authorities but also disposed of extreme measures which included the close of borders, airspaces, as well as the imposition of lockdown and social distancing. Not only global commerce but also the tourism industry was placed on the brink of collapse. In this grim landscape, the problem of climate change is far from being solved. While steps to reverse the greenhouse gas emission should be taken globally coordinating efforts among nations, the current climate of tension without mentioning the geopolitical discrepancies (among countries) impedes the formation of global sustainable institutions to monitor and regulate the effects of climate change. The present article centers on a visual ethnography on the film Contagion, to lay the foundations towards a new understanding of ideology and its effects on ecological justice.

9.
Japanese Studies ; : 1-18, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-20245023

ABSTRACT

It has been observed that ‘3–11' marked an inflection point in Japanese cultural discourse, after which there prevailed a broad malaise about the social faults and systemic inequities that the natural and nuclear disasters had exposed in their aftermath. Kanehara Hitomi's novel Motazaru Mono (Those without, 2015) explores this affective shift through her characters' struggles to contend with the upending of their worldviews and values since 2011. In turn, Kanehara's stories written during the COVID-19 pandemic's peak of 2020–2021 show characters responding to the global crisis through the lens of a generalized state of precarity that, I argue, harkens back to 3–11 and earlier. With reference to Lauren Berlant's notion of the ‘crisis ordinary' mentality, I analyze ‘Unsocial Distance' (June 2020), a love story between two youths who regard COVID-19 as an inconvenience rather than a true emergency. I then examine ‘Techno-break' (January 2021) which ends with the protagonist's mental and moral devolution in the socially distanced solitude she first enters as an anti-COVID measure. ‘Techno-break' advocates for confronting the tolls of the prolonged pandemic, and for addressing the deeper-seeded fault-lines of Japanese society that contribute to more recent challenges. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Japanese Studies is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

10.
Chinese Journal of Psychiatry ; 54(3):239-242, 2021.
Article in Chinese | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20244986

ABSTRACT

Three patients diagnosed with COVID-19 were all young women in their thirties who have suffered from Internet violence in their personal life after hospitalization. They showed significant emotional distress such as, depression state, acute stress disorder, and dissociative disorder. The current study adopts short-term, individualized and comprehensive psychological interventions, including psychological support, encouragement, listening, safety confirmation, catharsis, psychological suggestion, and stimulation of internal potential to treat patients. The third case was provided with psychological interventions combined with antipsychotic treatment. After timely psychological interventions all three patients achieved sound results.Copyright © 2021 Chinese Medical Journals Publishing House Co.Ltd.

11.
International Journal of Hospitality Management ; 95:1-11, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-20244845

ABSTRACT

Implicit psychological contract (PC) represents the dynamic employee-employer relationship, and unlike explicit human resource (HR) practices, PC is an underexplored topic in the crisis management literature. By capturing the dual perspective of hotel employers and employees through interviews, this study investigates the content of PCs and breaches of PCs during the COVID-19 pandemic crisis. The study identifies salient dimensions of employer obligations such as safety assurance and of employee obligations such as personal protection. While employees emphasized the transactional contracts to protect their individual interests, the employers tried to balance the transactional and relational contracts. The study proposes a dynamic PC breach model that indicates contract breaches lead to varied responses through a complex interpretation process. In general, the study suggests that ensuring mutual consideration is the best way for hotel employees and employers to pull through a crisis. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

12.
Journal of Urban Regeneration and Renewal ; 16(4):375-384, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244544

ABSTRACT

This paper explores the key principles of economic development in a pandemic. It does so by drawing on the lessons learned through the economic response to the COVID-19 pandemic in the Australian city of Melbourne. Melburnians experienced 263 days largely confined to their homes, one of the longest lockdown periods in the world, resulting in deserted city streets and a devastated central city economy. The experience forced the City of Melbourne to adopt a range of unique and innovative responses, first to keep businesses afloat during lockdown, and then to reactivate the city. Melbourne did this while keeping a focus on longer-term economic development. This somewhat unique experience makes Melbourne a useful case study informing best-practice economic development in a pandemic. Key lessons emerging from Melbourne's experience include the need to respond and iterate rapidly, the importance of collaboration with stakeholders and other tiers of government, and the need to maintain a focus on multiple time horizons, even in the midst of the crisis. These insights are potentially transferrable to economic development responses to other crises, including those catalysed by climate change. © 2023, Henry Stewart Publications. All rights reserved.

13.
Teaching in the Post COVID-19 Era: World Education Dilemmas, Teaching Innovations and Solutions in the Age of Crisis ; : 575-583, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244418

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, the recent health threat that affected almost every part of the world, has had a huge impact on education and educators. While many researchers devoted their attention to exploring ways through which teachers and students could be supported at the time of a pandemic, this paper focuses on a different population: educational leaders. Effective educational leadership at the time of crisis is crucial not only because of its big impact and magnitude but also because it sets an example for how similar situations could be handled in the future. In this paper, the researcher first looks at the qualities and capacities needed of leaders at the time of emergency. She also discusses the need for educational contingency planning and crisis preparedness. Attention is then shifted to handling future crises and emergencies by shedding light on leadership essentials that school and district administrators should be equipped to handle. The paper ends by proposing some recommendations for leader preparation programs so that aspiring leaders are ready to deal with similar situations in the future. © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2021. All rights reserved.

14.
Proceedings of the European Conference on Management, Leadership and Governance ; 2022-November:423-430, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244396

ABSTRACT

Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, 2021 saw a growing interest in starting own business: as per the Census Bureau's Business Formation Statistics, the number of applications to form new businesses filed in the U.S. was the highest compared to any other year on record, reaching the total of 5.4 million (Economic Innovation Group, 2022), while in the EU, after an initial downward trend recorded in the first and second quarters of 2020, the number of new business registrations grew again in the third quarter of that year, and this upward trend continued throughout 2021 (Eurostat, 2022). Of course, as a result of Russia's invasion on Ukraine and related economic crisis, a downward tendency could be observed, but business registration levels in the EU in the first quarter of 2022 were still higher than during the pre-COVID 19 pandemic period (2015-2019) (Eurostat, 2022) and online searches indicating and intent to open a business spiked by 76% from 2018 to 2022 (Search Engine Journal, 2022). This shows that despite many external impediments, people are still tempted to start their own business, and many influencers, motivational speakers and coaches, as well as various popular TV shows broadcast worldwide (like the Apprentice, Dragons' Den, Shark Tank or Planet of the Apps) encourage them to do so. Becoming an entrepreneur has become a goal many people, especially 20-, 30- and 40-year-olds, strive to achieve. However, many of those people fail to realise that the very entry in the business register does not automatically make them entrepreneurs or their business successful. Neither does a good (or even excellent and innovative) business idea that attracts customers, as it was in Kodak's, Blockbuster's, or Ask Jeeves' case. What is required, is the ability to stay attractive to existing and prospective customers, i.e., the ability to win and retain customers, and to adapt to the changing demands, trends and economic conditions. All this can be achieved thanks to a meticulously designed and regularly reviewed and updated business model. The aim of this paper is to present and analyse the learning process of acquiring and building competences in the area of business models with the use of different innovative tools. The results presented and discussed in this article come from surveys as well as face-to-face and on-line meetings conducted in the ProBM 2 ERASMUS+ project (Understanding and Developing Business Models in the Era of Globalisation), in which the total of 261 respondents from seven (7) European countries, i.e. Poland, Italy, Greece, Romania, Portugal, Malta, and Switzerland, took part between 2019 and 2022. From the meetings and surveys it follows that much more awareness of business models needs to be encouraged and developed, particularly as regards improving competences helping future business owners and their employees assess profitability and efficiency of their operations and ensure that the business will be a going concern. © 2022 Authors. All rights reserved.

15.
Frontiers in Environmental Science ; 11, 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-20244312

ABSTRACT

Competitiveness is a concept that shows up in all aspects of human life, both at the micro level, in personal, social, and professional life, and at the macro level, linked to organizational and national competitiveness with long-term effects on global competitiveness. In this paper, we aim to address competitiveness in Romania in the current context, before and after the COVID-19 pandemic, highlighting its role in reviving the economy. While until the onset of the pandemic Romania's competitiveness performance was growing, more recently, because of the global health crisis, it dropped a few places, according to the Global Competitiveness Index report. In order to have a clear picture of the degree of competitiveness in Romania, we have presented a series of statistical data for the most relevant macroeconomic indicators for our study for the 2017-2022 timeframe: the global competitiveness index, the minimum wage, labor productivity, the evolution of real labor productivity per employed person, the economic growth rate, the unemployment rate, the inflation rate, the European innovation index, gross domestic expenditure on research and development, export of goods and services as a share of GDP, etc. The methodology used involves the use of quantitative techniques, performing an econometric analysis, and correlating how the most important macroeconomic indicators can influence the degree of competitiveness at both the national and international level. For the post-pandemic timeframe, the analysis switches focus, just as the economic reality did, looking at energy costs and energy use as determinants of competitiveness. Since notions like circular economy and sustainable development correlate being energy-efficient with being competitive, however, at the same time, the high cost of investments necessary for individual businesses and countries to switch from polluting energies to clean energies impedes or at the very least heavily impacts their ability to compete with entities that don't make that same switch, it becomes apparent that the energy market impacts competitiveness metrics. Competitiveness promotes valuable contributors and underpins performance at group and company level, and the effects from the micro level will propagate, with an emission effect, to the entire national economy with obvious implications at the international level, through real growth in macroeconomic indicators, increased labor productivity, increased economic performance (market share, export share, return on capital), raising living standards and economic and social wellbeing (life expectancy index, human development index, poverty rate), education (skills, knowledge, abilities, managerial and marketing skills, corporate culture), competitive potential (innovation, R&D, promotion), and in raising the Global Competitiveness Index by focusing on factors of production, efficiency, and innovation, etc.

16.
Oxford Review of Economic Policy ; 39(2):195-209, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244304

ABSTRACT

In this paper we analyse why an understanding of the global ‘non-system', in which we now live, took so long to arrive after the Bretton Woods system collapsed in 1971. We first describe how knowledge of how an inflation-targeting regime would operate—what we call ‘Taylor-rule macroeconomics'—was only gradually created during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. We then describe how, subsequent to this, an awareness emerged, also gradually, of how the international non-system might work, depending, as it does, on Taylor-rule macroeconomics being already in place. We then discuss the Great Moderation, making clear that a well-functioning global non-system would require not just inflation targeting and floating exchange rates in each country, but also adequate fiscal discipline, and a satisfactory form of financial regulation. We describe how a well-functioning version of this global non-system would actually fit together. We then discuss how this non-system has responded to two enormous challenges of the last 15 years, namely the Global Financial Crisis and the Covid pandemic. This discussion of what has happened in the recent past provides the background to a discussion, in the companion paper by Subacchi and Vines in this issue of the Oxford Review of Economic Policy, of the challenges that the global non-system will face in the future. © The Author(s) 2023. Published by Oxford University Press.

17.
Frontiers in Political Science ; 5, 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-20243885
18.
Societamutamentopolitica-Rivista Italiana Di Sociologia ; 13(26):9-17, 2022.
Article in Italian | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-20243863

ABSTRACT

This paper is a personal attempt to rethink critically the social impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, trying to discuss about some changes, which came out in that tragic period, in the way of living time and space. There are several ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic has affected these two main structural dimensions of society and the response strategies used by people, groups, and social organizations, depending on the geographical area. There are trends that have had a highly differentiated impact, which have shown that the concept of time is not the same for everyone. Other trends have had a transversal impact, reconfiguring the ideas of present and future. Precariousness and uncertainty, that coincide with an existential specific condition of our contemporary, now take on a new meaning. Before the pandemic, the neoliberal development model seemed to have no alternative. Now, the possibility of an alternative model is imaginable, not only for the critics of it, but also for a large part of public opinion, which now even considers it necessary. The possibility of an alternative becomes concrete and achievable due to the impact that the Covid-19 pandemic has had on the structural dimensions of time and space in social life.

19.
Sport in Society ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20243792

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to examine the population's perception of corporate social responsibility of three (inter)national sport organizations during the first wave of the Covid-19 pandemic. Within an online survey in Germany, 389 open statements were gathered and analyzed using thematic analysis. Drawing on Carroll's CSR conceptualization, the identified themes were assigned to the economic, legal, ethical and discretionary responsibility of sport organizations. The analysis revealed a fifth dimension of responsibility referring to organizations' communication and transparency. Most answers were concerned with the economic and ethical theme, highlighting the importance of financial modesty and contributing to the health of others during the pandemic. This study stresses the importance for sport organizations to meet ethical and moral expectations of society during times of crisis to maintain mutually beneficial relationships with core stakeholders such as the resident population. © 2023 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

20.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 17(3):511-515, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20243786

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: The decline in GDP caused by the global economic recession of 2008 and that caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in the poor economy of countries around the globe with increased rates of unemployment and adverse job conditions. This systematic review aims to identify the impact of a Financial crisis on Psychological well-being, Life satisfaction, Health Satisfaction, and Financial Incapability. Methodology: The literature included in the review was searched from Feb 1, 2023, to March 26, 2023, by using the PUBMED database as the search engine. Studies discussing the impact of the financial or economic crisis on psychological well-being, Health, Life satisfaction, and Financial Incapabilities published in the English Language were included in this review whereas systematic reviews and metanalysis, case reports, articles published in languages other than English and articles with limited access were excluded. Result(s): Of the 26 articles found eligible for the study, there were 22 Quantitative studies, 2 qualitative studies, and 2 Mixed Method Studies. Most of the articles included in this study discussed the Global Economic crisis caused by COVID-19 and the Global Financial Crisis of 2008. Almost 80% of the studies included in this review discussed psychological well-being and the prevalence of psychological disorders including Depression, Anxiety, Stress, Fear, Loneliness, Burnout, and Suicide whereas the rest of the articles discussed mortality regarding mental disorders. Conclusion(s): Financial crisis or economic recession results in an increased prevalence of common mental disorders affecting psychological well-being by increasing rates of unemployment and adverse job conditions. Policymakers with competitive financial behavior and knowledge are essential elements for psychological well-being and life satisfaction.Copyright © 2023 Lahore Medical And Dental College. All rights reserved.

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