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1.
Psychiatry Research Communications ; JOUR: 100082,
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2105771

ABSTRACT

This systematic review aims to take China as an example to determine the prevalence of mental health problems and associated influential factors of college students in different stages of the COVID-19 pandemic and provide a reference for effective intervention in the future. A systematic search was conducted on PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, and Google scholar. A total of 30 articles were included. 1,477,923 Chinese college students were surveyed. In the early stage, the prevalence rates of depression, anxiety, stress, and PTSD ranged from 9.0% to 65.2%, 6.88%–41.1%, 8.53%–67.05%, and 2.7%–30.8%, respectively. Major risk factors were being a female, a medical student, isolation or quarantine, having family members or friends infected with COVID-19, and challenges of online learning. During the normalization stage, depression, anxiety, and insomnia prevalence rates ranged from 8.7% to 50.2%, 4.2%–34.6%, and 6.1%–35.0%, respectively. The main risk factors were self-quarantined after school reopening, regular taking temperature, and wearing face masks. The prevalence rates of mental health problems and associated influential factors unveiled in both stages showed that the students' mental health status was greatly affected. Therefore, a combination of efforts from the government, universities, and families or communities is highly needed to alleviate the mental health sufferings of students.

2.
Journal of Adolescent Health ; JOUR
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2095549

ABSTRACT

Purpose To assess the sociodemographic and behavioral risk factors associated with driving after marijuana use among US college students. Methods A secondary analysis used the Fall 2020 and Spring 2021 American College Health Association- National College Health Assessment III and the dataset was restricted to college students ≥ 18 years of age who reported recent driving and marijuana use. Associations between risk factors and driving after marijuana use were estimated using multivariable logistic regression. Results A total of 29.9% (n=4,947) of the respondents reported driving after marijuana use. Males (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.64, 95% confidence interval [CI]:1.48-1.82), non-Hispanic Black (AOR: 1.32, 95% CI:1.02-1.71), sexual minorities (AOR:1.19, 95% CI: 1.07-1.31), individuals with an alcohol or substance use disorder (AOR: 1.44, 95% CI:1.08-1.91), anxiety (AOR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.06-1.36), higher suicidality (AOR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.07-1.31), and those who also drank and drove (AOR: 3.18, 95% CI: 2.84-3.57) had a higher risk of driving after marijuana use. Conclusions Future research should focus on increasing awareness of driving after marijuana use and prevention programs and/or strategies on college campuses regarding driving after marijuana use for these groups to reduce this risky behavior.

3.
J Am Coll Health ; : 1-9, 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097041

ABSTRACT

Objective: We examined students' perceptions and opinions regarding others' COVID-19 mitigation behaviors and how these behaviors impacted feelings of safety and desire for on-campus engagement. Participants: Undergraduate and graduate students enrolled at a midsize regional state university during the Spring 2021 semester (n = 893). Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was utilized with an online and anonymous questionnaire. Scale means were calculated followed by ANOVAs to determine significance. Results: Two independent variables impacted students' feelings of safety for on-ground courses and activities: living situation (on campus, with roommates) and school year (freshman/sophomores). Underclassmen were more likely to desire in-person campus engagement. Conclusions: Students showed a willingness to return to campus, but also concern over peer behaviors and remaining safe. Returning to a pre-pandemic social environment is critical for students' mental health, and making students feel safe on campus is an important first step to return campuses to vibrant educational and social communities.

4.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; JOUR(12-B):No Pagination Specified, 83.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2084105

ABSTRACT

Human capital theory suggests that lifetime income and socioeconomic status is a function of investments in human capital (Becker, 1962 & 1994;Becker & Tomes, 1986;Tomes, 1981). More recent developments show that human capital accumulation depends on mental health (Fletcher, 2008), in addition to ability, and access to resources to finance education and training (Becker, 1962 & 1994;Becker and Chiswick, 1966;Becker & Tomes, 1986;Tomes, 1981;Rosen, 1977). The COVID-19 pandemic is likely to impact human capital accumulation decisions as research has shown the pandemic impacted the mental health of college students, with women (Alon et al., 2020;Browning et al., 2021;Hoyt et al., 2020;Kecojevic et al., 2020) and sexual minorities (Hoyt et al., 2020;Lederer et al., 2020;Sanchez-Teruel et al., 2021) experiencing the worst well-being. In addition, research indicated differences in mental health among college students during the pandemic across race and ethnicity (Browing et al., 2021;Hoyt et al., 2020;Lederer et al., 2020). In this study, I investigated the impact of mental health of college students during the COVID-19 pandemic on a human capital accumulation decision, the likelihood of enrollment in Spring 2022 for college students enrolled in Fall 2021. I surveyed students to measure four dimensions of mental health at three higher education institutions in Massachusetts. The analysis provided a better understanding of the impact of mental health among college students on retention and persistence, and how they vary by demographic, academic, and socioeconomic characteristics. In addition, I investigated whether resilience and learning disabilities mediate and or moderate the impact of mental health on likelihood of reenrollment among college students. More than a third of students in the sample rated their mental health worse than before the pandemic. Controlling for mental health, demographic, academic, and socioeconomic characteristics, estimates for retention were not statistically significantly different at the three institutions that participated in this study. Furthermore, while loneliness and resilience scores did not play a role in the decision to enroll in Spring 2022, the results suggest that the higher the probability of an underlying anxiety or depressive disorder, the lower the probability of reenrollment for the cohort that participated in the study. Furthermore, this effect was larger and statistically significantly different for those who graduated from high school or earned a GED during the pandemic compared to those that did not. The understanding gained from this study may be used to improve the educational experience of students at colleges and universities during the COVID-19 pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

5.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; JOUR(12-B):No Pagination Specified, 83.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2083802

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to measure the correlation between knowledge of viral disease and disease risk perception, disease severity perception, and mask wearing during the COVID-19 pandemic by level of education, age, and gender at a community college in Phoenix, Arizona. Participants were recruited by an email sent to all students, faculty, and staff at PVCC using an all-college email distribution list. Disease risk and severity perception were assessed with the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire 5, which was modified to include questions measuring participant age, education level, and whether they had ever taken a college biology course. Two additional question sets measured compliance of willingness to wear a face mask. Analysis showed a significant relationship between gender and mask wearing behavior and between knowledge of viral disease in combination with education level and the combined variables of disease risk perception, disease severity perception, and mask wearing behavior. No significant difference from having taken a biology course was found in risk perception, disease severity perception, and mask wearing behavior by age. The results suggest that formal higher education that includes a knowledge of viral disease influences how individuals perceive the severity and risk of COVID-19 and modify their mask wearing behavior accordingly. Gender influences people's willingness to wear a mask, even though it has no effect of risk perception or severity perception. The results can be used to modify existing health education strategies. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

6.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; JOUR(12-B):No Pagination Specified, 83.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2083737

ABSTRACT

Background: Depression is a prevalent and leading issue among college students, which became worsened by the global pandemic of COVID-19. The Student Health Clinic in one of the tertiary public universities in Southern California also proved to be impacted with mental health complaints, depression being one of the most common diagnoses. The early treatment of depression is critical to avoid possible complications including suicidal ideation from untreated depression. Objectives: The primary objective was to implement a new workflow (Fast-Track) to treat students with uncomplicated depression as early as possible. Method: This project used a pre- and post-intervention design. The Fast-Track has three components: 1) reserving appointment slots from primary care providers' clinic schedules for the Fast-Track patients, 2) sending an education material about depression treatment options to the patients to read before an initial visit, 3) providing two follow-up visits at weeks 2, and 5 or 6. A descriptive analysis was performed for demographic data and secondary outcome (PHQ-9 score), Paired two sample t-Test was used for the primary outcome (time to treatment in days). Data from the participants who completed the two follow-up visits were included in the analysis. Results: A total of 24 patients met the criteria for uncomplicated depression. 16 patients completed the two follow-up visits. Time to treatment in days reduced from 19.2 days (SD 4.6) to 2.5 days (SD 1.8) (p < 0.05). The mean PHQ-9 score at the baseline visit was 13.6 (SD 4.1) and 11.4 (SD 2.5) at the second follow-up visit with a mean change of -2. 2. 81.3% (n=13) of the 16 patients reported improvement at week 5 or 6 and 18.6 % (n=3) reported worsening of their depression symptoms. Conclusion: Opening up access to provider schedules greatly improved the patient's time to treatment. Utilizing primary care providers, including APRN's, in the management of simple, uncomplicated depression for college students was safe and successful. The outcomes seen in this project offer some insight into how the pharmacological treatment for simple, uncomplicated depression can be safely initiated sooner among college students. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

7.
Heliyon ; 8(11): e11205, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082718

ABSTRACT

In a developing country like the Philippines, it is critical to understand the important factors which lead college students to their current colleges and universities, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study utilized the conjoint analysis approach with an orthogonal design for evaluating understudy's inclination in choosing a college with the various attributes such as the tuition fee, distance or location, employability, academic reputation, recommended by friends and peers, recommended by family or relatives, and the availability to transfer was assessed. A total of 518 Filipino students studying at public and state universities participated in answering the 16 combined attributions about university preference using purposive sampling approach. Based on the utilities estimate, the most important attribute was the tuition fee of the preferred university with an importance value of about 32.839%, followed by the employability rate of the university with about 6% gap difference. The mid-concerned attributes were the distance/location with an estimated of 11.139%, recommendation of friends or peers with approximately 11.689% tying together, and the academic reputation with an estimated of 10.638%. The two least important attributes were identified to be the availability to transfer, having with only about 2.713%, and the recommendation of parents with only 2% difference at approximately 4.453%. The outcomes of this study can aid college chairmen and enrolment specialists tweak their advertising procedures by giving significant data to the chief gatherings engaged with settling college decision choices.

8.
J Am Coll Health ; : 1-4, 2022 Oct 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082231

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine the associations between coping methods and college adjustment among a sample of U.S. undergraduate students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants: We used a sample of 117 undergraduate students between the age of 18-25 years old. Approximately 76% of the sample identified as women and 58% identified as White. Methods: Participants completed online questionnaires that assessed the use of forward-focused coping, trauma-focused coping, and several domains of college adjustment (i.e., academic adjustment, social adjustment, personal-emotional adjustment, and attachment). We used multiple regression to identify the association between coping methods and college adjustment, using race and gender as control variables. Results: Forward-focused coping methods were significantly and positively related to academic adjustment, social adjustment, and attachment, while and trauma-focused coping methods were significantly and negatively related to personal-emotional adjustment. Conclusions: The use of forward-focused coping methods may be beneficial for undergraduate students during the COVID-19 pandemic.

9.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 994376, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080278

ABSTRACT

Object: We aimed to investigate the associations between perceived social support and anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance via self-control among Chinese college students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and methods: The Perceived Social Support Scale, Self-control Scale, Self-rating Anxiety Scale, Self-rating Depression Scale, and Insomnia Severity Index Scale were used to survey 1,997 college students during the COVID-19 pandemic, who submitted valid questionnaires (M age = 19.93, SD age = 1.47, Range = 18-24 years, 62% female). Results: The perceived social support and self-control were significantly positively correlated, and they were significantly and negatively associated with anxiety, depression, and insomnia. Further analysis found that self-control partially mediated the relationships between perceived social support with anxiety, depression, and insomnia. Conclusion: During the COVID-19 pandemic, Chinese college students' self-control played a partial mediating effect in the relationships between perceived social support and anxiety, depression, and insomnia. This study provides new insights and inspiration for improving college students' mental health in the context of the pandemic.

10.
Front Psychol ; 13: 1000109, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080260

ABSTRACT

Background: During the COVID-19 pandemic, suspensions of activities and long periods of self-isolation led to a sharp increase in excessive use of mobile phones, which sparked public concern about mobile phone addiction (MPA). In recent years, more and more attention has been paid to physical exercise as a protective effect of MPA. However, more studies are needed to reveal this relationship and the exact mechanisms, based on which this study tested the mediating and moderating roles of self-control, rumination, psychological distress, and loneliness between physical exercise and MPA. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, primary data was collected by questionnaire from 1,843 college students (19.75 ± 1.3) from five universities in Sichuan Province in Mainland China. Mobile Phone Addiction Tendency Scale (MPATS), Physical Activity Rating Scale-3 (PARS-3), Self-Control Scale (SCS), Ruminative Response Scale (RRS), Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21), and UCLA Loneliness Scale (UCLA-20) were investigated. The mediating models were examined using SPSS PROCESS macro 3.3 software, in which the mediation variables were self-control, rumination, and psychological distress, and the moderation was loneliness. Gender, major, and grade were included as control variables. Result: Self-control, rumination, and psychological distress played a simple mediating role between physical exercise and MPA. Moreover, not only self-control and rumination but also self-control and psychological distress played the chain mediating roles between physical exercise and MPA. The chain pathways were moderated by loneliness. Specifically, the effect was more substantial among college students with higher loneliness. Conclusion: The conclusions corroborate and clarify that self-control, rumination, and psychological distress mediated the association between physical exercise and MPA, and the mediation effects were moderated via loneliness. This present study advanced our understanding of how and when college students' physical exercise was related to MPA. It also illustrates that educators and parents should pay more attention to college students' physical exercise.

11.
Heliyon ; 8(11): e11085, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2076134

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between depression, emotional exhaustion, self-esteem, satisfaction with studies, academic self-efficacy, and the use of virtual media in Peruvian university students during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A total of 569 college students (61.9% female), with a mean age of 21.73 years (standard deviation = 4.95), responded to the following questionnaires: Academic Self-Efficacy Scale, Single Item Self-Esteem Scale, Brief Scale of Satisfaction with Studies, Scale of Use of Virtual Media, Patient Health Questionnarie-2, and Single Item of Academic Emotional Exhaustion. Correlation statistics, regression models, and structural equation modeling (SEM) were used for data analysis. The results demonstrated a direct and significant correlation between virtual media use, academic self-efficacy, self-esteem, depression, and emotional exhaustion (p < .01). In addition, satisfaction with studies (ß = -0.13), academic self-efficacy (ß = -0.19), self-esteem (ß = -0.14), and emotional exhaustion (ß = 0.19) predicted depression significantly, whereas virtual media use (ß = 0.17), study satisfaction (ß = 0.09), and depression (ß = 0.20) predicted emotional exhaustion associated with academics. The SEM model indicated that self-esteem, satisfaction with studies, and academic self-efficacy negatively predict depression, whereas academic self-efficacy positively predicts virtual media use. Finally, both virtual media use and depression positively predict emotional exhaustion. This model presents optimal goodness-of-fit indices (X2 = 8.926, df = 6, p = .178; comparative fit = .991, Tucker-Lewis = .979, root mean square error of approximation = .029 [confidence interval 90% = .000-.067], standardized root mean square residual = .022). Thus, academic self-efficacy, self-esteem, satisfaction with studies, and virtual media use predict depression and emotional exhaustion among college students during the COVID-19 pandemic.

12.
American Journal of Sexuality Education ; : 1-19, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070025

ABSTRACT

Few studies explore the components of sexual satisfaction as specified by college students. This cross-sectional study examined sexual satisfaction at the event level for undergraduate students (n = 1,090), focusing on differences between males/females. Survey results revealed for both males and females, being comfortable with a partner, experiencing orgasm, and having a partner "with skills" predicted sexual satisfaction. Satisfied males reported feeling safe with their partners, spent time touching/kissing, and had "romantic" partners. Satisfied females had partners with previous sexual experience, whom they desired, and vice-versa. These findings can inform comprehensive sexuality education efforts to incorporate the teaching of satisfaction into sexual health.

13.
Journal of Poverty ; : 1-19, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070002

ABSTRACT

The pandemic exposed economic vulnerabilities in society. As businesses and college campuses shut down, lines at food pantries and other community food giveaways stretched for miles. College students had to figure out how to obtain food and negotiate other financial obligations. This study examines the food security of college students before and after the initial months of the pandemic, and how strengthening the social safety net stabilized food security. Our recommendations illustrate that the strengthened safety net has a food justice orientation and could be made permanent if there was the political and moral will to do so.

14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071471

ABSTRACT

This study focused on COVID-19 perceived risk and Internet addiction among Chinese college students during the lockdown. On the basis of the Social Cognitive Theory, this study proposed a mediating model to evaluate the mediating role of difficulties in regulating emotion between the COVID-19 perceived risk and Internet addiction. A questionnaire survey was conducted among 690 college students during the COVID-19 lockdown in China. The results showed that the COVID-19 perceived risk was significantly positively associated with Internet addiction (r = 0.236, p < 0.001) and difficulties in emotion regulation (r = 0.220, p < 0.001), difficulties in emotion regulation was significantly positively associated with Internet addiction (r = 0.368, p < 0.001). The COVID-19 perceived risk had a significant and positive predictive effect on Internet addiction (ß = 0.233, p < 0.001) among Chinese college students. The analysis of the mediation model showed that difficulties in emotion regulation partially mediated the relationship between COVID-19 perceived risk and Internet addiction (indirect effect value was 0.051 with 95% Confidence Interval ranging from 0.027 to 0.085). The findings not only enhanced our understanding of the internal influence mechanism of COVID-19 perceived risk on Internet addiction but also provided a practical basis for college education works. Finally, discussions and suggestions were provided on the basis of the results.


Subject(s)
Behavior, Addictive , COVID-19 , Humans , Internet Addiction Disorder , Behavior, Addictive/epidemiology , Behavior, Addictive/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Students/psychology , China/epidemiology , Internet
15.
Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability ; 35(2):99-111, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2068406

ABSTRACT

Postsecondary institutions across the United States shifted to remote learning during the spring 2020 semester due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This study qualitatively explores responses to a subset of five open-ended questions that were part of a larger national survey of college students with disabilities (Madaus et al., 2021). Student perceptions of institutional and disability service offices' response to remote learning are examined, as well as remote practices students wish to continue when face-to-face instruction resumes. Results indicate communication and continued services from disability services offices were important to students, as well as remote learning preparation, regular communication, and flexible school policies from institutions. With regard to disability service offices, students expressed a desire for virtual meetings and an online accommodation portal when in-person learning resumed. Recommendations for practice and areas for future research are discussed.

16.
Obes Res Clin Pract ; 16(5): 413-420, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2069534

ABSTRACT

Meal timing is an important consideration when assessing health. The primary outcome of this pilot study was to examine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of early time-restricted eating (eTRE) on diet quality in a sample of college students attending a large southwestern university. Cardiometabolic indices and anthropometric measures were also obtained. The study was planned as an eight-week intervention; however, COVID-19 necessitated laboratory closures that disrupted data collection at week eight. Hence, only data obtained at week zero (baseline) and week four were viable for analysis and are presented herein. Twenty-five healthy participants were randomized to the intervention group (eTRE) which consisted of a daily 6-hour eating window or the control group (CON) which consisted of a daily 16-hour eating window. Each week, participants were permitted one day off from their respective study protocol. Seventeen participants completed all aspects of the study, and diet quality data were obtained from one additional participant (n = 18). Preliminary findings indicate that the 6-hour eTRE protocol may be beneficial for weight reduction and for reducing energy-dense foods typically consumed during the evening hours or later at night. Future research should accommodate individual preferences with regard to the initiation time of the eating window while also providing evidence-based nutrition recommendations to improve diet quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding Behavior , Humans , Pilot Projects , Feasibility Studies , Diet , Students , Eating
17.
Insan ve Toplum ; 10(4):413-444, 2020.
Article in Turkish | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2067231

ABSTRACT

Inequalities based on income and economy and "social inequalities" that directly affect society are not well understood.Therefore, inequalities with different components are measured and studied at best. Social inequality;due to the development of new situations, events and problems, it creates a relatively new set of dimensions, expectations and results. Social inequality;Due to the development of new situations, events and problems, it creates a relatively new set of dimensions, expectations and results. New developments, enlargements and contractions experienced at global and national scale revealed that inequality in education should be discussed again. In this study, on the basis of rural-urban distinctions and socioeconomic differences, the inequalities that emerged in digital education during the Covid-19 pandemic were examined. Depending on these two distinctions, it is aimed to reveal the inequalities in the access and use of digital media, internet and information communication technologies (D-ICT) of university students who try to participate in distance education at home during the epidemic process. A total of 16 students selected from 3 different universities according to age, gender, place of residence, class and socioeconomic status were included in the study. In the research where qualitative method was applied, the data were obtained through in-depth interviews. Interview data were categorized and converted into themes using the Maxqda qualitative data analysis program. The categories and themes combined as a result of open, axial and selective coding were visualized. The individual and family characteristics of the participants, the environment and financial resources of schools, development, emancipation and acculturation factors interactively have effects on inequality, as well as rural-urban segregation and socioeconomic differentiation are evident in digital education inequality. Gelir ve ekonomi temelli eşitsizliklerin yanı sıra toplumu doğrudan etkileyen “sosyal eşitsizlikler” de yeterince anlaşılamamıştır. Bu nedenle farklı bileşenlerle eşitsizlikler en iyi ihtimalle ölçülmekte ve incelenmektedir. Sosyal eşitsizlik;yeni durum, olay ve sorunların gelişmesi nedeniyle göreceli olarak bir dizi yeni boyut, beklenti ve sonuç ortaya çıkarmaktadır. Küresel ve ulusal ölçekte yaşanan yeni gelişme, genişleme ve daralmalar, eğitimde eşitsizliğin tekrar tartışılması gerektiğini ortaya çıkarmıştır. Bu çalışmada da kırsal-kentsel ayrımlar ile sosyoekonomik farklılaşmalar temelinde Covid-19 salgını sürecinde dijital eğitimde ortaya çıkan eşitsizlikler incelenmiştir. Bu iki ayrıma bağlı olarak salgın sürecinde evde uzaktan eğitime katılmaya çalışan üniversite öğrencilerinin dijital medya, internet, bilgi ve iletişim teknolojilerine (DÍB) erişim ve kullanımlarındaki eşitsizliklerin ortaya çıkarılması amaçlanmıştır. Yaş, cinsiyet, ikamet yeri, okuduğu sınıf ve sosyoekonomik statüsüne göre 3 ayrı üniversiteden seçilen toplam 16 öğrenci araştırmaya dâhil edilmiştir. Nitel yöntemin uygulandığı araştırmada, veriler, derinlemesine görüşmelerle elde edilmiştir. Görüşme verileri, Maxqda nitel veri analiz programıyla kategorileştirilmiş ve temalara dönüştürülmüştür. Açık, eksenel ve seçici kodlama neticesinde birleştirilen kategori ve temalar görselleştirilmiştir. Katılımcıların bireysel ve aile özellikleri, okulların çevresi ve mali kaynak durumları, kalkınma, özgürleşme, kültürlenme faktörleri etkileşimli şekilde eşitsizliği ortaya çıkarıcı etkiye sahip olduğu gibi dijital eğitim eşitsizliğinde kırsal-kentsel ayrım ve sosyoekonomik farklılaşmaların belirgin olduğu görülmektedir.

18.
Sustainability ; 14(19):12923, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066481

ABSTRACT

To prevent the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, countries around the world adopted varying degrees of lockdown. The lockdowns restricted the freedom of college students, which led to stress and mental health issues. This study constructed a mediating model to explore the relationship between COVID-19 lockdown stress and Chinese college students’ mental health;the mediating role of fear of missing out (FoMO) was also investigated. A 7-item COVID-19 student stress questionnaire (CSSQ), a 6-item mental health scale, and a 10-item FoMO scale were distributed among 695 college students who experienced lockdown in China. The results showed that COVID-19 lockdown stress was significantly and negatively correlated with mental health, significantly and positively correlated with FoMO, and FoMO was significantly and negatively correlated with mental health. COVID-19 lockdown stress significantly and negatively influenced Chinese college students’ mental health directly and indirectly via the complementary partial mediating effect of FoMO. The results intensify our comprehension of the influence of COVID-19 lockdown stress and mental health problems in Chinese college students and also provide practical suggestions for college educators to address such scenarios.

19.
Sustainability ; 14(19):12873, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066474

ABSTRACT

Guided by the socio-ecological model, the aim of this study was to investigate the predictive strengths of individual, social, and physical environmental factors toward different intensities of physical activity (PA;vigorous PA, moderate PA, walking) and sedentary behavior (SB) among college students. A cross-sectional research design was used. There were 287 college students (Mage = 20.75 ± 2.91;54% female) recruited from a public research university in the Southwestern United States. Participants completed previously validated questionnaires assessing their PA, SB, and perceptions of self-efficacy, social support, and physical environment variables. Correlation and hierarchical regression analyses were performed to examine the associations and the relative contributions of those individual, social, and physical environmental factors to PA and SB, respectively. The findings indicated that self-efficacy, social support from friends, and convenience of using exercise facilities were positively correlated with vigorous PA. Self-efficacy and physical environmental factor such as convenience of using exercise facilities were significantly associated with students’ moderate PA. Physical environmental factors, including convenience of using exercise facilities, satisfaction with neighborhood services, ease of walking to public transportation stop, and detached single-family residence were significantly related to walking, while only detached single-family residence was associated to SB. The results highlight PA interventions may do well to focus on the promotion of individual and environmental variables to increase PA in college students. More evidence is needed to determine the relationships between social ecological factors and SB.

20.
Social Behavior and Personality ; 50(10):1-13, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2065340

ABSTRACT

The Mental Health Changes Indicators Scale (MHCIS) is a brief instrument designed to assess changes in an individual's mental health that occur in response to a specific life event. Although adequate psychometric properties have been demonstrated for this instrument based on classical test theory, the MHCIS has not yet been validated against Rasch measurement theory (RMT). We applied RMT to examine the psychometric properties of the MHCIS using data from 807 Chinese university students. The nominated life event in this study was the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite modest violations of unidimensionality and misfit to the Rasch model, in general, the results supported the validity of the 10-item MHCIS. We recommend further exploration of the generalizability of these results in other populations and across a range of potentially adverse life events.

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