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1.
Br J Hosp Med (Lond) ; 83(10): 1-6, 2022 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100430

ABSTRACT

Clinical teaching fellowships are becoming increasingly popular, with the numbers of posts ever-expanding. This increase has accelerated as education and training start to recover from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the nature of these roles, the entry requirements and the potential benefits are often poorly defined. This article outlines the author's experience of working as a clinical teaching fellow for a year and provides tips on what to look out for when considering these roles, as well as how to get the most out of them.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate , Humans , Pandemics , Fellowships and Scholarships , Teaching
2.
Sustainability ; 14(19):12889, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066477

ABSTRACT

Reaching full employment and reducing the unemployment rate is one of the 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs) issued by the United Nations to face COVID-19 and the complex global economic situation. Although governments, society, and organizations have made efforts towards SDGs, how employees exert their subjective initiative and enhance their career adaptability is fundamental to solve the employment issue. How to enhance employees’ career adaptability to strengthen their psychological ability to face career changes is the guarantee of sustainable employment. In the light of the main force role and the unique characteristics of the new generation of employees in the workplace, this study aims to explore the relation between a proactive personality and career adaptability. According to the career construction theory, this study constructed a moderated mediation model to test the effect of a proactive personality on career adaptability through career identity and thriving at work, and the moderating role of task interdependence. Surveying 285 new-generation employees in China, this research found that a proactive personality had a significant positive impact on career adaptability, and that career identity and thriving at work mediate the relation. Task interdependence moderated this relation. Our findings extend the research of career construction theory on individual factors and contextual factors, and offer insights into enhancing the sustainability of human resource management and supporting sustainable economic development.

4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065978

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to explore workforce experiences of the rapid implementation of a SARS-CoV-2 asymptomatic testing service (ATS) in a higher education setting during the COVID-19 pandemic. The setting was a multi-campus university in the UK, which hosted a testing service for employees and students over two years. Qualitative semi-structured videoconference interviews were conducted. We contacted 58 participants and 25 were interviewed (43% response rate). Data were analysed thematically. The analysis produced four overarching themes: (1) feelings relating to their involvement in the service, (2) perceptions of teamwork, (3) perceptions of ATS leadership, (4) valuing the opportunity for career development. Agile and inclusive leadership style created psychological safety and team cohesion, which facilitated participants in the implementation of a rapid mitigation service, at pace and scale. Specific features of the ATS (shared vision, collaboration, networking, skills acquisition) instilled self-confidence, value and belonging, meaningfully impacting on professional development and career opportunities. This is the first qualitative study to explore the experiences of university employees engaged in the rapid deployment of a service as part of a pandemic outbreak and mitigation strategy within a higher education setting. Despite pressures and challenges of the task, professional growth and advancement were universal. This has implications for workforce engagement and creating workplaces across the sector that are well-prepared to respond to future pandemics and other disruptive events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , Workforce
5.
Med Sci Educ ; : 1-6, 2022 Oct 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2060130

ABSTRACT

A survey was administered to describe research perceptions among college-level students in combined baccalaureate-MD (BA/MD) programs in the United States. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze participant research perceptions. The estimated response rate was 26% (430/1653). Most respondents conducted scientific research in high school and college and reported barriers to research participation. Key barriers to research participation included lack of time, research knowledge or experience, and sufficient research guidance as well as the disruptions of COVID-19. Most respondents reported that research-supporting programs were available at their institution and perceived faculty mentorship programs as the most helpful for broadening their research experience. Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s40670-022-01619-5.

6.
International Journal of Care and Caring ; 6(3):355-355–377, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2054223

ABSTRACT

Globally, life expectancy is increasing, as is the need for effective care responses to chronic health conditions, global emergencies and health disparities. Alongside this is a shortage of skilled caregivers. This four-country qualitative study investigates the views of ‘care’ and ‘care careers’ of Generation Z (the next generation to join the workforce). Four cross-cultural themes emerged: conceptualising care;objects and subjects of care;recognising the challenges of care;and appreciating care work. Discussed in relation to Tronto’s analysis of care, these themes illuminate Generation Z’s commitment to care and highlight the need for organisational and political action to attract young people to care careers.

7.
JOM ; 74(10):3666-3670, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2048538

ABSTRACT

The first word that comes to mind is POWERFUL. The messages from the speakers and the discussions were moving, powerful, and motivating." Shared as a written comment in the follow up survey to the Fourth Summit on Diversity in the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Professions (DMMM4), this perspective reflected a common theme expressed throughout the two-day summit, co-located with the TMS 2022 Annual Meeting & Exhibition (TMS2022). Building on the work accomplished in the previous three DMMM Summits, the 2022 iteration gave attendees the opportunity to engage in important discussions with speakers, panelists, and each other on achieving true inclusion in the workplace. Holding a DMMM Summit concurrent with a TMS annual meeting was a new twist on this signature TMS program, which had been previously organized as a standalone specialty conference. Originally slated to take place in conjunction with TMS2021, DMMM4 was included as part of annual meeting registration to provide access to members who would not typically be funded to travel to a non-technical meeting. As with everything in life, these plans changed in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

8.
Nature ; 2022 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2050302
10.
J Vocat Behav ; 139: 103789, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2049593

ABSTRACT

This paper draws on event system theory and the literatures on career orientations and career shocks to examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on employees' career orientations. Factor analyses in three samples allow us to group seven career orientations into two dimensions: needs-based career orientations (those related to security, lifestyle, and health) and talent- and value-based career orientations (related to job content). We use a three-wave survey of Chinese employees to examine how these two broad orientations evolved in two time windows-one representing high, the other low event strength. We find that the two types of career orientations evolved in different ways during the pandemic: employees' needs-based career orientations were more salient during the COVID crisis than their talent- and value-based career orientations, and the salience of needs-based career orientations did not decrease as event strength abated. Employees' personal exposure to the crisis was positively related to the salience of their needs-based career orientations, but not to the salience of talent- and value-based career orientations. We also show that the salience of needs-based career orientations differed across employee groups: it was weaker among more experienced and successful employees (those higher in the managerial hierarchy and with steeper past pay increases).

11.
JOM ; 74(10):3682-3683, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2047007

ABSTRACT

In the last two years, the TMS Foundation has weathered an unimaginable storm along with the rest of the world. The uncertainty that came with the COVID-19 pandemic left many feeling vulnerable, yet the TMS Foundation has endured these global economic challenges and come out stronger. This perseverance is best demonstrated by the generosity of their donors. In 2021, a total of 348 individuals raised $168,048 to increase awards for early career professionals, expand the TMS Family Care Grants program, and reinstate the Presidential Scholarship. Sixty of those donors joined the TMS Foundation family with their first gift. During the 2021 year-end appeal campaign alone, which ran from October through the end of December, a total of $79,924 was raised for a stronger future. Overall, support for the TMS technical division scholarships as well as the Young Leaders Professional Development Awards grew, along with unrestricted donations to the Foundation. And 2021 saw an increase of 56 donors from 2020.

12.
Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences ; 83(11-A):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2046865

ABSTRACT

The work-family interface continues to change as modern family dynamics shift and diversity in the workforce increases. Dual-earner couples with children are just one example of the complexities affecting families that are increasingly present in the workplace. This qualitative study examined several factors that are under addressed in the current work-family literature, focusing on dual-earner couples with children, same-sex dual-earner couples, and families where at least one partner has a doctoral level occupation. The current study included both heterosexual and sexual minority (i.e., same-sex) couples to reflect families in current American society, and to contribute to the limited body of research on same-sex couples in the work-family interface. The objectives of this study were to understand more about the work-family interface among dual-earner couples in doctoral level occupations, to understand how couple relationships and parenting are influenced by navigating both work and home domains, and to understand the role of occupational and organizational factors such as family-friendly policies in supporting one's home and family life. A semi-structured qualitative interview with couples was used to gather data, which was analyzed using generic qualitative inquiry and thematic analysis. The overall findings of this study were that participants experience a variety of negative and positive impacts due to the factors of spillover, being a working parent, being in a doctoral level occupation, the family-friendly policies at their workplaces, COVID-19, being a dual-earner couple, the influence of gender roles, and sexual orientation. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

13.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2046761

ABSTRACT

Science kits have been a staple of learning for some time, but in the era of COVID-19 at-home science kits took specific prominence in educational initiatives. In this paper, we delineate how kit-based education can be paired with virtual connection technology to enhance postsecondary and career exploration. The “Content, Connection and Careers” kit-based program has been developed to enable youth to explore electrical engineering principles while connecting virtually with university students to discuss engineering courses and careers. When assembled and wired up, the kit components become linear motors that use a magnetic force to pull a bolt into a pipe when youth press a button. This follows the same working principles as a doorbell or solenoid. These kits are supported by virtual learning sessions where youth connect with university students and faculty to fully understand the educational content, connect to peers and caring adults to share their learning, and explore careers that use electrical engineering skills. To investigate the effectiveness of the program, surveys were distributed to participants to understand whether the kits were simple enough for independent learning but robust enough to encourage additional self-exploration of more difficult topics with the aid of expert scientists and other adult role models. Additionally, youth were asked if the connections made with university faculty and students was beneficial in their thinking of postsecondary options and college engagement. Over 60 elementary and middle-school aged youth participated in the project. Over 80 percent of survey respondents self-reported improved knowledge of how an electromagnetic field works and how to build a simple electromagnet. Other results showed an increased understanding of engineering careers and courses required to study electric engineering in college. Before their experience in the project, very few of the young people had ever talked to university faculty or university students about their areas of research or their journey into the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). This connection was described in the surveys as what the youth liked best about the project. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2022.

14.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2046556

ABSTRACT

Promotion of STEM careers in K-12 schools is essential for the sustainable progress of the world. College students from engineering careers can provide a unique contribution to this effort. Their experience is like the K-12 school environment. However, they have advanced knowledge and skills of their critical role in society. They can offer a realistic model for K-12 students to guide their career choice and to become motivated for STEM college education. In addition, college students benefit from these experiences by reinforcing their commitment to a successful career, and to service the communities that have supported their education. Moreover, the teamwork required for an efficient and engaging set of activities provides possibilities for the inclusion and diversity of different perspectives based on their personal experiences at school. In addition, this team effort provides for the development of multiple skills for their professional job. However, though the benefit of this strategy is well known, most colleges promote outreach as extracurricular activities. This paper discusses a three-year experience in the Chemical Engineering Department, with the participation of 360 college students, in 70 projects, reaching over 2,000 school students, as a curricular requirement for capstone courses. Continuous improvements have been in progress to provide a systematic approach while remaining flexible for innovation. This has proved valuable in sustaining the continuity of the experience during the COVID-19 pandemic. Activities are organized each semester using project management techniques (plan, logbook, reports, and meetings). The instructor monitors and coaches these activities using a virtual platform MS TEAMS. Activities include an early presentation of the project proposal (week 2), a scheduled progress report presentation (week 4), a meeting with the instructor before delivering the activity to the selected community (weeks 4-8), a poster and a final presentation (weeks 12-14). Students also deliver a package with all the information, including in-person or virtual presentation or hands-on activity, pre- and post- surveys to the audience, interactions with K-12teachers, flyers and other materials (i.e., materials for demonstrations, activities). Schoolteachers frequently report on their impression or evaluation of the activities. Students gather and analyze surveys on the impact of their activities. All classmates review and peer grade deliverables from other teams. Students evaluate their teammates' performance in this project. Students provide a self-assessment of their individual experience. They earn up to 10% of the definitive grade of the course for this outreach project. This approach has proved to be fully sustainable, and with an overwhelming satisfaction of all the participants. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2022.

15.
J Dent Educ ; 86(10): 1405-1417, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2047683

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: This study examines the journey of US dental schools' predoctoral senior class of 2022, from the influences on and their motivations to pursue careers in dentistry, the aspects of their dental school experiences, plans upon graduation, and the investment in their careers. METHODS: The study is an analysis of the results of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Survey of Dental School Seniors, 2022 Graduating Class. Each year, ADEA surveys senior predoctoral students from the accredited US dental schools. Whenever feasible, the answers of the survey respondents from the 2022 class were compared with their 2017 counterparts and with the responses of 2022 predoctoral senior students of historically underrepresented race and ethnicity groups. RESULTS: The analysis revealed that 47% of the 2022 respondents decided to become a dentist before going to undergraduate college, more than the proportion of their 2017 colleagues (44%). When it comes to preparedness to practice dentistry, the responses indicated a high level of readiness to go into the profession. Nineteen percent of survey participants reported that the COVID-19 pandemic affected their professional plans immediately after graduation. Between 2017 and 2022, the share of survey respondents who planned to join a private practice immediately after graduation increased from 48% to 53%. Almost a third of the 2022 respondents who planned to go into private practice immediately upon graduation intended to join a dental service organization. When accounting for inflation, the average education debt for students graduating with debt who responded to ADEA 2022 survey was 11% lower from what the 2017 respondents reported. CONCLUSIONS: This study finds that some preferences changed from the 2017 cohort to the 2022 cohort toward deciding to go to dental school before college and joining a private practice upon graduation. Senior students responding to the ADEA survey in 2022 stated a high level of preparedness to practice dentistry. US dental schools pursued consistently their mission to educate, train, and graduate oral health professionals fully prepared to go into the profession.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Schools, Dental , Career Choice , Dentists , Education, Dental , Humans , Pandemics , Students, Dental , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2046085

ABSTRACT

Improving undergraduate STEM teaching for diverse students is dependent to some extent on increasing the representation of Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) and women in the ranks of faculty in engineering departments. However, new faculty members, whether they had postdoctoral training or not, report that they were not adequately prepared for academia. To address this need, a professional development program was developed for underrepresented doctoral and postdoctoral students, which focused on various strategies to be successful in teaching, research and service aspects of academic positions. The program included an intensive two-week summer session, with follow-up mentoring during the academic year, and was conducted from 2017 to 2020 with three cohorts of fellows recruited from across the country. To evaluate the impact of the program on the participants' perceptions of their preparation for academic careers, a follow up survey was sent in May 2021 to the three former cohorts of participants (n=61), and responses were received from 37 of them. The survey asked participants to reflect on areas that they felt most prepared for in their academic positions, and areas that they felt least prepared for. The survey also asked participants to discuss additional supports they would have liked to have been provided with to better prepare them given their current positions (academic, industry, etc.). Results from the survey indicated that 92% of participants found the professional development program prepared them for the responsibilities and expectations to succeed in academic positions. Over 90% agreed that the program prepared them for the application process for a tenure track search, and 89% agreed the program prepared them for the primary components of the startup package. In addition, participants reported that the program increased their preparation in developing teaching philosophy (100%), developing learning outcomes (97%), and using active learning strategies during teaching (91%). The majority agreed that the program helped prepare them to teach students with various cultural backgrounds, and to develop and use assessment strategies. Participants were also asked to discuss the impact of the Covid 19 pandemic on their career trajectory, and most of them reported being somewhat impacted (65%) to extremely impacted (29%). Participants reported few or no job openings, cancelations of interviews, delays in research which impacted the rate of completing degrees, and publications, which affected the participants' application competitiveness. Furthermore, working from home and balancing family and academic responsibilities affected their productivity. Based on the survey results, funds were secured to provide an additional day of professional training to cover any items not addressed during summer training, as well as any issues, challenges, or concerns they might have encountered while fulfilling their academic position. Thirty-three ACADEME fellows have indicated that they will participate in the new professional development, held in May 2022. Results from this analysis, and preliminary topics and outcomes of the supplemental activities are discussed. The findings contribute to the literature by increasing knowledge of specific challenges that new faculty encounter and can inform future efforts to support minorities and women in engineering doctoral programs. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2022.

17.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2045835

ABSTRACT

Despite helping to solve problems in society and the environment and enabling financial independence, a disproportionately low number of women enter engineering careers. Contributing factors may include a lack of female role models and activities that would increase the interest and confidence in STEM pathways during the developing years. Our university has initiated activities to provide exposure to role models and STEM activities to young females. This year Ron Burton Training Village (RBTV) started a new STEM program for female students grades 6-11 which would span over 6 years. The students would attend a different experience every weekend and conclude the yearly experience with a capstone project. Our university partnered with RBTV for one weekend workshop experience. The program was intended to be an in-person event but due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this program was conducted synchronously through Zoom virtual meetings. Our university is well known for “hands-on” learning, and we decided to keep the experience hands-on even if it had to be virtual. Students participated in STEM-related hands-on projects, connecting them to real life applications and boosting students' interests in different STEM disciplines. The program represents part of our university's ongoing efforts to interest young women in STEM. The core of the half-day workshop was three 45-minute STEM modules: Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. The students rotated between the different workshops. The three modules are presented in this paper. Civil Engineering project was Soil Testing, Electrical Engineering project was Food Battery, and Computer Science project was Smart Picker. 38 female students participated in this new STEM program. A survey was conducted at the end of the event to evaluate the content of the program. Students were excited about our program, learning, and experiencing different fields of engineering. We received very positive feedback from the students. The students really enjoyed the hands-on experience. Students reflected that they would like to participate in more STEM related activities in the future. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2022.

18.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2045532

ABSTRACT

The objective of this paper is to report on the preliminary implementation of educational activities and learning modules to improve the curriculum design of an introductory engineering course. The new curriculum, which was strategically designed to empower underrepresented minoritized (URM) students in STEM, incorporates complementary educational activities and academic interventions including 1) the use of EduGuide online coaching platform to equip students to pursue their personal growth goals, and 2) the implementation of professional development workshops to reinforce and influence the academic career decision-making and preparedness of first-year undergraduate students. The proposed curriculum design was applied to two class sections of an introductory engineering course with a total of 53 first-year students during the fall semester of 2020. Virtual teaching and learning environments were required across this institution to comply with the social distancing and lockdown requirements enacted by the federal government in response to the Covid-19 pandemic.. As part of the coaching platform, students in these two classes had access to an online mentoring community of 32 members from academia and industry. The professional development workshops were also provided in a virtual format yet synchronous format to support engagement with the facilitators and among peers. Students were asked to complete an online pre-semester survey, develop feedback essays, and respond to self-reflecting open-ended questions to gather substantial data to assess the impact of the implemented interventions and educational activities. From this study, the new curriculum design showed great potential in encouraging self-empowerment of minority students, which can consequently result in greater rates of persistence, motivation, and academic success. The university provided the required support to create an introductory university course under the Engineering Leadership and Education department to offer the new curriculum design to first-year undergraduate students interested in engineering programs. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2022.

19.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2045402

ABSTRACT

Designing strategies to implement diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) best practices have become a mainstream topic of conversation in the workplace. Surface-level changes are questioned, and more consequential actions and practices are sought out by employees (administrators and faculty in higher education) and their clientele (students) in industry and in academia. Both the academy and the corporate world have launched initiatives showcasing their efforts to recruit and retain diverse workforces within the STEM pipeline [1 - 2]. Still, various studies have demonstrated that women were more likely removed from the workforce or faced significant career setbacks as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic [3]. With a focus on women in Physics, this paper will provide a synthesis of the major research findings on the potential impact of the pandemic on both new and existing inequities faced by women on STEM career trajectories. These findings include those enlightened by informal discussions with women physicists at varying stages of their careers. We seek to uncover and identify how the pandemic may have further exacerbated those inequities already present in the workplace. By comparing and contrasting the underlying inequities and the role that the pandemic may have played in the corporate and academic workforces, we will explore and identify potential DEI solutions and best practices that organizations and institutions might implement to better support and retain their current workforces. For example, the pandemic has forced organizations and individuals to rethink work-life integration as they have attempted to achieve a new balance in what is often referred to as the new normal. Though neither academic nor industry STEM fields have yet found gender parity in their respective workforces, through a cross-sector comparison, this paper will address a fundamental shift that needs to occur in the way effort and performance is measured to retain and return female talent into the STEM pipeline. It is both timely and critical to take more immediate action to address gender-related DEI issues and their impact both pre- and post-pandemic on women in Physics and STEM career paths. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2022.

20.
Industrial Relations Journal ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2042838

ABSTRACT

This study examines precariousness among cultural workers during an ongoing crisis. A survey of Norway's largest trade union for performing artists 1 year into the pandemic shows that precariousness before the pandemic was amplified during the crisis. Lack of economic buffer and social benefits rendered economic insecurity most burdensome for those with precarious work arrangements. For future crises, we suggest that the authorities need to develop better targeted economic compensations for labour with precarious work arrangements.

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