Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 53
Filter
1.
12th IEEE International Conference on Educational and Information Technology, ICEIT 2023 ; : 110-113, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2327367

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way that universities teach and how students learn. Operating system is the basic course of computer, software engineering, big data technology and other majors in colleges and universities, and occupies a very important position in the cultivation of computer categories. In the process of online teaching of the Linux application part of the operating system course, the teaching team explored the online teaching mode of the practical course and summarized the experience of the online teaching of the practical course. © 2023 IEEE.

2.
Reimagining Internationalization and International Initiatives at Historically Black Colleges and Universities ; : 63-72, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2326702

ABSTRACT

Aimed at faculty and administrators, this chapter describes viable and accessible virtual strategic initiatives that Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) can adopt to advance internationalization in general, and global learning in particular. It frames these opportunities in terms of the circumstances precipitated by the coronavirus pandemic. By citing current virtual projects on college and university campuses, it demonstrates that HBCUs can exploit the greater credibility and visibility that virtual learning has recently acquired to launch affordable global learning opportunities for their students that can help prepare them to be globally competent and that can last well beyond the end of the pandemic. © The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2022.

3.
Ensaio ; 31(119), 2023.
Article in English, Portuguese, Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2318029

ABSTRACT

Higher Education has become an increasingly competitive field, and knowledge, its essence, has become a global commodity. Consequently, universities all over the world have been under pressure to respond to growing new demands quickly, dynamically and creatively. In the Brazilian context, overcoming the challenges that these Higher Education institutions face requires a significant effort to adapt and change, especially by public universities. In this essay we analyze the main challenges of Brazilian Higher Education institutions, especially those resulting from the Coronavirus crisis. We focus on challenges such as quality of Higher Education, funding and academic management. To this end, we explore some of the main changes that Higher Education institutions have undergone over time. We also highlight some alternative paths for those challenges, including reflections on opportunities that have arisen following the pandemic. © 2023, Ensaio, All Rights Reserved.

4.
55th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2022 ; 2022-January:3803-3812, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2303292

ABSTRACT

Technology solutions to mitigate repercussions of the COVID-19 pandemic include tools that provide guidelines and interfaces to guide behavior, reduce exposure to the disease, and enable policy-driven avenues to return to a sense of normalcy (e.g., work and school). This paper takes a design science approach to present the justification, design, development, and early assessment of a return-to-work COVID-19 symptom checker and risk assessor. The system was implemented across 34 institutions of health and education in the US State of Alabama, including over 174k users with >4 million total uses and >86k reports of exposure risk between July 2020 and April 2021. Users complied with use policies between 60-74% of the time, with k-12 schools showing higher compliance than colleges and universities. Using system use data and focus group discussions, findings indicate the system was generally accepted, used regularly, facilitated reduction of disease exposure, and enabled a path back to work and school. © 2022 IEEE Computer Society. All rights reserved.

5.
Affilia: Feminist Inquiry in Social Work ; 38(2):263-277, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2298369

ABSTRACT

As COVID-19 reached pandemic levels in March 2020, schools shifted to remote learning. Student parents in higher education had to adapt to their own remote learning and assume responsibility for childcare and their children's education. Few studies have explored the impact of COVID-19 on mothers who are also full-time students. This study utilized a phenomenological approach to understand the lived experiences of mothering students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Student mothers were recruited from a large, public, Hispanic-serving university in a Southern state. We conducted interviews with 15 student mothers who had at least one child under the age of 18 during the first six months of the pandemic. Three main themes emerged from the analyses: (1) successfully meeting educational requirements;(2) dealing with the mental health impact of the pandemic;and (3) changing the institutional structure. The first theme captured strategies mothering students implemented to ensure their own or their children's educational goals were met. The second theme encompassed how mothers handled the stress caused by the pandemic. The third theme explored ways that mothers resisted gendered expectations and norms around care. Implications for policy and social work practice include changing institutional structures to enhance support for mothering students.

6.
14th International Conference on Education Technology and Computers, ICETC 2022 ; : 96-102, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2269808

ABSTRACT

During the outbreak of the COVID-19, colleges and universities across the country carried out online teaching through information-based teaching platforms, and online teaching has developed rapidly, which has a far-reaching impact on Teaching in our country. In the post epidemic era, the continuous promotion of online and offline hybrid teaching mode is of great significance to the reform and innovation of higher education. Taking the course "supply chain management"as an example, around the teaching objectives of the course, develop and build the curriculum resources under the hybrid teaching mode, build the implementation plan of the hybrid teaching mode, summarize the teaching characteristics and shortcomings of the course, and put forward improvement strategies. Practice shows that blended teaching is of great significance to promote educational modernization and improve the quality of talent training. © 2022 ACM.

7.
Journal of Engineering Education ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2259319

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 has spurred a global crisis that has disrupted everyday lives and impacted the traditional methods, experiences, and abilities of higher education institutions' students, faculty, and staff, especially at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Purpose/Hypothesis: Given the pressing need demonstrated by the National Academies to advance the utilization of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education at HBCUs, this study aimed to explore the abrupt transition to remote teaching and learning at HBCUs guided by the following research question: How has COVID-19 impacted the success and persistence of engineering students, faculty, and staff at HBCUs?. Design/Methods: Three surveys were developed, tested, piloted, and sent to HBCU stakeholders using a snowball sampling approach via email and social media outreach. Results: Of the 171 student respondents (126 engineering majors), 79% agreed that not being able to access faculty in person affected their academic performance. Additionally, across all HBCU stakeholders' surveys, students had a statistically significant higher response when asked if the transition to virtual learning increased their overall levels of stress and anxiety. Conclusions: During a global pandemic, HBCUs continue to provide a culture of support and inclusion for students, faculty, and staff in engineering. Increased stress levels experienced by students indicate that a safe and adequate transition back to campus is essential for their social and academic persistence. Due to the well-documented inequities HBCUs faced before the pandemic, the impact of this unprecedented on their continued contributions toward broadening participation in engineering for students should be further explored. © 2023 The Authors. Journal of Engineering Education published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of American Society for Engineering Education.

8.
Southern Economic Journal ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2256409

ABSTRACT

We provide an empirical analysis of the determinants of cumulative COVID infection rates at 1069 U.S. colleges and universities during the 2020–21 academic year. We propose that financially constrained educational institutions faced a trade-off between the reduction of COVID infection risks and an institution's educational, social, reputational, and financial goals. We find that cumulative infection rates are higher at wealthier institutions, measured by higher endowments per student or higher tuition rates. Institutions with lower enrollment yields in admissions also have higher COVID infection rates, perhaps reflecting the greater influence of student preferences on decision making at these institutions. Economies of scale in COVID mitigation emerge gradually over the course of the year. Finally, COVID infection rates do not differ significantly for otherwise similar public and private institutions in states with Democratic governors, but they are significantly higher for public institutions in states with Republican governors. © 2023 The Southern Economic Association.

9.
Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research ; 5(2):203-232, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2248503

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected African American college students and put them at high risk of mental health concerns. Guided by the community resilience model, this study examined how Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) communicated mental health resources during the COVID-19 pandemic. An analysis of HBCUs' website-based communication showed that mental health received minimal importance in response to the ongoing pandemic. Although larger and advanced degree-granting institutions provided a relatively greater amount of mental health resources than smaller institutions, those resources might not be sufficient to buffer against the COVID-19 induced stressors. Providing such inadequate mental resources indicate that many HBCU institutions were unable to provide a necessary supportive environment for the campus communities. HBCUs may establish formal and informal networks with local and regional mental health support organizations and share resources. Specifically, smaller institutions would benefit from such networked support. Additionally, HBCUs need to prioritize mental health in their response to COVID-19 to promote resilience among the student community. Copyright 2022 Authors.

10.
Univers Access Inf Soc ; : 1-16, 2021 Aug 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2252212

ABSTRACT

This study explores whether US post-secondary institutions (PPI) follow philosophies to foster inclusive communities, providing resources for those individuals with disabilities thrive socially, personally, and academically, while there have been no thorough studies conducted to determine web accessibility of the nation's top-ranked PPI library webpages. Additionally, this study pioneers in comparison with the accessibility of PPI's library homepages fighting COVID-19. The study evaluated the library homepages of the premium PPIs based on Money.com's 2019 list of "The Best Colleges in America" via the WAVE web accessibility evaluation tool. The outcomes determined that most of the library homepages analyzed were littered with numerous errors, and the shift to online-based research in learning had no significant impact on the number of errors WAVE detected. The disconcerting findings of this study demonstrate the overall failure to recognize the importance of web accessibility or perhaps even the indifference toward accessibility on the part of the PPI community.

11.
International Wound Journal ; 20(2):238-240, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2238051
12.
Addiction Research & Theory ; 31(1):45-51, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2228102

ABSTRACT

Simultaneous alcohol and cannabis (i.e. marijuana;[SAM]) use is prevalent among college students. There is limited research on expectancy effects for SAM use, which are known correlates of use frequency and mediators of treatment outcomes. We examined the unique associations of both positive and negative alcohol and cannabis expectancies with frequency of SAM use among college students. Participants were 1012 college students (70.9% female, 51.8% white, Mage = 19.63) from seven US universities who reported past-month alcohol and cannabis use (77.2% of the sample reported SAM use). Students completed measures of past-month typical weekly alcohol and cannabis frequency and quantity, alcohol and cannabis expectancies, and SAM frequency through an online self-reported survey. A negative binomial regression revealed that higher-order positive, but not negative, alcohol and cannabis expectancies were significant predictors of SAM frequency above and beyond frequency of alcohol and cannabis use, biological sex, and whether the survey was completed pre- or post-COVID-19 campus closures. Specifically, higher frequency SAM use was associated with weaker positive alcohol and stronger positive cannabis expectancies. A second negative binomial regression including lower-order expectancies found that SAM frequency was associated with weaker social and cognitive and behavioral impairment alcohol expectancies and stronger sexual and social facilitation cannabis and liquid courage alcohol expectancies, specifically. Results highlight the importance of comprehensively examining both higher- and lower-order alcohol and cannabis expectancies when examining SAM frequency, and provide avenues of targeted intervention to reduce SAM use among dual users.

13.
Practice (09503153) ; 35(1):47-56, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2234836

ABSTRACT

Social Work Teaching Partnerships were initiated by the UK government in 2015. The purpose was to improve the quality of social work education and training. In the East Midlands, four Local Authorities (Derbyshire, Derby City, Nottinghamshire and Nottingham City) joined with other local organisations to form the "D2N2" Social Work Teaching Partnership (the D2N2 acronym representing the two Derbyshire and two Nottinghamshire local authorities). The Partnership was formally recognised as a Teaching Partnership in 2016. As part of our commitment to improving social work education and training, we identified a need to develop our practice education (field education) further, by developing a revised and improved placement quality assurance system that replaced the Quality Assurance in Practice Learning (QAPL) system, which was not felt to be fit for purpose. This work formed part of a wider Placement Learning System (PLS) and Practice Development Programme (PDP), which were developed in conjunction with the Universities and employer organisations. The PLS enhanced the voice of the student whilst at the same time allowing us to gather a significant amount of data about the quality of placements;and the PDP allowed us to develop our practice educator cohort. This article explores these developments.

14.
Children & Schools ; 45(1):35-45, 2023.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2188635

ABSTRACT

Urban policymakers, city officials, and community residents utilize neighborhood revitalization initiatives to establish safe and empowered neighborhoods. In 2016, leaders in Columbus, Ohio, launched a neighborhood revitalization effort designed to improve safety, access to opportunities, and economic development in the historically underserved Linden neighborhood. A priority focus involved strengthening Linden schools through the development of two university-assisted community schools (UACS). Using the community collaboration model as a guide, leaders from the schools, university, nonprofit, and local government sectors partnered to support school improvement processes in two Linden K–6 elementary schools. Annual stakeholder surveys have demonstrated marked improvements in perceptions of neighborhood safety, school climate, and the overall learning support system. The prevalence of behavioral incidences among students has decreased. Further, during the COVID-19 pandemic, the UACS model helped sustain student engagement and virtual learning and keep families connected to the schools. This article describes implementation outputs and evaluation outcomes associated with adopting the UACS model in these two Linden elementary schools. Findings contribute to a greater understanding of how UACS can serve as partners in neighborhood revitalization efforts.

15.
2022 International Conference on Information System, Computing and Educational Technology, ICISCET 2022 ; : 200-202, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2136298

ABSTRACT

Affected by the epidemic situation of COVID-19, colleges and universities have adopted online teaching methods one after another, so teachers and students have the opportunity to experience the whole online teaching process. After the COVID-19 come to an end, online teaching will continue to have a corresponding impact on teachers' teaching and students' learning, and will also promote the deepening reform of online teaching. The combination of online and offline modes of instruction is bound to become the normalization mode of college curriculum teaching in the post-epidemic era. Taking the course 'Fundamentals of Programming' as an example, this paper makes an attempt to implement 'online and offline mixed' teaching, so as to study and practice the curriculum reform in the post-epidemic era. © 2022 IEEE.

16.
11th International Conference of Information and Communication Technology, ICTech 2022 ; : 558-562, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2052024

ABSTRACT

Influenced by the COVID-19 epidemic in the past two years, colleges and universities at home and abroad have adopted a combination of online and offline teaching reform, education informatization and intelligent talent training methods, which have become the focus of research for educators. The teaching quality is related to the quality of talent cultivation, and the intelligence, fairness and accuracy of the teaching evaluation system are particularly important. And block chain technology is decentralized and safe and reliable features, so the development of the technology based on big data and chain blocks obeys the law of education development of teaching evaluation system, to solve the shortage of the current appraisal system, and realize the sharing of teaching resources, integrate and optimize the teaching resources, promoting the standardization and standardization of teaching resources construction, To promote the construction and better development of disciplines in colleges and universities. © 2022 IEEE.

17.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2046628

ABSTRACT

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Excellence in Civil Engineering Education (ExCEEd) Teaching Workshop (ETW) started in 1999 and has produced 1035 graduates from 266 colleges and universities throughout the world. ASCE has conducted 44 week-long, in-person workshops without interruption for over two decades. The ExCEEd graduates returned to their home universities and applied the lessons of this workshop to the classes they teach. The details and long-term benefits of the ETW have been reported in many venues. In Spring 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic swept the nation and remained a persistent threat throughout 2021. As a result, the in-person workshops scheduled for Summer 2020 and Summer 2021 were canceled. This paper is the third in a three-part series that describe and assess how ASCE modified and continued the ExCEEd program during this difficult period. This third paper focuses on the behind-the-curtain activities conducted before and during the two-week virtual remote ETW (R-ETW) held from July 5-16, 2021. The findings are shared through the perspectives of the R-ETW Site Coordinator, Content Providers, Mentors, Assistant Mentors, and to a lesser degree, the participants. This paper covers the implementation of the planning and logistics of the R-ETW rehearsals, execution, challenges overcome, assessment of the effort, and recommendations for the future. Effects of the changes are described in the context of the ExCEEd Teaching Model. The challenges and opportunities discussed in this paper are of interest to higher education and professional communities interested in forming or developing virtual workshops or learning communities with missions similar to that of the ASCE ETW. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2022.

18.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2046557

ABSTRACT

The United Nations General Assembly established a set of 17 goals in 2015 known as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). They inspire concerted efforts around the world to be accomplished by the year 2030. Goal 17, “Partnerships for the Goals”, embraces the fundamental strategy to achieve all the goals by the effective collaboration of all nations, institutions, organizations, and individuals. It relies on extensive global awareness as the fundamental ground to build the recognition of diversity and inclusion;striving to consider every perspective in our shared world. Academic institutions, particularly colleges and universities, should take leadership roles in educating the upcoming generation of professionals and leaders to accomplish this mission. Engineering schools and departments are required to demonstrate these as educational outcomes for their students. Specifically, Student Outcomes 2, 3, and 4 of ABET Criterion 3, all involve awareness, communication, and consideration of global contexts. This is critical to address the Sustainable Development goals as the students make up the future workforce in charge of advancing technical solutions for a better and sustainable world. This paper discusses a three-year experience in the Chemical Engineering Department, with the participation of 162 college students, in 33 projects, as a curricular requirement for a capstone course. The project provided a unique opportunity for students to become acquainted with problems around the world and to challenge them to consider multiple solutions. Student teams collaborated with foreign organizations (in the country they chose to address a problem) to analyze and propose solutions for challenges in that country. Activities are organized during the entire semester following project management techniques. They include an early presentation of the proposal, a scheduled progress report presentation, a poster, and a final presentation. Foreign partners are asked to provide their reflections on the experience. All classmates review and peer grade every deliverable from other teams. Students evaluate their teammates' performance and provide a self-assessment of their individual experience at the end of the course. A ChE Global Day was held at the end of the semester to display the posters and presentations to a broad audience with the support of university offices and centers focused on global experiences and international relations. Students earn up to 10% of the definitive grade of the course for these global engagement projects. This approach has proved to be fully sustainable, and with an overwhelming satisfaction of all the participants. It is important to note that the incorporation of a virtual platform during COVID-19 and the continuous monitoring and coaching by the instructor are producing best practices to foster communication between students and stakeholders. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2022

19.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2045394

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused a major disruption to colleges and universities, with many institutions cancelling in-person learning and moving to completely online instruction for a time. Since the pandemic began, institutions of higher education have utilized varying degrees of face-to-face, hybrid and online instruction. These changes have impacted both students and faculty in science and engineering fields. Traditional science and engineering students have had to adapt quickly to new, and largely unwelcome, means of learning. In addition, faculty have had to abruptly alter their teaching to adjust to changes in teaching formats imposed by the pandemic. Using a web-based survey of engineering and computer science programs in US and Canadian universities, this paper studies the challenges introduced to STEM education due to the COVID-19 pandemic from students' perspectives. The survey was administered in face-to-face, hybrid and completely online classes to study students' perceptions and attitudes as well as challenges related to changes in teaching formats during the pandemic. Furthermore, this study assesses students' perceptions about the future of teaching in a post COVID-19 environment. Results of this study provide insights into both current and future impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on engineering and computer science education. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2022.

20.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2045223

ABSTRACT

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Excellence in Civil Engineering Education (ExCEEd) Teaching Workshop (ETW) started in 1999, and it has produced 1035 graduates from 266 colleges and universities throughout the world. ASCE has conducted 44 week-long, in-person workshops without interruption for over two decades. ExCEEd graduates have returned to their home universities and applied the lessons of this workshop to the classes they teach. The details and success of the ETW have been reported in many venues. In Spring 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the nation and remained a persistent threat throughout 2021. As a result, the in-person workshops scheduled for Summer 2020 were canceled and in Summer 2021 was reimagined as a virtual offering. This paper is the first in a three-part series that describe and assess how ASCE modified and continued the ExCEEd program during this difficult period. This paper specifically overviews the response by the ASCE Committee on Faculty Development (CFD) to create the virtual ExCEEd Community Exchange (ECX) following the cancellation of the Summer 2020 ASCE ExCEEd Teaching Workshop. The ECX program is a virtual venue for civil engineering educators to meet and share their ideas and lessons-learned with a broader community. The paper covers the creation of the ECX program, including its motivation, vision, and implementation, and presents opportunities and challenges for the continued success of this virtual community program. Details are provided on the format of these ECX sessions and the topics discussed, along with feedback from ECX presenters, moderators, and attendees. Information from this paper will be helpful to professional societies and other organizations looking for meaningful ways to engage and strengthen communities of engineering educators through virtual professional development programming. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2022.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL