Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 720
Filter
2.
Med Drug Discov ; 16: 100146, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2105578

ABSTRACT

In malaria endemic countries, coinfections and cotransmissions of different viral pathogens are widely reported. Prior studies have shown that malaria can trigger the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation in the body. Besides, the altered immunity due to malaria could increase susceptibility to acquire co-circulating viruses like SARS-CoV-2 or vice versa during pandemic times. The dual burden of pathogens can deteriorate health by inducing disease severity. There are no or limited antiviral therapies available against EBV and SARS-CoV-2. Exploring the novel antimalarials for checking antiviral efficacy and using them in such cases could be the efficient approach of 'hitting two birds with one stone'. We investigated the antiviral potency of medicine for a malaria venture's malaria box containing 400 drug-like or probe-like compounds with experimentally proven antimalarial activity. We utilized a molecular docking approach to screen these compounds against crucial proteins- EBNA1 of EBV and RdRp of SARS-CoV-2 respectively. Based on binding affinity we shortlisted the top three compounds for each protein. Further, for validation of complex stability and binding, the protein-ligand complex is subjected to 100 ns molecular dynamic simulation. All the compounds showed stable binding with respective proteins. Based on binding free energies, involvement of important residues from target sites, and ADMET properties of compounds, the top ligand for each protein is selected. Ligand B (MMV665879) for EBNA1 (ΔGbind = -183.54 kJ/mol) and Ligand E (MMV665918) for RdRp (ΔGbind = -172.23 kJ/mol) could act as potential potent inhibitors. These antimalarial compounds can hence be utilized for further experimental investigation as antivirals against EBV and SARS-CoV-2.

3.
Gaceta Medica de Caracas ; 130(3):500-507, 2022.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2101068

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The role ofcoinfections in patients with COVID-19 has been dismissed, and their role in their prognosis and outcomes is unknown. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study of 306 adults infected by SARS-CoV-2 by antigenic or molecular test. The main objective was to evaluate the role of nosocomial coinfections in patients with COVID-19, follow-up from July 2020 to January 2021. Results: There was a higher frequency of the male gender 78 % in relation to the female 22 %, the accumulated mortalities in the presence of infection nosocomial for those under 60 were 5 (14.7 %), between 60 and 70 (28.57 %) and those over 70 years old 73 (59.8 %), showing that in those over 70 years old it doubles those between 60 and 70 and triples those under 60 years of age, all analyzes showing statistical significance, p<0.005. Discussion: The present study showed an adequate correlation between the presence of nosocomial infection and higher mortality in those who presented it, especially those older than 70 years. Conclusions: Coinfection at the time of diagnosis of COVID-19 is relatively frequent. The implicit mortality that nosocomial infections have in the COVID-19 patient makes it necessary to review care protocols and carry out epidemiological and hospital surveillance activities in these patients. Such findings could be essential to define the role of empirical antimicrobial therapy or prevention strategies. Administration at the time of suspicion of a co-infection, always in an individualized manner and based on the profiles of each health institution. © 2022 Academia Nacional de Medicina. All rights reserved.

4.
Erciyes Medical Journal ; 44(6):540-543, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2100488

ABSTRACT

World Health Organization data indicate that as of April 2022, 6.2 million deaths have been reported worldwide due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In Turkiye, official statistics indicate some 15 million cases and a death toll of 98,660. It is important that clinicians consider the possibility of the co-occurrence of other respiratory microorganisms with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, the virus that causes COVID-19, when managing treatment, particularly severe COVID-19 patients. The burden and effect of a secondary infection may be significant, especially in patients with chronic disease and advanced age. Proper attention to potential co-infections can prevent COVID-19 progression and the development of complications. Copyright ©C 2022 by Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine.

5.
Pathogens ; 11(11)2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099700

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aims to reflect the prevalence of non-SARS-CoV-2 respiratory pathogens and co-infection with SARS-CoV-2 in the early stage of the COVID-19 epidemic, considering SARS-CoV-2 broke out during influenza season and its symptoms resemble those of influenza. METHODS: A total of 685 nucleic acid samples of respiratory pathogens were collected from 1 November 2019 to 20 January 2020 and were detected by the 13 Respiratory Pathogen Multiplex Detection Kit and Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Nucleic Acid Diagnostic Kit. RESULTS: In Wuhan, human rhinovirus was the most frequent infectious pathogen in November (31.5%) and human respiratory syncytial virus appeared the most in December and January (37.1%, 8.6%, respectively). Detection of SARS-CoV-2 first appeared from January 1 to January 10. Generally, 115 patients of 616 patients (18.7%) from Wuhan were infected with SARS-CoV-2, and only two children were co-infected with other respiratory pathogens. In Taiyuan, influenza A virus was detected most frequently in December and January (30.3%, 12%, respectively) without infection of SARS-CoV-2. CONCLUSIONS: Some cases diagnosed with influenza before routine nucleic acid testing of SARS-CoV-2 were attributed to COVID-19. Co-infection between SARS-CoV-2 and other non-SARS-CoV-2 respiratory pathogens existed in the early stage of COVID-19 epidemic.

6.
Int J Gen Med ; 15: 7995-8001, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098942

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Influenza B viruses are less common than influenza A viruses in most seasons and cause relatively milder forms of infection that are less studied. We witnessed a dominance of influenza B in Shijiazhuang, China, in the 2021-2022 winter season. In this study, we comparatively investigated the severe and critical influenza B in pediatric patients. Methods: Children who were hospitalized from December 2021 to January 2022 and diagnosed with influenza B were included in this study. Those who tested positive for COVID-19 were excluded. Demographic data, clinical features, underlying medical conditions, laboratory testing results, and treatment outcomes were retrieved and analyzed retrospectively. Disease severity was classified as severe or critical according to Chinese expert consensus on diagnosis and treatment of influenza in children. Results: A significantly greater proportion of patients with critical influenza had extra-pulmonary complications and bacterial coinfections. Children with critical influenza B had substantially higher levels of procalcitonin and lactate dehydrogenase, a markedly higher neutrophil percentage and a significantly lower CD4+ lymphocyte percentage. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that, to effectively manage critical influenza B, therapeutic regimens should consist of organ-specific supportive care, antibiotic application if bacterial coinfection is present, and anti-inflammatory and immune-boosting treatments.

7.
Microbiol Spectr ; : e0115022, 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097931

ABSTRACT

Recent studies suggest the enhancement of liver injury in COVID-19 patients infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV). Hepatocytes express low levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the SARS-CoV-2 entry receptor, raising the possibility of HCV-SARS-CoV-2 coinfection in the liver. This work aimed to explore whether HCV and SARS-CoV-2 coinfect hepatocytes and the interplay between these viruses. We demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2 coinfects HCV-infected Huh7.5 (Huh7.5HCV) cells. Both viruses replicated efficiently in the coinfected cells, with HCV replication enhanced in coinfected compared to HCV-mono-infected cells. Strikingly, Huh7.5HCV cells were eight fold more susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 pseudoviruses than naive Huh7.5 cells, suggesting enhanced SARS-CoV-2 entry into HCV-preinfected hepatocytes. In addition, we observed increased binding of spike receptor-binding domain (RBD) protein to Huh7.5HCV cells, as well as enhanced cell-to-cell fusion of Huh7.5HCV cells with spike-expressing Huh7.5 cells. We explored the mechanism of enhanced SARS-CoV-2 entry and identified an increased ACE2 mRNA and protein levels in Huh7.5HCV cells, primary hepatocytes, and in data from infected liver biopsies obtained from database. Importantly, higher expression of ACE2 increased HCV infection by enhancing its binding to the host cell, underscoring its role in the HCV life cycle as well. Transcriptome analysis revealed that shared host signaling pathways were induced in HCV-SARS-CoV-2 coinfection. This study revealed complex interactions between HCV and SARS-CoV-2 infections in hepatocytes, which may lead to the increased liver damage recently reported in HCV-positive COVID-19 patients. IMPORTANCE Here, we provide the first experimental evidence for the coexistence of SARS-CoV-2 infection with HCV, and the interplay between them. The study revealed a complex relationship of enhancement between the two viruses, where HCV infection increased the expression of the SARS-CoV-2 entry receptor ACE2, thus facilitating SARS-CoV-2 entry, and potentially, also HCV entry. Thereafter, SARS-CoV-2 infection enhanced HCV replication in hepatocytes. This study may explain the aggravation of liver damage that was recently reported in COVID-19 patients with HCV coinfection and suggests preinfection with HCV as a risk factor for severe COVID-19. Moreover, it highlights the possible importance of HCV treatment for coinfected patients. In a broader view, these findings emphasize the importance of identifying coinfecting pathogens that increase the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and that may accelerate COVID-19-related co-morbidities.

8.
Vacunas ; 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096124

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii, especially carbapenem-resistant (CR) strains, pose important challenges in patients with COVID-19 infection. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated co-infection and antimicrobial resistance patterns, as well as the role of A. baumannii in the outcome of patients with COVID-19. Materials and methods: Between February 2019 and January 2021, 141 patients with A. baumannii infections were detected from seven different hospitals (A to G) in Arak, Iran, and the antibacterial susceptibility pattern of these isolates was evaluated using disk diffusion and E-test methods. Forty-seven of these patients were co-infected with COVID-19. During the study, the data about the clinical course, demographic data, and the role of A. baumannii infections in the mortality rate of COVID-19 patients were collected. Results: Hospitals A and B reported the most patients, with 53 (38%) and 47 (33%), respectively. Additionally, most cases (105 cases, 75%) were reported from surgical and general ICUs. Mechanical ventilators were detected as predisposing factors in 95 (67%) patients, and infection was detected in 20% of patients on the 10th day after intubation. All of the A. baumannii isolates were resistant to different classes of antibiotics, such as carbapenems. Notably, 33% (47 patients) were also positive for COVID-19, and 68% (32 patients) died due to the infection. Statistical analysis showed a significant role of A. baumannii co-infection in the mortality rate of COVID-19 patients (p-value 0.05). Conclusion: co-infection with A. baumannii is one of the most important challenges in COVID-19 patients. Our results showed that all isolated bacteria were CR and significantly increased mortality rates in COVID-19 patients.


Antecedentes: Las infecciones causadas por Acinetobacter baumannii, especialmente las cepas resistentes a carbapenem (CR), plantean desafíos importantes en pacientes con infección por COVID-19. Por lo tanto, en el presente estudio investigamos los patrones de coinfección y resistencia a los antimicrobianos, así como el papel de A. baumannii en el desenlace de los pacientes con COVID-19.Materiales y métodos: entre febrero de 2019 y enero de 2021, se detectaron 141 pacientes con infecciones por A. baumannii de siete hospitales diferentes (A a G) en Arak, Irán, y se evaluó el patrón de susceptibilidad antibacteriana de estos aislamientos mediante difusión en disco y E- métodos de prueba. Cuarenta y siete de estos pacientes estaban coinfectados con COVID-19. Durante el estudio, se recopilaron datos sobre datos demográficos, curso clínico y el papel de las infecciones por A. baumannii en la tasa de mortalidad de los pacientes con COVID-19.Resultados: Los hospitales A y B reportaron mayor número de pacientes con 53 (38%) y 47 (44%), respectivamente. Además, la mayoría de los casos (105 casos, 75%) se informaron desde la UCI quirúrgica y general. Los ventiladores mecánicos se detectaron como factores predisponentes en 95 (67%) pacientes y la infección se detectó en el 20% de los pacientes al décimo día después de la intubación. Todos los aislamientos de A. baumannii fueron resistentes a diferentes clases de antibióticos, como los carbapenémicos. El 33,6% (47 pacientes) también dieron positivo a COVID-19, y el 68% (32 pacientes) fallecieron a causa de la infección. El análisis estadístico mostró un papel significativo de la coinfección por A. baumannii en la tasa de mortalidad de los pacientes con COVID-19 (valor de p 0,05).Conclusión: la coinfección con A. baumannii es uno de los desafíos más importantes en pacientes positivos para COVID-19. Nuestros resultados mostraron que todas las bacterias aisladas eran CR y aumentaron significativamente las tasas de mortalidad en pacientes con COVID-19.

9.
Indian Pediatrics ; 59(8):617-619, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2094809

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the outcome of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection in children and adolescents with tuberculosis. Method(s): We analyzed hospital records for the period May, 2020 to September, 2021 for children who were severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) positive or SARS-CoV-2 antibody positive. They were divided into two groups viz., those with tuberculosis (tuberculosis group) and those without tuberculosis (non-TB group). Demographic information, symptoms, and outcomes of COVID-19 were compared between the two groups. Result(s): Median (IQR) age of participants was 11 (8,14) and 4.5 (2,9) year for the tuberculosis and non-TB groups, respectively. 93.5% and 36.1% of children were asymptomatic in the tuberculosis and non-TB group, respectively. No variable in the study was significantly associated with COVID-19 positivity in children with tuberculosis. No difference was found in the outcomes of COVID-19 infection in children having tuberculosis. Conclusion(s): No differences were noted in the outcomes of COVID-19 infection in children having tuberculosis. Copyright © 2022, Indian Academy of Pediatrics.

10.
Pathogens ; 11(11)2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090298

ABSTRACT

Bacterial co-infection in COVID-19 patients significantly contributes to the worsening of the prognosis based on morbidity and mortality. Information on the co-infection profile in such patients could help to optimize treatment. The purpose of this study was to describe bacterial co-infections associated with microbiological, clinical, and laboratory data to reduce or avoid a secondary infection. A retrospective cohort study was conducted at Sant'Anna and San Sebastiano Hospital from January 2020 to December 2021. Bacterial co-infection was detected in 14.3% of the COVID-19-positive patients. The laboratory findings on admission showed significant alterations in the median D-dimer, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and lactate dehydrogenase values compared to normal values. All inflammatory markers were significantly elevated. The most common pathogens isolated from blood cultures were E. faecalis and S. aureus. Instead, the high prevalence of respiratory tract infections in the COVID-19 patients was caused by P. aeruginosa (41%). In our study, 220 (82.4%) of the COVID-19 patients received antimicrobial treatment. Aminoglycosides and ß-lactams/ß-lactamase inhibitors showed the highest resistance rates. Our results showed that older age, underlying conditions, and abnormal laboratory parameters can be risk factors for co-infection in COVID-19 patients. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of bacterial pathogen infection provides evidence on the importance, for the clinicians, to rationalize and individualize antibiotic usage.

11.
Pathogens ; 11(11)2022 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090296

ABSTRACT

COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA) has had a high incidence. In addition, it has been associated with prolonged hospital stays, as well as several predisposing risk factors, such as fungal factors (nosocomial organism, the size of the conidia, and the ability of the Aspergillus spp. of colonizing the respiratory tract), environmental factors (remodeling in hospitals, use of air conditioning and negative pressure in intensive care units), comorbidities, and immunosuppressive therapies. In addition to these factors, SARS-CoV-2 per se is associated with significant dysfunction of the patient's immune system, involving both innate and acquired immunity, with reduced CD4+ and CD8+ T cell counts and cytokine storm. Therefore, this review aims to identify the factors influencing the fungus so that coinfection with SARS-CoV-2 can occur. In addition, we analyze the predisposing factors in the fungus, host, and the immune response alteration due to the pathogenicity of SARS-CoV-2 that causes the development of CAPA.

12.
Biomedicines ; 10(11)2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089996

ABSTRACT

This study was conducted to evaluate the distribution of respiratory viral pathogens in the emergency department during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Between May 2020 and September 2022, patients aged between 0.1 and 98 years arrived at the emergency department of Asia University Hospital, and samples from nasopharyngeal swabs were tested by the FilmArrayTM Respiratory Panel (RP). SARS-CoV-2 positivity was subsequently retested by the cobas Liat system. There were 804 patients for whom the FilmArrayTM RP was tested, and 225 (27.9%) of them had positive results for respiratory viruses. Rhinovirus/enterovirus was the most commonly detected pathogen, with 170 (61.8%) cases, followed by adenovirus with 38 (13.8%), SARS-CoV-2 with 16 (5.8%) cases, and coronavirus 229E, with 16 (5.8%) cases. SARS-CoV-2 PCR results were positive in 16 (5.8%) cases, and there were two coinfections of SARS-CoV-2 with adenovirus and rhinovirus/enterovirus. A total of 43 (5.3%) patients were coinfected; the most coinfection was adenovirus plus rhinovirus/enterovirus, which was detectable in 18 (41.9%) cases. No atypical pathogens were found in this study. Intriguingly, our results showed that there was prefect agreement between the detection of SARS-CoV-2 conducted with the cobas Liat SARS-CoV-2 and influenza A/B nucleic acid test and the FilmArrayTM RP. Therefore, the FilmArrayTM RP assay is a reliable and feasible method for the detection of SARS-CoV-2. In summary, FilmArrayTM RP significantly broadens our capability to detect multiple respiratory infections due to viruses and atypical bacteria. It provides a prompt evaluation of pathogens to enhance patient care and clinical selection strategies in emergency departments during the COVID-19 pandemic.

13.
Animals (Basel) ; 12(21)2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089981

ABSTRACT

Swine enteric disease is the predominant cause of morbidity and mortality, and viral species involved in swine enteric disease include rotaviruses and coronaviruses, among others. Awareness of the circulating porcine rotavirus group C (PoRVC) in pig herds is critical to evaluate the potential impact of infection. At present, due to the lack of disease awareness and molecular diagnostic means, the research on RVC infection in China is not well-studied. In this study, diarrhea samples collected from pig farms were detected positive for RVC by PCR, and the full-length RVC was not previously reported for Chinese pig farms. This rotavirus strain was designated as RVC/Pig/CHN/JS02/2018/G6P6. A natural recombination event was observed with breakpoints at nucleotides (nt) 2509 to 2748 of the VP2 gene. Phylogenetic analysis based on nsp1 revealed that a new branch A10 formed. Collectively, our data suggest a potentially novel gene recombination event of RVC in the VP2 gene. These findings provide a new insight into the evolution of the rotavirus.

14.
Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg ; 2022 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087848

ABSTRACT

Visceral l eishmaniasis (VL), also known as kala-azar, had once been targeted for elimination in 2020, which now has been shifted to 2030. The year 2020 was also the year in which the world was gripped by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This review sheds light on the impact of COVID-19 on VL elimination programmes and the increasing incidences of COVID-19/VL cases. Lockdowns were imposed worldwide that led to the suspension of surveys, active case finding and mass drug administration, which are important activities to manage neglected tropical diseases. Healthcare machinery was redirected to control the pandemic and acute resource shortages were seen. Budget cuts from funding agencies and donors also came as a severe blow. Priority changes for manufacturers of drugs and diagnostic kits have also exacerbated the situation. Cases where patients were co-infected with VL and COVID-19 were reported across various settings and in people of various age groups, posing unprecedented challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Concerted efforts from all stakeholders are required to understand and deal with the impact that this pandemic has had on VL.

15.
New Microbes New Infect ; 49: 101041, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2086595

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread globally, becoming a long-lasting pandemic. Dengue is the most common arboviral disease in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. COVID-19 and dengue coinfections have been reported, associated with worse outcomes with significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, this study aims to determine the epidemiological situation of COVID-19 and dengue coinfection in Latin America. Methods: A systematic literature review was performed using PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Web of Science, LILACS, and BVS databases from January 1, 2020, to September 4, 2021. The key search terms used were "dengue" and "COVID-19". Results: Nineteen published articles were included. The studies were case reports with a detailed description of the coinfection's clinical, laboratory, diagnostic, and treatment features. Conclusion: Coinfection with SARS-CoV-2 and dengue virus is associated with worse outcomes with significant morbidity and mortality. The similar clinical and laboratory features of each infection are a challenge in accurately diagnosing and treating cases. Establishing an early diagnosis could be the answer to reducing the estimated significant burden of these conditions.

16.
Model Earth Syst Environ ; 8(4): 5493-5520, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085781

ABSTRACT

A new mathematical model incorporating epidemiological features of the co-dynamics of tuberculosis (TB) and SARS-CoV-2 is analyzed. Local asymptotic stability of the disease-free and endemic equilibria are shown for the sub-models when the respective reproduction numbers are below unity. Bifurcation analysis is carried out for the TB only sub-model, where it was shown that the sub-model undergoes forward bifurcation. The model is fitted to the cumulative confirmed daily SARS-CoV-2 cases for Indonesia from February 11, 2021 to August 26, 2021. The fitting was carried out using the fmincon optimization toolbox in MATLAB. Relevant parameters in the model are estimated from the fitting. The necessary conditions for the existence of optimal control and the optimality system for the co-infection model is established through the application of Pontryagin's Principle. Different control strategies: face-mask usage and SARS-CoV-2 vaccination, TB prevention as well as treatment controls for both diseases are considered. Simulations results show that: (1) the strategy against incident SARS-CoV-2 infection averts about 27,878,840 new TB cases; (2) also, TB prevention and treatment controls could avert 5,397,795 new SARS-CoV-2 cases. (3) In addition, either SARS-CoV-2 or TB only control strategy greatly mitigates a significant number of new co-infection cases.

17.
Antibiotics (Basel) ; 11(10)2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082062

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the period following the declaration of the COVID-19 pandemic, more evidence became available on the epidemiology of bacterial co-/superinfections (bCSs) in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Various European therapeutic guidelines were published, including guidance on rational antibiotic use. METHODS: In this letter to the editor, we provide an overview of the largest meta-analyses or prospective studies reporting on bCS rates in COVID-19 patients and discuss why the reader should interpret the results of those reports with care. Moreover, we compare different national and international COVID-19 therapeutic guidelines from countries of the European Union. Specific attention is paid to guidance dedicated to rational antibiotic use. RESULTS: We found a significant heterogeneity in studies reporting on the epidemiology of bCSs in COVID-19 patients. Moreover, European national and international guidelines differ strongly from each other, especially with regard to the content and extent of antibiotic guidance in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSION: A standardized way of reporting on bCSs and uniform European guidelines on rational antibiotic use in COVID-19 patients are crucial for antimicrobial stewardship teams to halt unnecessary antibiotic use in the COVID-19 setting.

18.
Biomedicines ; 10(10)2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081923

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Few data are available on the impact of bacterial pulmonary co-infection (RespCoBact) during COVID-19 (CovRespCoBact). The aim of this study was to compare the prognosis of patients admitted to an ICU for influenza pneumonia and for SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia with and without RespCoBact. METHODS: This was a multicentre (n = 11) observational study using the Outcomerea© database. Since 2008, all patients admitted with influenza pneumonia or SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia and discharged before 30 June 2021 were included. Risk factors for day-60 death and for ventilator-associated-pneumonia (VAP) in patients with influenza pneumonia or SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia with or without RespCoBact were determined. RESULTS: Of the 1349 patients included, 157 were admitted for influenza and 1192 for SARS-CoV-2. Compared with the influenza patients, those with SARS-CoV-2 had lower severity scores, were more often under high-flow nasal cannula, were less often under invasive mechanical ventilation, and had less RespCoBact (8.2% for SARS-CoV-2 versus 24.8% for influenza). Day-60 death was significantly higher in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia with no increased risk of mortality with RespCoBact. Patients with influenza pneumonia and those with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia had no increased risk of VAP with RespCoBact. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia was associated with an increased risk of mortality compared with Influenza pneumonia. Bacterial pulmonary co-infections on admission were not associated with patient survival rates nor with an increased risk of VAP.

19.
J Fungi (Basel) ; 8(10)2022 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081888

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a great threat to global health. In addition to SARS-CoV-2 itself, clinicians should be alert to the possible occurrence of co-infection or secondary infection among patients with COVID-19. The possible co-pathogens include bacteria, viruses, and fungi, but COVID-19-associated cryptococcosis is rarely reported. This review provided updated and comprehensive information about this rare clinical entity of COVID-19-associated cryptococcosis. Through an updated literature search till 23 August 2022, we identified a total of 18 culture-confirmed case reports with detailed information. Half (n = 9) of them were elderly. Fifteen (83.3%) of them had severe COVID-19 and ever received systemic corticosteroid. Disseminated infection with cryptococcemia was the most common type of cryptococcosis, followed by pulmonary and meningitis. Except one case of C. laurentii, all other cases are by C. neoformans. Liposomal amphotericin B and fluconazole were the most commonly used antifungal agents. The overall mortality was 61.1% (11/18) and four of them did not receive antifungal agents before death. Improving the poor outcome requires a physician's high suspicion, early diagnosis, and prompt treatment.

20.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 12: 971933, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2083090

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, there have been an increasing number of COVID-19 patients with cavitary or cystic lung lesions, re-positive or long-term positive nucleic acid tests, but the mechanism is still unclear. Lung cavities may appear at long time interval from initial onset of coronavirus infection, generally during the absorption phase of the disease. The main histopathological characteristic is diffuse alveolar damage and may have more severe symptoms after initial recovery from COVID-19 and an increased mortality rate. There are many possible etiologies of pulmonary cavities in COVID-19 patients and we hypothesize that occult SARS-CoV-2, in the form of biofilm, is harbored in the airway lacuna with other pathogenic microorganisms, which may be the cause of pulmonary cavities and repeated and long-term positive nucleic acid tests.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nucleic Acids , Tuberculosis, Pleural , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary , Biofilms , Humans , Lung/pathology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/pathology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL