Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 14(6): 2462-2474, 2022 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1744505

ABSTRACT

Social isolation has been recommended as a strategy for reducing COVID-19 risk, but it may have unintended consequences for mental well-being. We explored the relationship between social isolation and symptoms of depression and anxiety in older adults during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and assessed the role of cardiometabolic diseases (CMDs) in this association. Between May and September 2020, 1,190 older adults from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen were surveyed about their behaviors and health consequences during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. In total, 913 (76.7%) participants reported socially isolating at home to avoid infection during this period. Social isolation was associated with a greater likelihood of reduced mental well-being (i.e., feelings of depression or anxiety) (OR: 1.74, 95% CI: 1.15-2.65). In joint exposure analysis, there was a significant likelihood of reduced mental well-being only among people who were socially isolating and had CMDs (OR: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.22-3.71) (reference: not isolating, CMD-free). In conclusion, social isolation as a COVID-19 prevention strategy was related to reduced mental well-being in an urban sample of Swedish older adults, especially among individuals with CMDs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation , Sweden/epidemiology
2.
J Clin Med ; 10(21)2021 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488627

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, psychological disorders have been documented in the population, and their exacerbation in vulnerable populations such as those with Cardiometabolic Diseases (CD) might challenge health systems. This study determined psychological factors associated with CD in Colombian adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. For this purpose, 284 persons were evaluated, 142 without CD and 142 with CD. Sociodemographic data were collected, and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), the SF-12v2, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (ZSDS), which were integrated into an online form, were used. Through a simple and multiple logistic regression model, it was shown that CD was associated with low sleeping quality (LSQ) (OR = 3.51) and with depressive symptoms (DS) (OR = 1.98). In addition, in the group with CD, the presence of DS was related to BMI (OR = 2.45), and LSQ was related to living with persons at risk for COVID-19 (OR = 3.64) and BMI (OR = 5.88). In conclusion, this study showed that people with CD have a higher chance of presenting DS and LSQ. Furthermore, living with people at risk for COVID-19 was related to the presence of LSQ.

3.
Front Cell Dev Biol ; 9: 659032, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201299

ABSTRACT

A new infectious disease, COVID-19, has spread around the world. The most common symptoms of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection are cough and fever, but severe cases can develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. The main receptor for SARS-CoV-2 in human tissue is angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, and the lungs, heart, and kidneys are the most affected organs. Besides the inflammatory process and tissue damage, the presence of a cytokine "storm" has been related to a higher mortality rate. Other infectious viral diseases, such as Zika, chikungunya, and influenza, were associated with complications in pregnant women, such as growth restriction, malformation, preterm birth, low birth weight, miscarriage, and death, although they can also cause developmental disorders in infants and adolescents. Evidence points out that stressors during pregnancy and infancy may lead to the development of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, we hypothesize that COVID-19 infection during the critical phases of development can program the individual to chronic diseases in adulthood. It is important that COVID-19 patients receive proper monitoring as a way to avoid expensive costs to public health in the future.

4.
Glob Heart ; 16(1): 15, 2021 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145668

ABSTRACT

Background: SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has modified the cardiovascular care of ambulatory patients. The aim of this survey was to study changes in lifestyle habits, treatment adherence, and mental health status in patients with cardiometabolic disease, but no clinical evidence of COVID-19. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in ambulatory patients with cardiometabolic disease using paper/digital surveys. Variables investigated included socioeconomic status, physical activity, diet, tobacco use, alcohol intake, treatment discontinuation, and psychological symptoms. Results: A total of 4,216 patients (50.9% males, mean age 60.3 ± 15.3 years old) from 13 Spanish-speaking Latin American countries were enrolled. Among the study population, 46.4% of patients did not have contact with a healthcare provider, 31.5% reported access barriers to treatments and 17% discontinued some medication. Multivariate analysis showed that non-adherence to treatment was more prevalent in the secondary prevention group: peripheral vascular disease (OR 1.55, CI 1.08-2.24; p = 0.018), heart failure (OR 1.36, CI 1.05-1.75; p = 0.017), and coronary artery disease (OR 1.29 CI 1.04-1.60; p = 0.018). No physical activity was reported by 38% of patients. Only 15% of patients met minimum recommendations of physical activity (more than 150 minutes/week) and vegetable and fruit intake. Low/very low income (45.5%) was associated with a lower level of physical activity (p < 0.0001), less fruit and vegetables intake (p < 0.0001), more tobacco use (p < 0.001) and perception of depression (p < 0.001). Low educational level was also associated with the perception of depression (OR 1.46, CI 1.26-1.70; p < 0.01). Conclusions: Patients with cardiometabolic disease but without clinical evidence of COVID-19 showed significant medication non-adherence, especially in secondary prevention patients. Deterioration in lifestyle habits and appearance of depressive symptoms during the pandemic were frequent and related to socioeconomic status.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Depression/psychology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Diet , Dyslipidemias/therapy , Exercise , Treatment Adherence and Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/therapy , Cardiometabolic Risk Factors , Cigarette Smoking/epidemiology , Coronary Artery Disease/therapy , Educational Status , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Hypertension/therapy , Latin America/epidemiology , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Outpatients , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Secondary Prevention , Social Class , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Front Cardiovasc Med ; 7: 138, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696527

ABSTRACT

Background: Cardiometabolic morbidity and medications, specifically Angiotensin Converting Enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARBs), have been linked with adverse outcomes from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This study aims to investigate, factors associated with COVID-19 positivity in hospital for 1,436 UK Biobank participants; compared with individuals who tested negative, and with the untested, presumed negative, rest of the cohort. Methods: We studied 7,099 participants from the UK Biobank who had been tested for COVID-19 in hospital. We considered the following exposures: age, sex, ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, ACEi/ARB use, prior myocardial infarction (MI), and smoking. We undertook comparisons between (1) COVID-19 positive and COVID-19 negative tested participants; and (2) COVID-19 tested positive and the remaining participants (tested negative plus untested, n = 494,838). Logistic regression models were used to investigate univariate and mutually adjusted associations. Results: Among participants tested for COVID-19, Black, Asian, and Minority ethnic (BAME) ethnicity, male sex, and higher BMI were independently associated with a positive result. BAME ethnicity, male sex, greater BMI, diabetes, hypertension, and smoking were independently associated with COVID-19 positivity compared to the remaining cohort (test negatives plus untested). However, similar associations were observed when comparing those who tested negative for COVID-19 with the untested cohort; suggesting that these factors associate with general hospitalization rather than specifically with COVID-19. Conclusions: Among participants tested for COVID-19 with presumed moderate to severe symptoms in a hospital setting, BAME ethnicity, male sex, and higher BMI are associated with a positive result. Other cardiometabolic morbidities confer increased risk of hospitalization, without specificity for COVID-19. ACE/ARB use did not associate with COVID-19 status.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL