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1.
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences ; 11(3):175-180, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2155668

ABSTRACT

Aim: We aimed to investigate the effects of COVID-19 related fears and marital adjustment on distress in pregnant women. Materials and Methods: This study is a cross-sectional descriptive study. The sample of the study consisted of 161 pregnant women who were followed up in a private hospital in Ankara between May and September 2020. Sociodemographic data form, Fear of COVID-19 Scale, Tilburg Pregnancy Distress Scale (TPDS), and Marital Adjustment Scale (MAS) were used in the study. Results: The mean age of the pregnant women in the sample was 29.64±4.47 years. While the rate of chronic disease was 8.7% (n=14), the rate of psychiatric disease was 2.5% (n=4). 7.5% (n=12) of the sample described their current pregnancy as unwanted pregnancy. The negative affect sub-dimension scores of TPDS were predicted by the Fear of COVID-19 Scale score (β=0.473, p

2.
Journal of Organizational Change Management ; 35(7):969-983, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2152402

ABSTRACT

Purpose>The COVID-19 outbreak has undoubtedly affected overall mental health. Thus, researching resilience is important, as it has been previously discussed as a means to protect people from mental health problems. This study aims to clarify whether survivors of a traumatic event (i.e. cancer survivors) are more resilient to living through another traumatic experience, such as COVID-19, compared to those who have never had such an experience. The study also examines the role of emotional creativity in this process.Design/methodology/approach>A quantitative research design was adopted. The data collection was performed through a survey (N = 338), which was conducted among two separate groups of participants. The first group (N = 152) included the survivors of a traumatic event (i.e. cancer survivors), and the second group (N = 186) included those who did not have such an experience.Findings>The results demonstrate that living through a traumatic experience results in a higher level of resilience during another traumatic experience (i.e. COVID-19), which is the result of higher post-traumatic growth. Moreover, emotional creativity is discussed as an explanatory variable that explains a significantly higher level of post-traumatic growth among survivors of a traumatic event.Originality/value>This research offers a better understanding of the effect of living through a traumatic event on post-traumatic growth and resilience in living through another traumatic experience. Moreover, post-traumatic growth is explained through emotional creativity improvement, which happens after experiencing a traumatic life event.

3.
Missouri Medicine ; 117(3):175-176, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2147824

ABSTRACT

Project ECHO started as a strategy to disseminate knowledge about the treatment of Hepatitis C in New Mexico,2 but has now, as described in this issue, has become a broad-based educational strategy with 24 unique programs supported by the Missouri Telehealth Network. The strategy used for health care surge control is called forward triaging which enables protections for patient, provider, and community from exposure.3 In the pre-COVID era, routine home-based patient-doctor telemedicine care was limited due to lack of reimbursement. [...]patient and physicians were striving to reduce in-person visits for public health reasons.

4.
Missouri Medicine ; 117(6):536-538, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2147610

ABSTRACT

[...]the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension study found that a diet low in fat and rich in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy resulted in lower systolic and diastolic blood pressures when compared to a standard western diet.6 What is the Western "American" Diet? The typical Western (American) diet is low in fruits and vegetables, and high in fat and sodium. [...]this diet consists of large portions, high calories, and excess sugar.3 This excess sugar accounts for more than 13% of the daily caloric intake with beverages constituting 47% of these added sugars.4 Other sources include cookies, cakes, and candy. [...]half of all Americans have a preventable chronic illness.3 According to the American Heart Association, 81 million American adults have cardiovascular disease which includes coronary artery disease or cerebrovascular disease. According to the CDC, 13.7 million children and adolescents are considered obese in the United States.8 Multiple studies have also shown that obesity during midlife increases the risk of developing dementia.

5.
Turkish Journal of Rheumatology ; 37(4):559-565, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2146612

ABSTRACT

The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disease to be a global public health emergency in January 2020. Fear, anxiety, and concerns have been the primary psychological effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, as they have been in past pandemics such as hemagglutinin type 1 and neuraminidase type 1 (H1N1), severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and Ebola.1-3 As the mortality death toll caused by COVID-19 continues to rise, the number of individuals who experience elevated and prolonged fear and anxiety appears to be growing, as well.4 A phobia is a type of anxiety condition marked by a persistent, irrational dread of a certain item, person, animal, activity, or circumstance. During the COVID-19 pandemic period, individuals are typically frightened of becoming infected with COVID-19 and the term "coronaphobia" is first appeared in the literature.6,7 It is described as persistent and severe anxiety of the novel coronavirus and maybe a new emerging phobia specific to COVID-19 as one of the DSM-V-specified phobias.8 Coronaphobia is associated with excessive concern about physiological symptoms, significant stress about personal and occupational loss, increased reassurance and safety seeking behaviors, and avoidance of public places and situations, resulting in significant impairment in daily life functioning according to a review of relevant studies.9 Given the fact that COVID-19 pandemic affects psychological, emotional, and mental status, it is critical to recognize early indications of coronaphobia to give timely support to people who have severe coronaphobia.10 The identification of risk factors and potential associated diseases for coronaphobia may help in the management of this issue. No significant differences were found among the RA groups using biological drugs, the RA group using non-biological drugs, and the control group in terms of age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and marital status.

6.
Progress in Health Sciences ; 12(2):1-9, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2125305

ABSTRACT

In turn, studies by Jellink and Snyder showed that MDD remains at 1-2% among children in the prepubertal period. [...]among adolescents, it increases to the level of 5-8%, which may suggest that the risk of developing the disease increases with age and adolescence Sexual [7]. According to Burmaher et al., 30-70% of children who experienced the first episode of depression will experience a second (or subsequent) episode in childhood, adolescence or adulthood [8]. Ravens-Sieberer et al [15] estimate that 24% of adolescents suffer from anxiety disorders (about 14% before the pandemic), and over 60% of children and adolescents may struggle with depression. other studies found that * report that one-third of 3- to 18-year-old children and adolescents were clingy, inattentive, irritable and worried (Jiao et al. 20020) [16] * found that 23% of second- to 6th-grade children had depressive symptoms and 19% had anxiety symptoms during the pandemic (Xie et al. 2020) [17] * report that 44% of 12- to 18-year-olds displayed depressive symptoms, 37% showed anxiety, and 31% had both types of symptoms while (Zhou et al. 2020) [18] * high levels of depressive and anxiety symptoms were recently replicated by (Duan et al. 2020) [19] * two non-representative studies from India with children and adolescents aged 5-18 years (Yeasmin et al 2002;Saurabh et al. 2020) [20,21] * one study from Brazil with children and adolescents from 6 to 12 years underline the negative impact of the pandemic on the mental health of children Garcia de Avila et al 2020) [22] * they found that children and adolescents experienced severe psychological distress, such as worries, helplessness, anxiety, and fear. [...]recent nationwide studies from the US reported worsening psychological well-being and behavioural health of children and adolescents compared to the time before the pandemic [Patrick et al 2020;Gassman-Pines et al 2020) [23,24] * two European studies from Italy and Spain found that irritability, and loneliness in children and adolescents increased during the COVID19 lockdown (Ezpeleta et al. 2020;Orgilés et al 2020) [25,26] and one non-representative survey among parents of German children and adolescents (Langmeyer et al 2020) [27]. If one of the monozygotic twins is depressed, the other is also at 70% risk of developing the disorder. * biochemical processes in the brain * the influence of the family atmosphere, including the abuse of alcohol or other psychoactive substances by family members, domestic violence, chronic illness of one of the parents, another family member or the child himself, loss of a loved one due to death or, for example, parents' divorce, mental and physical situations or sexual abuse by caregivers, chronic marital conflict of parents, neglect, lack of interest, hostility and emotional rejection, excessive parental control, overburdening the child with too much responsibility (child-parent change of roles), difficult financial situation and social isolation of the family, * the influence of the external environment - the social environment, stress caused by the child's school situation, including, for example, excessive demands made by teachers, the atmosphere of tension, hostility, lack of support, etc. in school or class, peer violence by teachers, school failures (e.g., failed exam), unfair grading * low self-esteem - a depressive child will explain negative, difficult events with its own constant properties, and thus it will judge self in an overly critical way.

7.
Thorax ; 77(Suppl 1):A117, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2118247

ABSTRACT

IntroductionStarting secondary school is a big step for any child and their family but particularly so if they have a chronic condition such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Hospital teams can assist with the preparation required for the transition. CF is different from other chronic conditions with respect to holding transition events, as face to face events are not possible due to the risk of cross-infection of different organisms between patients. In order to overcome this, the CF team at Alder Hey Children’s Hospital created a virtual event named ‘MI7’ (Moving Into year 7).MethodEvents were held via video conferencing software and questionnaires sent to all participants before the event and afterwards. All patients in year 6 cared for by the Alder Hey CF network were invited to participate with a maximum of 7 young people per group. Packs were sent out beforehand. Sessions consisted of ice-breaker games and CF team led discissions.ResultsA pilot event was held in 2019. This was well-received and follow-up from the families was sought after the first term at secondary school. Unfortunately, due to the COVID pandemic, the event could not be held in 2020, but it went ahead in 2021 and 2022.There was a distinct difference between the event held in 2019 and 2021/22, in that everyone (the hospital team members, and the patients and their families) was much more familiar with participating in a virtual event, due to the way this practice had become commonplace during the COVID pandemic.Overall 22 people have participated in these events to date. 25% described being worried about going to secondary school. All young people gave at least one thing that they were worried about and the most common finding was getting lost (21%). The most common CF related worry was regarding taking creon and 12% cited this as a concern. Less than 25% of all concerns given related to CF with the remainder being more generic concerns.All participants stated that they enjoyed the event and most found it useful.ConclusionTransition events to help this patient population move from primary to secondary school are feasible, enjoyable for young people with CF and useful.

8.
Journal of Multidisciplinary Research ; 15(1):87-101, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2112168

ABSTRACT

Drivers such as COVID-19, the rising geriatric population, the increased prevalence of chronic diseases, and a focus on personalized care facilitate the recent expansion of remote medicine. The response to this manifests through the growth of telehealth. However, the inability to conduct conclusive physical tests makes monitoring, diagnosing, and treating patients restricted. Wearable devices can remotely provide valuable data on patient temperature, pulmonary condition, cardiovascular condition, and blood pressure in their current technological capabilities. However, concerns for secure patient health data, interoperability between devices, and inconsistencies in the quality of information continue to limit their widespread acceptance in healthcare. This scoping review will assess the impact of wearable devices in enhancing the capabilities of remote health and safety monitoring.

9.
Frontline Gastroenterology ; 13(Suppl 1):A2-A3, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2064203

ABSTRACT

O2 Table 1Number of television programmes matching each search term (original search)Table includes all matches to given term, and is not adjusted for overlap where more than one search led to the same programme.Search term Total programmes in two-year period ‘Relevant’ clips (score >6) Crohns 189 43 Colitis 92 18 ‘Inflammatory bowel disease’ 32 6 Stoma 71 4 Ileostomy 12 6 O2 Table 2Themes identified within ‘relevant’ programmesClassifications relate to the final non-overlapping list (n=58), but a given programme may feature in more than one category.Term Description Number of programmes REAL Someone on a reality TV programme mentions their IBD 12 MED A factual/reality medical programme shows IBD 13 FAM A ‘famous’ person is interviewed and discusses their IBD 11 MAG A TV magazine programme has a section about an IBD-related issue 7 DOC A documentary with main focus of IBD or related issue 10 NEWS A news programme 13 HOLB A medical drama mentioning IBD 6 COVID A person with IBD is featured in the context of the impact of the pandemic on people with chronic conditions 7 AMY Documentary, interviews etc with Strictly Come Dancing performer Amy Dowden 4 CIRCLE Episodes of The Circle and subsequent interviews featuring contestant Georgina Elliott, with IBD and previously a stoma 2 DRAMA NON medical drama or comedy with IBD mention 1 Summary and ConclusionsIBD is underrepresented on television compared to other chronic conditions. Notwithstanding different search terms may lead to the same programme, there were fewer than 396 IBD-related clips identified in a two-year period. This is significantly lower than other conditions such as diabetes (3,138), asthma (2,236) and epilepsy (959).Only 58 of the IBD-related clips were assessed as relevant for this project.Depictions of IBD mainly featured in news, factual medical or documentary programmes with few fictional portrayals in dra a or comedy.Despite focus on the fear and uncertainty of living with IBD, there were also positive messages concerning the value of open communication with family and friends, and having goals to focus on.Framing living with IBD using more extreme language may be due to television’s desire for compelling narratives, rather than an accurate reflection of people’s lived experience. However, children and young people with IBD may still benefit from seeing well-known role models discussing their condition and achieving their ambitions despite the challenges.Further research into use of and benefit of TV and social media in support and education should be considered.

10.
Journal of Integrated Care ; 30(4):363-372, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2063200

ABSTRACT

Purpose>The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated the urgency of better chronic disease management and the importance of making it an integral part of the recovery agenda in Europe. This paper aims to explore the shift towards digital and integrated care systems in Europe.Design/methodology/approach>In this viewpoint paper the Expert Group for Integrated Care and Digital Health Europe (EGIDE) group argues that an orchestrated shift towards integrated care holds the solution to the chronic disease pandemic.Findings>The development of integrated care cannot happen without shifting towards a digitalised healthcare system via large-scale initiatives like the European Health Data Space (EHDS) and the involvement of all stakeholders.Originality/value>The EGIDE group has identified some foundational principles, which can guide the way to realise the full potential of the EHDS for integrated care and can support the involved stakeholders’ thinking.

11.
International Journal of Caring Sciences ; 15(2):1521-1527, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2057836

ABSTRACT

Background: Many university students gained knowledge about COVID-19 pandemic through social media and distance education. Their knowledge, attitude, and behavior related pandemic can be evaluated to take effective measures. Objectives: This study developed the COVID-19 New Coronavirus Awareness Scale (CV19S-CAS) and determined the psychometric properties in university students. Methodology: The sample comprised 577 Turkish university students via an online survey. The items of the CV19S-CAS constructed based on the review of the literature, and expert evaluations. The psychometric tests conducted for the reliability and validity properties. Results: After the expert review and pilot study, the reliability and validity analysis conducted. According to the exploratory factor analysis, the CV19S-CAS consisted of four sub-scales (knowledge, protection, attitude, behavior), and the sub-scales explained 46.1% of the total variance. Six items excluded from the scale because the factor loads were below 0.30. Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the CV19S-CAS-26 items was 0.87;four sub-scales were 0.62, 0.57, 0.71, and 0.82, respectively. Conclusion: The Five-point Likert-CV19S-CAS, a 26-item scale, with four factors and sub-scales, is a valid and reliable scale for university students. It can also use for the level of COVID-19 awareness among the general population.

12.
International Journal of Care and Caring ; 6(3):355-355–377, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2054223

ABSTRACT

Globally, life expectancy is increasing, as is the need for effective care responses to chronic health conditions, global emergencies and health disparities. Alongside this is a shortage of skilled caregivers. This four-country qualitative study investigates the views of ‘care’ and ‘care careers’ of Generation Z (the next generation to join the workforce). Four cross-cultural themes emerged: conceptualising care;objects and subjects of care;recognising the challenges of care;and appreciating care work. Discussed in relation to Tronto’s analysis of care, these themes illuminate Generation Z’s commitment to care and highlight the need for organisational and political action to attract young people to care careers.

13.
American Journal of Public Health ; 112:S253-S255, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2046525

ABSTRACT

Although the United States is one of the wealthiest countries in the world and a leader in biomedical innovation, its health care system is consistently ranked among the worst in terms of cost and health outcomes. Americans have short life expectancies, high infant mortality and obesity rates, and soaring chronic disease rates compared with other wealthy nations. In 2021, the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) was charged with examining what it would take to improve US primary care. The NAM report described the practice of siloing public health from primary care or treating these areas as separate fields of scientific inquiry, practice, and billable service.1 NAM identified this separation as a key driver of poor health outcomes and health inequities in the United States. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) examined similar phenomena in a 2012 report, noting how the two fields tend to operate independently, despite complementary functions and common goals.2Where these silos persist, we see communication and process breakdowns at the point of care. For instance, when large swaths of Americans turned to trusted primary care providers for COVID-19 vaccine insights, their primary care providers did not always have the most up-todate information, in part because of a lack of interprofessional cohesion (including fragmented public health messaging and data systems). If we are to remedy such issues, a substantive paradigm shift must take place: We must move toward what DeSalvo et al.3 termed "Public Health 3.0." In this model, multiple sectors, specialties, and stakeholders form coalitions to mobilize data, people power, and resources in a strategic manner to advance health for all. To be truly strategic, we must think carefully about how to leverage nurses-who care for patients across the lifespan and in nearly all public health nursing (PHN) and primary care settings-within these coalitions.The 2021 NAM report urges health care teams to undertake the mission of integrating systems. However, NAM stops short of describing exactly how teams ought to accomplish this aim and the proposed makeup ofsaid teams. Like any group project, success will depend on the ability of teams to identify leaders and clearly delineate responsibilities. The purpose of this editorial is to explore the potential of PHN and primary care nurses and to describe the roles they might assume in the collaborative integration of their respective silos.

14.
The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine ; 95(1):1-2, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2046496

ABSTRACT

[...]in addition to the direct biological consequences of SARS-CoV2 infection on the brain, chronic stress associated with the COVID-19 pandemic impacts similar neuronal signaling pathways in the CNS and PNS that hamper normal physiological function. Davis et al. examine how increased reactive oxygen species in the embryonic brain generated due to prenatal stress affect the morphology and activity of neuronal cells during development and in mature brains. Available from:https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2020/report-october World Health Organization. .2013..Who releases guidance on mental health care after trauma..

15.
Drug Safety ; 45(10):1199, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2046078

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Adverse skin reactions, either immediate or delayed, were reported following COVID-19 vaccines [1]. Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU), a persisting urticaria beyond six weeks, has been rarely reported. These skin conditions present the challenge of the possibility of taking or not of the second dose and also its nature. Objective: To report cases of CSU after receiving vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 and the outcome after taking their second dose. Methods: We performed a research on the database of the pharmacovigilance center from March 2021 to March 2022 using the keywords: urticaria, covid vaccine. The inclusion criteria were - persisting urticaria beyond six weeks after immunization - no urticaria prior the immunization during at least one month - second dose taken Non inclusion criteria were: - CSU not related to the vaccine Results: We retained three cases of CSU following COVID19 vaccine with second dose. There were two women and one man. Their age varied from 24 to 48 years. Two patients had chronic disease: one presented dysthyroidism, and the other presented asthma. The delay of occurrence of CSU varied from few hours to five days. The CSU in the three cases was not associated with other symptoms such as angioedema or dyspnea. In the three cases, the use of antihistamine drugs was only effective in reducing pruritus without complete release of urticaria. Follow up of the patients showed that they had their second dose after a period that varied between one and six months. They took their second dose while they continue to present urticaria. In the three patients, there was no exacerbation or specific complications. Conclusion: Our study showed that the administration of the second dose in patients that developed CSU after the previous vaccine can be considered safe and is advisable. Most of cases of exacerbation or worsening of CSU reported in the literature appear to be transient and can be managed by antihistamine therapies [2].

16.
The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine ; 95(1):165-170, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2045794

ABSTRACT

The relationship between chronic stress and chronic disease (including mental illness) is well established: HPA-axis hyperactivity leads to hormonal dysregulation of primary mediators (eg, glucocorticoids, cytokines, etc.), allostatic overload, and neurological degradation, followed by clinical manifestations of disease. Amid the largest public health crisis of the century lay a myriad of challenges pushing people beyond their limit. From experiencing loss of connection or dealing with loss of life to financial shocks of COVID-19 lockdowns or infection by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, stress is at an all-time high, threatening both brain and mental health at scale. Fortunately, there is a way forward: the neuroscience of resilience teaches us that it is possible to resist, recover, and redirect the brain from trauma to re-establish balance in the body and improve well-being. At the same time, health follows a social gradient: adverse and protective psychosocial factors are shaped by wider social and economic determinants of health. This paper argues the neurobiology of stress is not separate from health disparities linked to adverse factors (ie, stress) created by complex social and economic contexts. Therefore, the field of neuroscience is challenged to inform multi-context and multi-level approaches and engage with decision-makers to enact policies and interventions aimed at promoting the resilient element in a wider population health context. Undoubtedly, achieving such a goal for current and future generations to benefit and lead healthier lives requires a heroic effort from all key stakeholders. The cost of willful neglect to resolve these issues is too expensive.

17.
The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine ; 95(3):367-370, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2045730

ABSTRACT

Telehealth has been a long-awaited advancement with the potential to improve efficiency, convenience, and quality in healthcare. However, as telehealth becomes integrated into routine clinical care, it is imperative to consider the practical and ethical implications that could undermine or devalue care delivery. The medical profession must ensure that it is implemented judiciously and with robust quality standards, guided by fair and equitable policies that balance patient autonomy with rigorous standards of care and access. Such a system must recognize the opportunity for more patient input as stakeholders to tailor care to their needs and preferences, while also acknowledging the risk of suboptimal care if convenience is prioritized over quality. More studies of optimal care models are needed to integrate data in terms of both stakeholder input and outcomes.

18.
American Journal of Public Health ; 112:S245-S249, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2045674

ABSTRACT

Yet, lack of vaccine uptake puts in peril the goal of controlling the spread ofthe virus, particularly among communities that are at greatest risk of contracting and dying ofthe illness.8 The reasons for the lack of COVID-19 vaccine uptake among some communities in the United States are multifaceted, some of which include concerns about the safety or effectiveness ofthe vaccines, the speed in which the vaccines were developed, misinformation about the vaccines, and systemic barriers affecting community access (i.e., online appointment systems, inadequate transportation, and lack of child care).9,10 For many communities of color, including African American and Latinx individuals, COVID-19 vaccine reluctance is rooted in both historical and contemporary experiences of systemic racism, forced sterilization of Latinx women in California, the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male (renamed as the US Public Health Service Syphilis Study at Tuskegee), marginalization, medical distrust, neglect from the scientific and medical communities, poor public health infrastructure, and institutional abandonment.2,3,10 In addition to those reasons, the politicization ofthe vaccine development process and efforts to increase vaccination after the 2020 US presidential election have deepened distrust among some communities. A 2021 Kaiser Family Foundation survey found that 79% of US adults who have not yet been vaccinated say they would likely turn to a trusted nurse, doctor, or other health care provider when deoiding wherher to ger a vaooination.11 As health oare professionals, nurses and other public health workers are often a patient's first clinical contact and are among the most trusted sources of information about the vaccines. Nurses are leading the nation's vaccine administration efforts and, to many, are the most accessible source of information for questions about safety, side effects, and benefits.11,12 To be effective, nurses and other public health workers require an understanding of the reasons that prevent people from getting vaccinated and have practical tools to support people with their decisions regarding if, when, and how they get vaccinated against COVID-19. The relationship between the stages in the framework are cyclical, and individuals can move in either direction at different points in time when exposed to new information tog., negative news reports) or negative experiences (e.g., a family member who had an adverse reaction).

19.
The Journal of Headache and Pain ; 23(1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2038632

ABSTRACT

Headache is among the most frequent symptoms persisting or newly developing after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) as part of the so-called long COVID syndrome. The knowledge on long COVID headache is still limited, however growing evidence is defining the features of this novel condition, in particular regarding clinical characteristics, some pathophysiological mechanisms and first treatment recommendations. Long COVID headache can present in the form of worsening of a preexisting primary headache, or, more specifically, in the form of a new (intermittent or daily) headache starting during the acute infection or after a delay. It often presents together with other long COVID symptoms, most frequently with hyposmia. It can manifest with a migrainous or, more frequently, with a tension-type-like phenotype. Persistent activation of the immune system and trigeminovascular activation are thought to play a role. As there are virtually no treatment studies, treatment currently is largely guided by the existing guidelines for primary headaches with the corresponding phenotype. The present report, a collaborative work of the international group of the Junior Editorial Board of The Journal of Headache and Pain aims to summarize the most recent evidence about long COVID headache and suggests approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of this disorder.

20.
American Family Physician ; 106(3):318, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2033979

ABSTRACT

A collaboration between AFP and the Lown Institute promotes a vision of delivering health care that is based on the evidence, balanced in its approach, and focused on the patient.

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