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2.
Health Secur ; 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2028992

ABSTRACT

From April 23 to November 2021, a wave of COVID-19 infections caused by a new Alpha variant swept across Taiwan, resulting in 14,458 positive cases and 830 deaths among over 3.8 million people tested. To cope with the sudden increase in sample volume, as of December 14, 2021, a network of 249 laboratories with a total diagnostic capacity of 158,492 real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction tests per day was established in 22 administrative regions. As of April 2022, over 9.5 million specimens were tested. Fully automated high-throughput and point-of-care nucleic acid testing, and rapid antigen testing, were simultaneously implemented to expand the country's daily diagnostic capacity. Saliva testing and sample pooling were also introduced to increase screening efficiency in certain situations. Antibody testing and genomic sequencing were also adopted for more precise epidemic investigation. Other challenges encountered and overcome include a lack of resources and interfacing of laboratory information management systems for case reporting, limited specimen allocation and delivery, and limited staff for diagnostic processing.

3.
Telehealth and Medicine Today ; 6(2), 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2026472

ABSTRACT

Objective: To provide a glimpse of various digital programs and modules that are being implemented across the country by the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bengaluru, India (an institution of national importance under the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India;one of its mandates is to develop innovative strategies to improve mental health capacity building as part of the National Mental Health Program, a publicly funded health program to cater to the public health need posed by psychiatric disorders). Design: The information is presented in a narrative fashion by organizing the activities into three categories of digital training methods: webinar mode, blended mode and hybrid mode. Results: Cadres ranging from lay-counsellors (volunteers in the community), non-specialist health workers to professionals including medical officers are covered with these initiatives. During the period from August 2016 till December 2020, more than 16 million man hours of training is delivered for more than 35,000 participants from across the country. Conclusions: These have a tremendous potential to exponentially increase skilled human resources capable of providing quality care to hitherto unserved remote areas of the rural hinterland and ultimately reduce the burgeoning treatment gap. In-depth outcome assessments are the need of the hour.

4.
ISES Solar World Congress 2021 ; : 1250-1255, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2025892

ABSTRACT

Energy systems present a complex and dynamic interrelation between energy, environment, and society. Therefore, properly educating new professionals for the renewable energy sector is a challenging endeavor by itself. The COVID-19 pandemic has imposed an additional challenge on how to engage students in energy and environment education through distance learning. In this paper, we present the methodology applied at the Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP) for students of the discipline "Energy and Environment". The graduate student interns developed an integrated methodology of disseminating knowledge about renewable energy and environment for those students and society as a whole. A positive feedback over 95% was obtained from the enrolled students in the period of 2019-2020. It was also noticed a failure rate of 24% in 2020 in contrast to zero occurrences in 2019, when face-to-face activities were in place. Finally, we present a brief discussion on the primary challenges and lessons learned during the studied period. © 2021. The Authors. Published by International Solar Energy Society Selection and/or peer review under responsibility of Scientific Committee.

5.
Journal of Public Health in Africa ; 13:70-71, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2006872

ABSTRACT

Introduction/ Background: The effect of COVID-19 on weak health systems has been devastating, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. The private sector can provide complementary support to address health crises within vulnerable public health systems. This paper provides a qualitative description on the Feasibility and Acceptability of the Public-Private Partnership Model in combating COVID-19. Methods: We carried out a feasibility and acceptability study of a unique Public-Private Partnership Model. COVID-19 samples were collected from participating sites and tested at centralized government referencing laboratory at the Kenya Medical Research Institute. We conducted a qualitative study using an explanatory research design in 5 participating health facilities in Kisumu County. We did in-depth interviews (n=49) with purposively selected key policymakers, health workers and patients. Interviews were audiorecorded. Data was transcribed in verbatim form and analyzed thematically using Nvivo 11 Results: Notable advantages of the Public-Private Partnership Model included: 1. The model helped complement tasks between Kisumu Department of Health and public and private healthcare providers, with support from an NGO (PharmAccess). 2. The model increased testing capacity at the county level by increasing the number of sample collection sites. 3. COVID-19 data digitalization, and semi-real time digital dashboards aided reporting of COVID-19 results needed for immediate contact tracing. 4. The model increased capacity building of the health workers improved adherence to MoH guidelines. Inhibitors included lack of comprehensive policies on communication channels and inadequate financial resources. Impact: The Partnership increased health workers knowledge and testing capacity enabling majority of the Kisumu population to access COVID-19 testing in addition to digitalization of COVID-19 data for real time transmission. Conclusion: A digitally supported Public-Private Partnership Model for combatting COVID-19 is feasible and acceptable by all participating stakeholders. This model is scalable and currently being deployed to 13 additional counties in Kenya.

6.
Journal of Public Health in Africa ; 13:77-78, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2006796

ABSTRACT

Introduction/ Background: The index case for SARS-CoV-2 entered in February 2020 through the international airport in Lagos, the most populous state in Nigeria. This epicenter recorded 77,676 confirmed cases as of October 15, 2021. Particularly at the onset, there was a dearth of information on preparedness of health facilities to manage COVID-19. Methods: We developed and applied SafeCare4Covid, a paper-based preparedness checklist, and organized webinars for health providers jointly with the Lagos State Health Management Agency. The tool was digitized, and evolved into a free, globally available self-assessment application, following World Health Organization guidelines. It quantifies COVID-19-related capabilities with 31 questions (score range, 0-100) and availability of COVID-19- related essential medical supplies with a 23- supplies checklist (0-100). Preparedness is assessed r.e. infrastructure, infection prevention, triaging, COVID-19 trainings, staffing, emergency response team, referral, and supplies (PPEs and oxygen). Each facility received an automated quality improvement plan. Data was shared through dashboards with stakeholders for decisionmaking. Results: Between July 2020-March 2021, 66 health facilities in Nigeria completed the SafeCare4Covid selfassessment (56 in Lagos, 44 of those private and 12 public). The average capability score (n=66) was 71 (interquartile range, 61-86), and the average supply score (n=51) was 80 (74-91). Majority of facilities did not offer COVID-19 tests/did not report test-access status (95.5%, 63/66), nor had guidelines for the management of confirmed cases, COVID-19 sample processing/referral, staff mental support and contact tracing. Many centers did not have infection prevention policies (44%, 29/66). Supply of N95/FFP2 respirators was limited. Impact: The SafeCare4Covid tool generated an automated customized quality improvement plan outlining corrective actions to improve the facility's preparedness (processes, infrastructure and supplies) to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and other infections within and to the community. Conclusion: Digitizing the SafeCare4Covid tool improved the efficiency and timeliness of assessing health facility epidemic readiness. The tool facilitated corrective actions focusing on capacity building of case management, infection prevention protocols, and procurement of PPEs to prevent facility-acquired COVID-19 infections.

7.
East Mediterr Health J ; 28(2): 163-168, 2022 Feb 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2002919

ABSTRACT

Background: Pakistan's Ministry of National Health Services, Regulations and Coordination, with support from the World Health Organization, developed and implemented the "We Care" programme to protect frontline health care workers engaged in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) response. Aims: This paper reports on the training part of the programme, which aimed to train 100 000 frontline health care workers on the proper use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and on the lessons learnt from implementation of the training. Methods: A team of experts developed the curriculum and its accompanying material. Initial training was given to deans of all participating institutions and to master trainers from each university. Staff of all public and private hospitals enrolled in the training and other frontline health care workers were invited to register individually. Four types of educational material were produced and used a guidance booklet, a training video, a set of PowerPoint presentations to explain the PPE and their use, and a poster. Results: A total of 2000 training sessions were conducted across the country from May to December 2020 and 100 000 frontline health care workers were trained on the use of PPE. Of those trained, 25% were doctors, 35% were nurses and paramedics, and 40% were allied health staff, with an almost equal gender distribution. Conclusions: With limited resources and over a short period, the We Care programme trained a large number of frontline health care workers, which enhanced their safety and reduced the irrational use of PPE.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Personal Protective Equipment , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Humans , Pakistan
8.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 63: 103355, 2022 Apr 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2000637

ABSTRACT

AIMS: 1. To identify approaches and strategies that can build research capacity among academics from the disciplines of nursing and midwifery working in tertiary education institutions. 2. To identify evidence-informed strategies that enable academic transformation of professional identity from clinician to researcher. BACKGROUND: Nurses and midwives are core to leading health practice and system change through research. Despite manifold efforts to build research capacity among nurse academics over the past two decades, there is scant evidence about what specific strategies are effective and few robust evaluations of any capacity building strategies. DESIGN: This scoping review was guided by Arksey and O'Malley's framework to identify key concepts and map the available evidence specifically related to volume, nature and characteristics. METHODS: The authors followed a scoping review framework and used a PRISMA flowchart to report findings. Electronic data bases (CINAHL, ERIC, Medline and Scopus) were searched between April and June 2020. Literature published between 2000 and 2020 was searched. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT) was used for data coding and extraction and all included papers were subsequently thematically analysed. RESULTS: Fourteen studies from seven countries met the inclusion criteria and were comprised of literature reviews (n = 4) case studies (n = 3) qualitative survey (n = 1) and intervention studies (n = 6). Four themes were identified as follows: academic identity, organisational changes, leadership and research skills development. CONCLUSIONS: Rigorous evaluation of research capacity building strategies for academics from the disciplines of nursing and midwifery is a significant gap in the literature. To promulgate research among nurse and midwife academics, strong, supportive leadership and a range of inclusive and targeted approaches are needed. Significant work remains in terms of negotiating with the broader university to operationalise supportive systems and structures. Clarifying how self-concept has an impact on building and maintaining a research identity for nurse and midwife academics is an area worthy of further study. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: Strong, supportive leadership with inclusive and targeted research skills development is key to reorienting academic nursing and midwifery research culture.

9.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 16(1): 1-2, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1991388
10.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-342013

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the importance of global genomic surveillance to monitor the emergence and spread of SARS-CoV-2 variants and inform public health decision-making. Until December 2020 there was minimal capacity for viral genomic surveillance in most Caribbean countries. To overcome this constraint, the COVID-19: Infectious disease Molecular epidemiology for PAthogen Control & Tracking (COVID-19 IMPACT) project was implemented to establish rapid SARS-CoV-2 whole genome nanopore sequencing at The University of the West Indies (UWI) in Trinidad and Tobago (T&T) and provide greatly needed SARS-CoV-2 sequencing services for T&T and 16 other Caribbean Public Health Agency Member States (CMS). Methods: Using the Oxford Nanopore Technologies MinION sequencing platform and ARTIC network sequencing protocols and bioinformatics pipeline, a total of 3610 SARS-CoV-2 positive RNA samples, received from 17 CMS, were sequenced in-situ during the period December 5 th 2020 to December 31st 2021. Findings: Ninety-one (91) Pango lineages, including those of five variants of concern (VOC) and four variants of interest (VOI), were identified in the CMS. Genetic analysis revealed at least 260 introductions to the CMS from other global regions. For each of the 17 CMS, the percentage of reported COVID-19 cases sequenced by the COVID-19 IMPACT laboratory ranged from 0·02% to 3·80% (median = 1·12%). Sequences submitted to GISAID by our study represented 73·3% of all SARS-CoV-2 sequences from the 17 CMS available on the database up to December 31 st 2021. Increased staffing, process and infrastructural improvement over the course of the project helped reduce turnaround times for reporting to originating institutions and sequence uploads to GISAID. However, insufficient access to sample metadata, including clinical data and travel history, was a major limitation and restricted further in-depth analyses. Interpretation: Insights from our genomic surveillance network in the Caribbean region directly influenced non-pharmaceutical countermeasures in the CMS countries. However, limited availability of associated surveillance and clinical data made it challenging to contextualise the observed SARS-CoV-2 diversity and evolution, highlighting the need for development of infrastructure for collecting and integrating genomic sequencing data and sample-associated metadata. Funding: This work was supported by grants to CVFC from the T&T-UWI RDI Fund (No. 26607-447524), Pan American Health Organization / World Health Organisation (PAHO/WHO;SCON2021-00379), Ministry of Health Trinidad and Tobago (He: 10/45/35 Vol 1) and the AHF Global Public Health Institute, and in-kind support from PAHO/WHO and the Caribbean Public Health Agency. SCH acknowledges support of a Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellowship (Wellcome Trust grant number 220414/Z/20/Z).

11.
Heart Lung and Circulation ; 31:S307-S308, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1977308

ABSTRACT

Background: The East Timor Hearts Fund (ETHF) has provided cardiac services in Timor-Leste since 2010, conducting three clinics yearly. With international border closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic, development of collaborative telehealth services was required. Methods: Scoping discussions identified major challenges (structural, patient-related and medical system-related). At two pilot clinics, patient history, investigation and management were collated. Clinic metrics were compared to an index face-to-face clinic in February 2019. Post-clinic discussions identified areas of success and shortfall in the conduct of the telehealth clinics. Results: 23 patients were reviewed at the online telehealth clinics held onsite at Timorese medical facilities. Compared to an index 2019 clinic, there were markedly lower numbers of new referrals (2 vs 190 patients, 8.7% vs 59.4%). Patients seen at the online clinic were predominantly female (17/23, 73.9%) and Dili-based (18/23, 78.3%) with a mean age of 25.9 ± 7.2 years old. The majority (12/23, 52.2%) had isolated rheumatic mitral valve disease. Investigations including electrocardiography, pathology, echocardiography and 6-minute walk tests were conducted in select patients. Medication advice was provided for 10 (43.5%) patients. 11 patients (47.8%) were deemed to require urgent intervention. Post-clinic discussions indicated general satisfaction with telehealth clinics, although frustration at current inability to provide interventional services was highlighted. Conclusion: Our pilot telehealth clinics indicate that capacity-building telemedicine can be rapidly implemented in an emergency setting internationally. Clinic design benefits from careful identification and resolution of challenges to optimise flow. Cardiac patients in Timor-Leste have a significant burden of disease amenable to intervention.

12.
JMIR Form Res ; 6(7): e37243, 2022 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1974520

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Stroke Recovery in Motion Implementation Planner guides teams through the process of planning for the implementation of community-based exercise programs for people with stroke, in alignment with implementation science frameworks. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to conduct a field test with end users to describe how teams used the Planner in real-world conditions; describe the effects of Planner use on participants' implementation-planning knowledge, attitudes, and activities; and identify factors influencing the use of the Planner. METHODS: This field test study used a longitudinal qualitative design. We recruited teams across Canada who intended to implement a community-based exercise program for people with stroke in the next 6 to 12 months and were willing to use the Planner to guide their work. We completed semistructured interviews at the time of enrollment, monitoring calls every 1 to 2 months, and at the end of the study to learn about implementation-planning work completed and Planner use. The interviews were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Completed Planner steps were plotted onto a timeline for comparison across teams. RESULTS: We enrolled 12 participants (program managers and coordinators, rehabilitation professionals, and fitness professionals) from 5 planning teams. The teams were enrolled in the study between 4 and 14 months, and we conducted 25 interviews. We observed that the teams worked through the planning process in diverse and nonlinear ways, adapted to their context. All teams provided examples of how using the Planner changed their implementation-planning knowledge (eg, knowing the steps), attitudes (eg, valuing community engagement), and activities (eg, hosting stakeholder meetings). We identified team, organizational, and broader contextual factors that hindered and facilitated uptake of the Planner. Participants shared valuable tips from the field to help future teams optimize use of the Planner. CONCLUSIONS: The Stroke Recovery in Motion Implementation Planner is an adaptable resource that may be used in diverse settings to plan community-based exercise programs for people with stroke. These findings may be informative to others who are developing resources to build the capacity of those working in community-based settings to implement new programs and practices. Future work is needed to monitor the use and understand the effect of using the Planner on exercise program implementation and sustainability.

13.
Malawi Medical Journal ; 34:60-67, 2022.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1970280

ABSTRACT

AJOL : The COVID-19 pandemic has elicited swift and innovative responses due to the severity of the outbreak. Higher education institutions worldwide with pharmacy programs have identified vital gaps in COVID-19 care and has undertaken proactive steps to aid in the fight against the coronavirus. In Malawi, the Kamuzu University of Health Science's Department of Pharmacy initiated the production of a modified formulation of the World Health Organization's (WHO) recommended hand sanitizer. This manufacturing venture involved mobilizing the pharmacy faculty, identifying gaps in supplies and equipment, and utilizing evidenced-based information to create a high-quality sanitation product, which passed the requirements as tested by the Malawi Bureau of Standards. The department of pharmacy is expanding their distribution of the product to meet the needs of frontline healthcare workers and vulnerable populations. With historical issues of accessing care in Malawi and with COVID-19's spread among healthcare workers, this hand sanitizer venture is vital in the public healthcare's system response. The department of pharmacy will continue to lead the pharmacy profession in Malawi to provide targeted interventions in this unprecedented time

14.
BMJ Global Health ; 7:A33-A34, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1968279

ABSTRACT

Introduction Rwanda, an East African country with a 12.9 million population, is committed to sustaining significant health gains of the MDG era while tackling the emerging challenges including the COVID-19 pandemic. The past achievements were thanks to Rwanda's universal health coverage (UHC) model, characterized by expansion of health service delivery at all levels, with emphasis on primary health care, f;and more than 85% health insurance coverage through the Community Based Health Insurance (CBHI). The challenge now for Rwanda is to ensure CBHI sustainability and coverage of more services, which requires both more resources mobilization and priority setting systems that maximize health outcomes within available resources. This paper was prepared to document and share the Rwandan experience of priority setting reforms for UHC. Methods This is a policy analysis case study, describing the context, process, and key actors in the priority setting reforms for CBHI in Rwanda, using a policy analysis triangle by Walt and Gilson. Information was collected through observation and desk review. Results The priority-setting reforms for UHC were dictated by the increasing pressure on the resource-constrained CBHI to cover more tertiary-level services. In 2019 stakeholders led by the Rwanda's Ministry of Health and Rwanda Social Security Board (managing the CBHI scheme) started discussing how health-economic evidence can contribute to priority setting decisions for CBHI. After several meetings and workshops, the Government decided, through a ministerial instruction published in August 2021, to change the process of defining CBHI benefits packages, and established new criteria and an appraisal committee. In November 2021 a 3- days workshop was organized to develop 1-year implementation roadmap, after learning from other country's experiences. Discussion The initiation of Rwanda's priority-setting reforms was characterized by Government ownership and stakeholder engagement. The next steps will require strong coordination, and long-term capacity building through learning by doing.

15.
Front Public Health ; 10: 907012, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963637

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Quantifying the combined impact of morbidity and mortality is a key enabler to assessing the impact of COVID-19 across countries and within countries relative to other diseases, regions, or demographics. Differences in methods, data sources, and definitions of mortality due to COVID-19 may hamper comparisons. We describe efforts to support countries in estimating the national-level burden of COVID-19 using disability-adjusted life years. Methods: The European Burden of Disease Network developed a consensus methodology, as well as a range of capacity-building activities to support burden of COVID-19 studies. These activities have supported 11 national studies so far, with study periods between January 2020 and December 2021. Results: National studies dealt with various data gaps and different assumptions were made to face knowledge gaps. Still, they delivered broadly comparable results that allow for interpretation of consistencies, as well as differences in the quantified direct health impact of the pandemic. Discussion: Harmonized efforts and methodologies have allowed for comparable estimates and communication of results. Future studies should evaluate the impact of interventions, and unravel the indirect health impact of the COVID-19 crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cost of Illness , Humans , Morbidity , Pandemics , Quality-Adjusted Life Years
16.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet ; 2022 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1958757

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To implement a Flexible Operational Research Training (FORT) course within the Fistula Care Plus Project, Democratic Republic of Congo, from 2017 to 2021. METHODS: A descriptive study using design and implementation (process and outcome) data. Two to four members of medical teams from three supported sites were selected for the training based on their research interests and level of involvement in the program. RESULTS: Two courses (13-14 months each) involving nine facilitators and 17 participants overall were conducted between 2017 and 2021. Most participants in both courses were medical doctors (67% and 71%, respectively) from the supported hospitals (83% and 77%, respectively). About half were women. In addition to classic face-to-face didactic modules, the courses integrated online platforms to cope with the changing contexts (Ebola virus and COVID-19). Most participants reported having gained new skills in developing research protocols, collecting, managing, and analyzing data, and developing research manuscripts. The two courses resulted in six scientific manuscripts and three presentations at international conferences. Participants subsequently published five papers from their research after the first course. The total direct costs for both courses were representing a cost of $3669 per participant trained. CONCLUSION: The FORT model proved feasible, efficient, and successful. However, scaling up will require more adaptation efforts from programs and participating sites.

17.
44th AMOP Technical Seminar on Environmental Contamination and Response 2022 ; : 361-373, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1958255

ABSTRACT

A group of British Columbia North Pacific Coast First Nations (NPC Nations) have been actively developing Geographic Response Strategies (GRS) within their territories since 2018. A multi-year project plan included three years of field work (2019-2021), during which technical experts would support First Nations communities in transferring knowledge and practice. The implementation of lockdowns, travel restrictions, and public health advisories beginning in March 2020 substantially changed the planned approach and ultimately spurred novel approaches to remotely supporting field surveys and mentoring First Nations community members to lead oil spill response surveys. To enable the continuation of field work, a contracting team worked closely with the NPC Nations to create a strategic approach to collaborate through web-based conference platforms and cloud-based GIS. There were several imperatives to continue this work – First Nations communities view marine oil spill planning as a top priority based on past spills in their territories and risks from coastal shipping. The project funding was grant-based and time-bound, expiring at the end of FY2021-22. Despite the pandemic, the participating First Nations still had a successful field season with roughly 40 combined days in the field from April 2020 to November 2021, with approximately 221 sites surveys and close to 500 tactics developed. Through innovation, collaboration, and trial and error, 12 BC First Nations continued to develop GRS to help strengthen their marine response capacity while adhering to the strict COVID-19 guidelines set in place by their local communities, which were often more stringent than provincial and national policies to protect their elders and other vulnerable community members in remote areas with limited medical facilities. This paper discusses the specific modifications to the field surveying process driven by the pandemic and the technology tools used to communicate and capture data accurately. In addition, this paper examines how Geographic Information System (GIS) was incorporated into the GRS development, including GIS training for community members and the use of tablet-based applications to gather field data. It describes a successful approach to peer-to-peer knowledge transfer across First Nations communities, building a community of practice and mutual support. Finally, this paper reports lessons learned and suggests best practices to continue broadening the marine response and preparedness capacity within the BC First Nations. © 2022 44th AMOP Technical Seminar on Environmental Contamination and Response. All rights reserved.

18.
DISASTER PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT ; 31(6):30-44, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1937788

ABSTRACT

Purpose The study aims to identify the gaps and the potentialities of citizen-generated data in four axes of warning system: (1) risk knowledge, (2) flood forecasting and monitoring, (3) risk communication and (4) flood risk governance. Design/methodology/approach Research inputs for this work were gathered during an international virtual dialogue that engaged 40 public servants, practitioners, academics and policymakers from Brazilian and British hazard and risk monitoring agencies during the Covid-19 pandemic. Findings The common challenges identified were lack of local data, data integration systems, data visualisation tools and lack of communication between flood agencies. Originality/value This work instigates an interdisciplinary cross-country collaboration and knowledge exchange, focused on tools, methods and policies used in the Brazil and the UK in an attempt to develop trans-disciplinary innovative ideas and initiatives for informing and enhancing flood risk governance.

19.
Non-conventional in English | WHOIRIS, Grey literature | ID: grc-754466

ABSTRACT

WHO Regional Office for Europe held an online training session “Capacity-building for consultants on the new WHO recommendation for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis” on 15–18 June 2020. The objectives of the training session included capacity-building of the new and existing regional Green Light Committee for the WHO European Region (rGLC/Europe) consultants on the new WHO guidelines;increasing the pool of consultants to enable the smooth continuation of support to countries with regard to the introduction of the latest treatment policies based on the latest WHO recommendations;and assisting countries in the operationalization of the new guidelines. Members of the rGLC/Europe, representatives from the Stop TB Partnership, the Global Drug Facility (GDF), staff from WHO Headquarters Global TB Programme and from the Joint Tuberculosis, HIV and Viral Hepatitis Programme of the WHO Regional Office for Europe took part in the training session. During the meeting, staff and core experts from the WHO Regional Office for Europe and rGLC experts shared updates on DR-TB treatment and related topics, in particular TB/HIV and paediatric TB and latent TB infection (LTBI) management and their implications for laboratory diagnosis, drug supply, infection control and clinical follow-up. The WHO Regional Office and Global TB Programme also addressed the challenge of COVID-19 pandemic, which is an overlapping threat hampering TB-related activities. Experienced and new rGLC members discussed the in-country mission Terms of Reference, expected results and possible complications.

20.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 883, 2022 Jul 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1928186

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has severely challenged healthcare delivery systems worldwide. Healthcare Workers were unable to assess and manage the cases due to limited knowledge of treating the virus and inadequate infrastructure. Digital interventions played a crucial role in the training of healthcare workers to get through the pandemic. Project Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) initiated the COVID-ECHO telementoring program for strengthening the knowledge and skills of healthcare workers. The study aimed at assessing the effects of the ECHO telementoring model in the capacity building of healthcare workers in the context of COVID-19 in India. METHOD: We adopted a mixed-method approach with a parallel combination design. A quantitative survey was used to measure changes in the knowledge and self-efficacy among doctors and nurses. In-depth Interviews were used for qualitative exploration of perceptions and experiences of all the study participants. Student t-test and ANOVA were used to assess significant differences between mean scores across participant characteristics for different themes. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. In-depth Interviews were analyzed using Framework Analysis. The evaluation followed the first five levels of Moore's model. RESULTS: The results highlighted the strengthening of knowledge and skills of healthcare workers in the assessment and management of COVID-19 after the ECHO training. Learning and performance ratings were high as 96% reported an increase in knowledge and 98% were able to apply it in their clinical practices. The key challenges identified were technical issues like internet connectivity and lack of interaction due to limited visual connection. The hybrid sessions, use of video camera, feedback mechanism, and inclusion of Continuing Medical Education were recommended by participants to improve the model. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study are an important addition to the pre-existing literature supporting the replicability of the ECHO model in the upskilling of healthcare professionals working in underserved and remote areas, not only in the context of COVID-19 but also in other public health domains. To enhance the effectiveness of this ECHO model, the study findings may be used to refine the model and improve the areas of concern.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Health Personnel/education , Humans , Pandemics
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