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1.
BMC Med Ethics ; 23(1): 45, 2022 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1798405

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Commentators believe that the ethical decision-making climate is instrumental in enhancing interprofessional collaboration in intensive care units (ICUs). Our aim was twofold: (1) to determine the perception of the ethical climate, levels of moral distress, and intention to leave one's job among nurses and physicians, and between the different ICU types and (2) determine the association between the ethical climate, moral distress, and intention to leave. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional questionnaire study between May 2021 and August 2021 involving 206 nurses and physicians in a large urban academic hospital. We used the validated Ethical Decision-Making Climate Questionnaire (EDMCQ) and the Measure of Moral Distress for Healthcare Professionals (MMD-HP) tools and asked respondents their intention to leave their jobs. We also made comparisons between the different ICU types. We used Pearson's correlation coefficient to identify statistically significant associations between the Ethical Climate, Moral Distress, and Intention to Leave. RESULTS: Nurses perceived the ethical climate for decision-making as less favorable than physicians (p < 0.05). They also had significantly greater levels of moral distress and higher intention to leave their job rates than physicians. Regarding the ICU types, the Neonatal/Pediatric unit had a significantly higher overall ethical climate score than the Medical and Surgical units (3.54 ± 0.66 vs. 3.43 ± 0.81 vs. 3.30 ± 0.69; respectively; both p ≤ 0.05) and also demonstrated lower moral distress scores (both p < 0.05) and lower "intention to leave" scores compared with both the Medical and Surgical units. The ethical climate and moral distress scores were negatively correlated (r = -0.58, p < 0.001); moral distress and "intention to leave" was positively correlated (r = 0.52, p < 0.001); and ethical climate and "intention to leave" were negatively correlated (r = -0.50, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Significant differences exist in the perception of the ethical climate, levels of moral distress, and intention to leave between nurses and physicians and between the different ICU types. Inspecting the individual factors of the ethical climate and moral distress tools can help hospital leadership target organizational factors that improve interprofessional collaboration, lessening moral distress, decreasing turnover, and improved patient care.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Intention , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units , Job Satisfaction , Morals , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
One Health Outlook ; 4(1): 8, 2022 Apr 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1798361

ABSTRACT

The risk of spreading emerging and reemerging diseases has been increasing by the interactions of human - animal - ecosystems and increases account for more than one billion cases, a million deaths and caused hundreds of billions of US dollars of economic damage per year in the world. Countries in which their household income is dependent on livestock are characterized by a strong correlation between a high burden of zoonotic disease and poverty. The One Health approach is critical for solutions to prevent, prepare for, and respond to these complex threats. As part of the implementation of the Global Health Security Agenda, Ethiopia has embraced the One Health approach to respond to the existing and emerging threats. Several developments have been made to pioneer One Health schemes in Ethiopia which includes establishment of the National One Health Steering Committee and Technical Working Groups, prioritization of zoonotic diseases based on their impact on human and livestock, the development of prevention and control working documents for prioritized zoonotic diseases, joint disease surveillance and outbreak investigation, prioritization of zoonotic diseases, capacity building and other One Health promotions. Nevertheless, there are still so many challenges which need to be addressed. Poor integration among sectors in data sharing and communication, institutionalization of One Health, lack of continuous advocacy among the community, lack of financial funds from the government, limited research fund and activities on One Health, etc. are among many challenges. Hence, it is critical to continue raising awareness of One Health approach and foster leaders to work across disciplines and sectors. Therefore, continuous review on available global and national one health information and achievements to provide compiled information for more understanding is very important.

3.
International Journal of Ethics and Systems ; JOUR
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2097559

ABSTRACT

Purpose - This study aims to examine how muzakki (zakat donator) and mustahik (zakat recipients) collaborated to strengthen the fundraising capability in Islamic social finance institutions (ISFIs) during the COVID-19. Design/methodology/approach - This study uses a descriptive qualitative method in conjunction with interview techniques. Interviews with muzakki of various professions were conducted, as well as data from field documentation, to develop a collaborative model of muzakki and mustahik in strengthening the fundraising capacity of ISFIs. Findings - The findings indicate that muzakki employed as civil servants, BUMN (state-owned enterprises) employees and entrepreneurs continue to pay zakat through ISFIs and support mustahik, whereas muzakki affected by the COVID-19 pandemic reduce their zakat spending. Consequently, with the collaboration of mustahik and muzakki, a framework can be developed to strengthen the strategy for raising funds for ISFIs. By empowering mustahik with businesses, ISFIs can increase the collection of zakat funds. Research limitations/implications - The collaboration model would strengthen ISFI's ability to raise Islamic philanthropic funds and optimize their management. The basis for the regulation is contained in Law No. 23 of 2011 which allows collaboration between institutions and other stakeholders. In addition, the role of ISFIs does not end with the collection and distribution of funds, they also maintain the muzakki and mustahik's cooperation, so a significant role is required in involving muzakki and mustahik for them to collaborate and synergize, as well as improving the quality of human resource from Amil (zakat collector) to implement the strategy. Originality/value - Few studies have been conducted in collaboration with Muzakki and Mustahik to develop models or frameworks for strengthening fundraising capabilities in ISFIs. Most of these studies are illustrative. Through collaboration between Muzakki and Mustahik, this research establishes a new model for enhancing the strategy of Islamic social finance fund raising to establish a sustainable system for ISFIs.

4.
Teach Learn Nurs ; 2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096060

ABSTRACT

Background: As part of program evaluation, the New Mexico Nursing Education Consortium, a consortium of eleven state-funded nursing schools, asks that students complete end-of-term surveys. In Spring 2020, a question was added to the survey to elicit challenges experienced by students during the COVID-19 pandemic: "What was the biggest challenge that you had in completing the semester/term?" This question again was asked of students in Spring 2021. Objectives: To determine challenges faced by nursing students in 2020 and 2021 due to the pandemic. Design: Qualitative. Settings: Eleven state-funded nursing schools belonging to the New Mexico Nursing Education Consortium. Participants: Students enrolled in member nursing programs. Methods: Braun and Clarke's 2006 thematic analysis. Results: Eight themes were identified for each of the two years. Conclusions: Nursing faculty must anticipate and respond to student feedback while maintaining proficiency in face-to-face and online teaching-learning strategies. Waiting until emergencies arise that require different types of pedagogy is not sufficient to ensure instructor proficiency with online pedagogies.

5.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 30(5): 713-718, 2022 Sep.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2091635

ABSTRACT

The article develops a research agenda for cross-sectoral collaboration on the issues of public health. The aspects of this collaboration are not scientifically founded during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of the research is to study the inventory of the sectors involved in public health in the Russian Federation during the COVID-19 pandemic and to put in perspective their importance. An anonymous survey of 49 experts - health service managers was made. The respondents were asked to identify the inventory of the sectors involved in public health and to voice their opinion on their importance during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results of the survey were compared to the results obtained before the pandemic. The results of the study suggest that 23 sectors should always be involved in public health both during the COVID-19 pandemic and without it. The sectors are of relatively equal importance. However, the sectors of the inventory are ranked differently in the order of importance during the pandemic and without it. A statistically significant difference in the analysed characteristic feature is noted. The article develops a research agenda for further studies and provide implications for health-service managers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Public Health , Surveys and Questionnaires , Russia/epidemiology
6.
12th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Participative Computing for Sustainable Futures, NordiCHI 2022 ; JOUR
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2088927

ABSTRACT

People with religious and/or spiritual interests have long been digitally connected and have engaged in joint prayer, worship, or meditation. However, the COVID pandemic has accelerated this trend as more religious and/or spiritual activities were technologically mediated. Many of these formats had to be implemented quickly, often with little participation from stakeholders. In this workshop, we aim to bring together scholars and practitioners from different backgrounds, such as religious studies, theology, HCI, and participatory design, to start a conversation about what collaborative technological design and research with religious and/or spiritual communities could look like in the future and what needs to be done to get to such futures. The outcomes of this workshop will be the formation of a transdisciplinary research and design community, the establishment of guiding principles and best practices that can inform research and design methodologies, and the dissemination of this knowledge in collaborative post-workshop publications. © 2022 Owner/Author.

7.
TSG ; 98(3): 122-125, 2020.
Article in Dutch | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085587

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic presents healthcare organizations with substantial challenges. Four main themes can be distinguished in the way healthcare organizations organize the necessary preconditions for their professionals to provide high quality care in this crisis. These include: keeping professionals employable, implementing a wide range of digital solutions, collaborating with organizations in and outside of healthcare at a large scale and rapid pace, and interacting with national and regional policy, which can either serve as a barrier or facilitator. It is essential to learn from these approaches and rapidly disseminate the associated best practices.

8.
Apuntes-Revista De Ciencias Sociales ; JOUR(92):125-149, 49.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2083007

ABSTRACT

Collaborative relationships in Education have been impacted by the advancement of the COVID-19 pandemic in various latitudes of the world, making it important to explore its impact in Latin American contexts This study analyzes the impact of the pandemic on collaboration patterns of three schools in Chile. The analysis has an exploratory descriptive approach, following a Social Network Analysis (SNA) methodology, which allows the quantification of changes in collaborative relationships between the 77 schools members being analyzed. The results show that collaboration patterns changed during the pandemic, highlighting a wider distribution among educational actors' positions and roles, and showing that the socio-sanitary emergency had an impact on their collaborative relationships.

9.
Vaccine ; 40(47): 6689-6699, 2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2083239

ABSTRACT

At a workshop on 22-24 March 2022, leaders of 33 advanced vaccinology courses were invited to meet with partners to further the aims of the International Collaboration on Advanced Vaccinology Training (ICAVT) initiated in 2018 to assist courses in addressing challenges in priority areas and facilitate interactions and exchange of information. This included: an update to the landscape analysis of advanced vaccinology courses conducted in 2018, sharing experiences and good practices in the implementation of virtual training, reviewing the training needs of target audiences, informing courses of the principles, challenges, and added value of accreditation, discussing course evaluations and measurement of course impact, reviewing principles and support needed for quality cascade training, reviewing COVID-19 impact on training and identifying remaining related training needs, and identifying solutions to facilitate refresher courses and ways to facilitate networking of courses' alumni (particularly for virtual courses). The aims were to identify needs and impediments and implement necessary actions to facilitate sharing of information and resources between courses, to identify need for further developments of the e-Portal of the Collaboration (icavt.org) established to facilitate communication between the different courses and assist future course participants identify the most suitable course for them, and to discuss the formalization of the Collaboration. During the workshop, participants looked at several reports of surveys completed by courses and courses' alumni or partners. The COVID-19 pandemic impacted the delivery of some vaccinology courses leading to postponement, delivery online or hybrid training events. Lack of sustainable funding remained a major constraint for advanced vaccinology training and needs to be addressed. The Collaboration was consolidated with responsibilities and benefits for the members better defined. There was strong support for the Collaboration to continue with the organization of educational sessions at future workshops. The meeting re-enforced the view that there was much enthusiasm and commitment for the Global Collaboration and its core values.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccinology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/prevention & control , Organizations
10.
Pediatr Clin North Am ; 69(5): 895-904, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082769

ABSTRACT

Providing high-quality clinical services to patients with neurodevelopmental disabilities (NDDs) requires interprofessional collaboration. This article highlights the importance of collaboration between psychology and developmental-behavioral pediatrics (DBP) to promote diagnosis, treatment recommendations, and integrated care for patients and their families. Interprofessional collaboration requires health care providers to work together toward solutions, including diagnosis, treatment recommendations, and ongoing care coordination. Case examples are presented to capture collaborative practice between psychology and DBP. Several established programs for providing interprofessional collaboration are highlighted, with noted benefits and barriers to collaborative care for NDD patients.


Subject(s)
Interprofessional Relations , Pediatrics , Child , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Humans
15.
Text (Australia) ; 26(1), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2081624

ABSTRACT

Since 2014, the Writers Immersion and Cultural Exchange (WrICE) program has sought to invite genuine trans-cultural encounters and dialogue among peer creative writers from different nations, cultural backgrounds, interests and life experiences across Asia and Australia. These have been enacted through in-person collaborative residencies, designed and staged based on a set of five compositional principles. In 2020, these principles were challenged, tested and elaborated in new ways through a new WrICE residency conducted entirely online: a move made necessary by the COVID-19 pandemic and its conditions of physical separation. Our findings from this digital residency experience offer insights into future directions for approaching transnational collaboration and dialogue among writers, artists, scholars, activists and others in a more constrained world, during and after the pandemic. Biographical note: Sreedhevi Iyer is a Lecturer in Creative Writing at RMIT University. She is the author of two books, Jungle Without Water (2017) and The Tiniest House of Time (2020). Her forthcoming monograph focuses on how authors perform authenticity across multiple communicative contexts. Her creative works have been published in several countries. Alvin Pang is Adjunct Professor at RMIT University. A poet, writer, editor, scholar and translator, his creative practice spans over two decades of literary activity in Singapore and elsewhere. With his writing translated into more than twenty languages worldwide, his latest titles include What Happened: Poems 1997-2017 (Math Paper Press, 2017) and Uninterrupted Time (Recent Work Press, 2019). David Carlin is Professor of Creative Writing and co-founder of both WrICE and the non/fictionLab at RMIT University. His work includes four books of essayist nonfiction, including The After-Normal: Brief, Alphabetical Essays on a Changing Planet (2019, with Nicole Walker), 100 Atmospheres: Studies in Scale and Wonder (2019, with MECO Network), and three co-edited anthologies. David is Co-President of NonfictioNOW. © 2022, Australasian Association of Writing Programs. All rights reserved.

16.
Journal of Education for Library & Information Science ; 63(4):372-388, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2080060

ABSTRACT

After spreading quickly around the world and causing the declaration of a pandemic by the World Health Organization on March 11, 2020, COVID-19 has also forced educational institutions into lockdown around the world. They had to continue their activities through distance learning and online courses to cope with this pandemic outbreak. One of the areas of higher education that was most affected by this unexpected situation was internship programs, and alternative ways began to be sought instead of face-to-face internships. The aim of this study is to introduce the first online internship program developed in lieu of an in-person internship program as a response to nationwide lockdowns due to the pandemic. The program was conducted between June 29 and July 24, 2020, via the Zoom platform and designed in five modules, with the detailed content information provided under each module. A total of 21 sessions were held, and 32 library and archive specialists contributed to the program. The study also provides information on the results of a survey applied to 61 students at the end of the program. The analysis of the survey results demonstrates that the majority of the interns who participated in the program preferred to have a face-to-face internship. But also, they explained that this program was a valuable contribution to their theoretical learning as it was run by professionals from different information organizations. Also, the sustainability of the program is reviewed by taking into account its advantages and disadvantages. Overall, this study provides an international perspective on an alternative model of internship programs which supports theoretical education in the library and information science field. [ FROM AUTHOR]

17.
European Journal of Innovation Management ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2078049

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Academics and practitioners are increasingly discussing the role of crowdsourcing initiatives in dealing with the challenges imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, along with their role in an emergency context in general. However, empirical evidence about the role of crowdsourcing initiatives in an emergency context is still scarce. This paper aims to address this gap in knowledge. Design/methodology/approach: The authors adopted an inductive approach to investigate how companies leveraged crowdsourcing initiatives to address the issues posed by COVID-19. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews. The selection of the interviewees was based on a purposive sampling strategy. Data were analysed through thematic analysis. Findings: The analysis led to the identification and examination of drivers (e.g. preserving relationships with customers), advantages (e.g. increased demand for services) and disadvantages (e.g. increased platform cost) of implementing crowdsourcing initiatives during COVID-19. By leveraging the findings, this paper suggests future research opportunities. Relevant future research opportunities include: (1) quantitatively evaluating the economic impact of crowdsourcing initiatives during a disruptive event and (2) examining how the sector in which the company operates influences the beneficial and detrimental effects of crowdsourcing initiatives on company performance. Originality/value: The involvement of crowds as innovation partners has provided unique opportunities for companies to innovate and address the challenging scenario. The scientific literature about the role of crowdsourcing during COVID-19 is growing. However, there is still a scarcity of empirical evidence about the mechanisms underpinning the use of crowdsourcing during the pandemic. By leveraging semi-structured interviews, this paper addresses this relevant gap in knowledge. © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited.

18.
Prof Sch Couns ; 26(1): 2156759X221134661, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079161

ABSTRACT

Collaborative efforts by school counselors and school administrators that are grounded in social capital principles have the potential to better support students' educational success, health, and well-being in the wake of challenging and adverse events, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of this study was to assess perceptions of school counselors and administrators to determine the extent to which they had a shared vision of the challenges and strengths in their school's initial response to the pandemic. We also explored their sense of the anticipated future needs within the context of social capital theory and trauma-informed practices. Participants included 381 current pre-K-12 school administrators and school counselors throughout the United States who completed a mixed-methods survey in spring 2020. Use of these findings can help school stakeholders continue to foster students' social/emotional, academic, and career and college readiness development during continued and future mass trauma events.

19.
J Sch Health ; 2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2078586

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic intensified disparities for underserved populations as accessing resources became more difficult. Dairy Council of California launched the Let's Eat Healthy initiative to address nutrition security through collaborative solutions in the school environment. IMPLICATIONS FOR SCHOOL HEALTH POLICY, PRACTICE, AND EQUITY: To ensure nutrition security for children and families, nutritious food and nutrition education must go hand-in-hand. Improving access to high quality food can help address the health disparities that exist for people who are at increased risk for food insecurity. Nutrition education supports students' holistic learning and social and emotional learning skills. Nutrition education models must be increasingly flexible in the face of ongoing challenges. Collaborative efforts to connect food access hubs, such as schools, with support and resources to provide evidence-based nutrition education and agricultural literacy can equip individuals and communities with the knowledge, skills, and ability to make nutrient-rich food choices. CONCLUSIONS: Investments and strategies in nutrition security that utilize the Individual plus Policy, System, and Environmental (I + PSE) model, such as the Let's Eat Healthy initiative, will effectively influence positive behavior change and improve community health. Navigating challenges in a rapidly changing environment requires people and organizations to work together, across disciplines, to leverage knowledge, experience, resources, expertise, and creative thinking. Improving access to healthy food and nutrition education will be most effective when done through collaboration.

20.
Studies in Systems, Decision and Control ; 216:803-813, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2075253

ABSTRACT

Disruptive Technologies have created radical transformations in different industry fields. They also changed principles governing market and competitions. This role was considered an advantage in different organizational aspects including performance, effectiveness and competitiveness. The attendance of these technologies was not bounded by these aspects alone, it has also flourished in crises and specifically Covid-19 pandemic. One of these disruptive technologies that caught interest in this crisis is cloud collaboration platforms (CCPs). CCPs were essential and critical in a key sector during the pandemic, which was education. The pandemic outbreak caused a mandatory conversion towards online education leaded by CCPs. Demonstration of these platforms during the pandemic was accompanied with their evaluation using different criteria. Still, these criteria were neither clearly justified in their reasons of use nor classified according to their importance during the pandemic. In this paper, a model of CCPs evaluation criteria during the pandemic is presented. This model is based on previous research criteria and applies inductive approach through discovering users experience regarding these criteria during the pandemic. Functionality, reliability and usability in addition to their sub-standards were the main criteria that have been assessed and ranked by users. The users who rated the criteria were academics and experts of a university in Jordan and they were engaged in online education using CCPs. Evaluation was conducted using a quantitative approach using an online questionnaire which was distributed to these academics. Findings show that security and understandability are the most significant criteria that we should look after during the pandemic. Fault tolerance, accuracy, suitability and maturity standards have the second priority and finally, compliance, recoverability, learnability and interoperability have the third priority. © 2023, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

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