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1.
Global Journal of Social Sciences ; 19:49-51, 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2055814

ABSTRACT

This article seeks to answer: would Africa be able to survive if the virus spreads further and strict measure as seen in Europe are enforced? It is clear from the aforementioned factors in this study that Africa is not ready for an outbreak like COVID-19. The only thing African governments can afford to do right now is vehemently prevent the virus from entering or spreading because the continent already has too many problems to deal with (such as: unhealthy ethnic and religious diversity, terrorism, high levels of corruption, an increasing number of youths with wrong priorities, a poor health sector, political and economic invasion, etc). African governments, institutions, and businesses should take note of how their peers in Europe, America, and Asia managed to alleviate the COVID-2019 crisis with essentially creative means of operation while still achieving the same outcomes, if not better ones. African organisations and businesses should be prepared to significantly strengthen health security by enhancing the continent's overall health and making sure that the land borders are secure if they feel at ease maintaining the status quo without the need for change. Otherwise, African nations ought to consider introducing novel approaches to education, employment, and commerce gradually. They can never predict what infectious diseases or terrorist assaults might one day spread over the continent.

2.
Nigerian Journal of Animal Production ; 49(3):195-212, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2040729

ABSTRACT

The current COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the agricultural value chains in Nigeria to economic uncertainties with the livestock sector at the receiving end of the impact of the accompanying effects. The present study assessed the extent of the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on livestockfarmers. Aweb-based cross-sectional online questionnaire survey was conducted in randomly selected 12 States in Nigeria. Data gathered through the questionnaire included;respondents' demographic characteristics, knowledge and attitude regarding COVID-19 pandemic, extent of impact of the pandemic, farm activities severely affected and mitigation efforts made by the affected livestock farmers. Data obtained were analyzed using descriptive statistics, including frequency count, percentage, mean and confidence interval set at p<0.05. This study revealed that majority (73%) of the livestock farmers were aware of COVID-19 pandemic, 66% practiced intensive farming system while 62% were into poultry production. Knowledge and attitude of livestock farmers regarding COVID-19 revealed that 86% of the respondents believed that COVID-19 did not have a specific drug for treatment, 97% agreed with the principle of hand washing, 70% had hand washing stations on their farms while 59% believed that animals could be infected with the disease. Of the extent of the impact of COVID-19, 42% claimed to have had high blood pressure, 80% lacked funds to run their farms while 27% witnessed the loss of loved ones, 86% of the farmers were severely affected in marketing of their products and services;72%, 52% and 72% were affected in restocking, farm cleaning and transportation, respectively. As a result of the pandemic, 39% sought for loans and reduced labour, 24% stopped payment of salaries while 23% reduced the quantity and quality of feeds given to their animals. The present study highlighted the devastating effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the livestock industry in Nigeria. Therefore, concerted efforts to ensure the survival of the livestock industry must be put in place by individuals and the government at large to salvage current situation and emergency preparedness protocol should be put in place in case of future occurrence.

3.
WIDER Working Papers 2021. (135):29 pp. many ref. ; 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1965129

ABSTRACT

This paper explores agricultural performance of Mozambique, its institutional weaknesses, and the underlying factors that underpin an unsatisfactory performance during many decades. We point to the role of systemic political instability and violence combined with challenges to state legitimacy. Regional divides and lack of market integration continue to influence in a critical and all-encompassing manner. Finally, the way in which the interests of the elite and the influence of donors have affected progress in the agriculture sector suggests the need for concerted reorientation in existing strategies, policies, and priorities. This is reinforced by future challenges, including the extractive industry;population growth and internal migration;national and international markets;climate change;and COVID-19. We highlight the need to place the future of agriculture in Mozambique within a long-term perspective, focusing on the adoption and stabilization of an institutional framework aimed at increasing agricultural productivity and preserving the environment.

4.
Journal of Japan Society of Sports Industry ; 32(2):229-239, 2022.
Article in Japanese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1934540

ABSTRACT

This study focuses on high school athletics. The Japan High School Athletic Federation, which is the central sports organization of the high school athletics competition, and the National High School Athletic Federation, which is the governing body of the high school sports organization, manage the high school athletics category under the umbrella of the National High School Athletic Federation. This paper aimed to analyze the kind of relationship being built with the National Athletics Department, which is responsible for the actual management of the tournament, and to verify whether there is a conflict between the National Athletics Department and the National Athletics Department. Specifically, we analyzed the actual functions of the National High School Championships, the Japan Association of Athletics Federations, and the National High School Championships, and the level of support each organization had at the Inter-High School Championships held during the coronavirus pandemic. Then, based on the articles of incorporation and regulations of each organization, we organized the objectives, business contents, and decision-making of the three organizational operations, and observed conflicts. We found that the National High School Federation and the National High School Federation Land Specialization Department have four local conditions of conflict : "ambiguity of work in charge", "reciprocity of tasks", "common resources", and "mismatch of social evaluation".

5.
Policy Research Working Paper - World Bank 2021. (9805):29 pp. 33 ref. ; 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1918732

ABSTRACT

Do Sahelian countries face specific risks of water-related conflict Sahelian countries face growing fragility and climate challenges-especially those belonging to the Group of Five Sahel States (known as the G5 Sahel)-Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, and Niger. This study examines how their relation to water availability and irrigation infrastructure factors in. It documents that the G5 Sahel countries, given their high baseline water scarcity and state fragility, face a higher risk of conflict over water resources compared to the rest of Africa. This is demonstrated through empirical analyses using geospatial data and exploiting (i) climate-induced variation in water availability, and (ii) an event study analysis of conflict trends, which sharply increased post-2010 in the region following the Arab Spring and the rise of the Boko Haram. Irrigated areas are found to be important for buffering against weather shocks but are also more prone to targeting during conflict events compared to non-irrigated regions. The evidence suggests that this reflects increased competition for scarce (fertile) resources between state and rebel groups on this climate frontier with a well-documented history of agropastoral conflict. Other regions of Africa are not found to experience similar conflict related to water resources. These findings are especially pertinent for informing projects and policy interventions in fragile countries as post-COVID-19 recovery and climate action plans are rolled out.

6.
CCAFS Working Paper 2021. (379):54 pp. 5 ref. ; 2021.
Article in Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1918555

ABSTRACT

This study was carried out, between March and May 2021, in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, to: (a) collect information and analyse the opinions, values, experiences and behaviours of rural youth in these three countries of the SICA region in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact at different levels: education, work, health, violence, gender relations, citizen/political participation and associativism, environment, climate change and natural disasters;(b) investigate, in particular, how this pandemic influences the expectations and future projects of young people at a personal, educational and work level;and (c) analyse the information gathered from a gender and intersectional analysis that allows identifying and systematizing the differences and inequalities between the genders in all the selected aspects. The study also inquired about the opinions and explanations of rural youth about different aspects of the COVID 19 pandemic, among others, ideas about its "origin", the consequences at the social and environmental levels, and prioritized means of obtaining information, with the purpose of highlighting the frameworks of meaning that are built on this stage.

7.
Odisha Review ; : 84-85, 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904975

ABSTRACT

This article talks about future water crisis management after the COVID-19 pandemic. Scenarios such as water use wastage due to hand washing and eutrophication with soap and detergent and water spray as sanitary measures in cities and metros were highlighted as examples and part of the crisis. More than this, climate change in tandem with hydrologic variability were viewed to have a profound impact on the water sector as well. Finally, the article predicts that in 2025, water shortages will be more prevalent due to rising demand and conflict, and how governments will find solutions to such issues moving forward.

8.
Journal of Global Health Reports ; 6(e2022002), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1893656

ABSTRACT

Background: In May 2020, the international non-governmental organization Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE) sought to enable health systems in Tanzania to address COVID-19 health response. CARE leveraged existing partnerships with the Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly and Children and the President's Office of Regional Administration and Local Government in the largest geographic region of Tanzania, Tabora Region. At the time, the government declared Tanzania to be free from COVID-19 and did not permit partners to implement COVID-19 programming. In this context, CARE implemented integrated health systems strengthening support for government response to not only COVID-19 but also other infectious diseases.

9.
Texila International Journal of Public Health ; 10(1), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1865691

ABSTRACT

As we move towards HIV epidemic control in Cameroon, we strive to limit the number of new infections by maintaining on-treatment PWHIV. The emergence of the Covid-19 pandemic may cause interruptions in HIV treatment and slow progression. COVID-19 control measures have caused;the lockdown of businesses, some health services, and imposed work from home, with intimate partners and more people spending longer hours together at home. As a consequence, there is an increased risk of gender-based violence (GBV). GBV can affect adherence to treatment in PWHIV and prevent them from accessing health services. The main objective of the study was to determine the effect of Covid-19 and GBV on the uptake of HIV services by assessing interruptions in treatment. Using a structured questionnaire, demographic data, Information on COVID-19 and intimate partner violence were obtained from 339 participants between 15 and 60 years old, taking HIV treatment at the Touboro district hospital. We used the Antiretroviral treatment register of the health facility to extract data on the frequency and duration of interruption in treatment. The Prevalence of intimate partner violence was high in our study participants, although interruption in treatment was only significant in respondents who reported verbal abuse. A strong association was observed between Covid 19 and interruption in treatment. There was equally an association between Covid-19 and an increase in intimate IPV. Other Socio-demographic variables found to affect interruption in treatment were level of Education of the partner, Age difference with intimate partner greater than 10 years, and early years on antiretroviral therapy. According to the study, Both Gender-based violence (IPV) and Covid-19 affect interruption in antiretroviral treatment.

10.
PLoS Global Public Health ; 2(4), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1854966

ABSTRACT

Domestic abuse is a significant public health issue effecting 2.4 million adults in England and Wales each year. In March 2020 the World Health Organisation declared a global pandemic following the outbreak of COVID-19. As a result, the UK moved to a period of lockdown. There is growing evidence that highlights the unintended negative consequences of lockdown, particularly in households where abuse is present. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of frontline specialist domestic abuse staff who continued to support victims during the period of lockdown to understand the impact of COVID-19 on service delivery. Ten, one to one, semi structured qualitative interviews were carried out with staff from a specialist domestic abuse service that operates in regions across the north-east of England. All participants had been involved in service delivery for a minimum of 12 months prior to March 2020 and had continued to deliver services throughout the UK initial lockdown period between March and July 2020. Each interview was transcribed verbatim, anonymised, then subjected to thematic analysis. Six themes were developed from the data covering: emergency support for victims;wider service efficiencies;victim safety;group work versus one-to-one support;criminal and family courts;and workforce development. While lockdown resulted in increased levels and severity of referrals, the switch to remote working brought a range of service efficiencies including time and money saved by negating the need to travel. Remote working also enhanced support offered to male victims and those with mental health issues but not those in rural locations with poor connectivity and those effected by the digital divide. Services should not underestimate the long-term benefits of peer support both to clients and staffs.

11.
PLoS Global Public Health ; 2(4), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1854944

ABSTRACT

Cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) detected, and COVID-19 associated mortality increased since the first case was confirmed in Uganda. While adherence to WHO-recommended measures to disrupt COVID-19 transmission has since been implemented, it has been reported to be sub-optimal. An increase in intimate partner violence (IPV) cases was linked to enforcement of COVID-19 lockdowns and other preventive measures especially in informal settings of Kampala. We determined the association between adherence to COVID-19 preventive measures and intimate partner violence among women dwelling in informal settings in Kampala, Uganda. Between July and October 2020, we conducted a three-month prospective cohort study of 148 women living in informal settlements of Kampala during the COVID-19 lockdown and easing of restrictive measures. Participants were surveyed at baseline, at 3-weeks and 6-weeks (endline). The dependent variable was adherence to COVID-19 preventive measures (remained adherent vs poorly adherent) between baseline and endline surveys. This composite outcome variable was computed from implementing all four variables: social distancing, wearing face masks, frequent hand washing and use of hand sanitizers at baseline and endline surveys. The key independent variable was IPV measured as experiencing at least one form of physical, emotional, or sexual IPV. Covariates were age, education, marital status, household size, occupation, and having problems getting food. Adjusted logistic regression analyses tested the independent association between adherence to COVID-19 preventive measures and intimate partner violence. Among 148 respondents, the mean age (SD) was 32.9 (9.3) years, 58.1% were exposed to at least one form of IPV, and 78.2% had problems getting food. Overall, 10.1% were poorly adherent to COVID-19 preventive measures during the first COVID-19 wave. After controlling for potential confounders, remaining adherent to COVID-19 preventive measures were more likely to experience intimate partner violence when compared to women who were poorly adherent to COVID-19 preventive measures during the first COVID-19 wave in Uganda [OR 3.87 95%CI (1.09, 13.79)]. Proportions of women in informal settlements of Kampala experiencing at least one form of IPV during the first COVID-19 wave is substantial. Remaining adherent to preventive measures for COVID-19 transmission may increase IPV exposure risk among women living in informal settlements in Kampala. Contextualizing COVID-19 interventions to the needs of marginalized and vulnerable women and girls in informal settings of Kampala is warranted. Processes to integrated violence prevention and response strategies into the Uganda COVID-19 prevention strategy are underscored.

12.
Journal of Museum Education ; 46(4):406-416, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1839846

ABSTRACT

The dual pandemic that started in 2020, COVID-19 and events revealing systemic racism, has increased awareness about violence against Asian American and Pacific Islander communities across the United States. This article describes how the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, a "museum without walls," collaborated with a group of educators to co-create video resources for teaching and learning AAPI histories and stories.

13.
Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal ; 24(2), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1836514

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly across the globe through coughing, sneezing, droplet inhalation, and contact. Objectives: The current study aimed to assess the impact of the fear of COVID-19 infection on functionality in women with breast cancer.

14.
Facta Universitatis: Series Physical Education and Sport ; 19(3):257-269, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1836312

ABSTRACT

The goal of this paper is to provide a review of the transfer of rights to broadcasting sporting events as one source of financing sporting activities and clubs through comparative practice and current legal regulations. Sports and the law are deeply intertwined, primarily due to the fact that sports are exposed to various challenges, ranging from doping, prevention of violence at sports manifestations, all the way to competition regulations, managing sports organizations and business processes. In this paper, we will analyze the positive legal regulations that enable the realization of income based on the right to broadcast. Sources of financing are necessary for the conduct of sporting activities. The most successful clubs generate the biggest part of their revenue through leasing broadcasting rights for sporting events and marketing. Broadcasting sporting events not only enables generation of direct revenue, but also removes the shackles of previously existing spatial barriers and thus contributes to the popularity of sports, athletes and their clubs. Occurrences such as the coronavirus pandemic have led to the organization of sporting events in controlled conditions, without the presence of an audience or with numerous limitations and restrictions. In such situations, numerous institutions have offered interactive forms of communication with the consumers (online museum tours, concerts, etc.), thus not only minimizing losses, but also maintaining contact with the audience. This situation has proven the significance of digital communication with the consumers. Even though the year 2020 went by without the previously planned Olympics and, in most cases, without sports fans in the stands, the sporting industry recorded a jump (from 388.28 billion dollars in 2020 to 440.77 billion of dollars in 2021). The growth in earnings was achieved predominantly due to the increase in media revenues.

15.
Intervention, the Journal of Mental Health & Psychosocial Support in Conflict Affected Areas ; 19(2):145-270, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1786962

ABSTRACT

A special section in this issue includes four articles on suicide prevention and response. This section also features a range of other articles. The first is a thought-provoking commentary by Cherepanov (pp. 149-154) concerning mental health interventions in complex political contexts. The second by Bunn et al. (see pp. 155-179) is an umbrella review of the evidence about supporting nonspecialists in delivering mental health interventions. The third by Akbay-Safi et al. (see pp. 180-186) describes the experiences of the INSAN Psychosocial Support Centre in implementing Problem Management Plus in training survivors of gender-based violence in Turkey in the face of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Five field reports in Uganda, Iraq, Bangladesh, Nepal and Ethiopia are also included. Lastly, there are two personal reflections. In the first, Womersley (pp. 261-265) reflects on the experience of refugees in relation to trauma, shame and suicidality. The author brings a personal narrative too of the impact of dealing with this as frontline workers. In their contribution, Sevenants (pp. 266-270) brings personal reflections based on lived experience interlinked with views on adolescence and suicidality.

16.
Econom..a Sociedad y Territorio ; 22(68):237-264, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1744446

ABSTRACT

This paper aims to analyze possible effects of the economic crisis caused by Covid-19 on criminality, poverty and mortality rates in Brazilian municipalities. With this purpose, the year 2015 was analyzed for being the period when the country went through the greatest recession in recent years. The Propensity Score Matching Method was used to evaluate the impact of a sharp decrease in the Gross Domestic Product. The data surveyed showed that no difference of effect was observed in the variation of these variables between the municipalities that experienced the recession and those where there was economic growth.

17.
Orient Journal of Medicine ; 34(1/2):17-27, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1743551

ABSTRACT

Background: Information on the effects of the coronavirus pandemic on adolescents and young people, who are in a critical phase of transition to adulthood is sparse. We evaluated the effects of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) among adolescents and young people living in Southeast Nigeria.

18.
Soccer and Society ; 22(1/2):152-165, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1722035

ABSTRACT

The presence of spectators in sport is considered a factor that leads to home advantage (HA). The objective of this research was to analyse the difference of wins, points and goals both at home and away depending on the presence or absence of a crowd and other possible covariates such as budget or average attendance at the stadium in times post COVID. The sample is made up of eight football leagues (soccer) from Germany, Spain, Italy, England and Austria. The results show that there are no significant differences between playing with or without a crowd, except in the German and Spanish top leagues. Even so, there is a tendency in most competitions to play worse at home and better away from home when there are no spectators. These findings do not generally support the theory of social facilitation;so it is concluded that there must be other factors that explain HA.

19.
Journal of Tourism Futures ; 7(3):377-389, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1638550

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This paper aims to examine the antagonistic coexistence of different tourism imaginaries in global post-viral social landscapes. Such antagonisms may be resolved at the expense of the ethics of tourism mobility, if not adjudicated by post-human reflexivity. Currently, unreflexive behaviours involve the refusal to conform to lifesaving "stay-at-home" policies, the tendency to book holidays and the public inspection of death zones. Design/methodology/approach: Each of the consumption styles explored in this paper to discuss post-COVID-19 tourism recovery corresponds to at least one tourist imaginary, antagonistically placed against social imaginaries of moral betterment, solidarity, scientific advancement, national security and labour equality. A multi-modal collection of audio-visual and textual data, gathered through social media and the digital press, is categorised and analysed via critical discourse analysis. Findings: Data in the public domain suggest a split between pessimistic and optimistic attitudes that forge different tourism futures. These attitudes inform different imaginaries with different temporal orientations and consumption styles. Social implications: COVID-has exposed the limits of the capacity to efficiently address threats to both human and environmental ecosystems. As once popular tourist locales/destinations are turned by COVID-2019s spread into risk zones with morbid biographical records their identities alter and their imaginaries of suffering become anthropocentric. Originality/value: Using Castoriadis' differentiation between social and radical imaginaries, Foucault's biopolitical analysis, Sorokin's work on mentalities and Sorel's reflections on violence, the author argue that this paper has entered a new phase in the governance and experience of tourism, which subsumes the idealistic basis of tourist imaginaries as cosmopolitan representational frameworks under the techno-cultural imperatives of risk, individualistic growth through the adventure ("edgework") and heritage preservation. This paper also needs to reconsider the contribution of technology (not technocracy) to sustainable post-COVID-19 scenarios of tourism recovery.

20.
Tourism Management Perspectives ; 40(92), 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1606231

ABSTRACT

Sustainable tourism development, including tourism's COVID-19 recovery, requires a holistic view of environmental and community benefits, including access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). This study presents a system-wide Inclusive WASH in tourism framework for destinations. Using a qualitative approach including interviews and focus groups, the framework is applied at three system scales: hotels, the community and wider destination to assess the current WASH situation in Mandalika, Lombok, Indonesia, a water-scarce destination earmarked for rapid development. Findings highlight differences in Inclusive WASH practices between hotels and communities, the potential for conflict and gendered inequalities. Barriers linked to system elements, structure and the enabling environment are identified. Addressing inequitable planning processes, improving stakeholder engagement and creating tools for hotels to improve Inclusive WASH can contribute to improving destination value. Findings are relevant for practitioners, government and community organisations integrating Sustainable Development Gaols 5 and 6 into tourism development and recovery.

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