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1.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; JOUR(12-B):No Pagination Specified, 83.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2101880

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, countless Americans found themselves isolated at home, caring for an ill family member who was positive for COVID-19. Caregivers that do not have training in a health or medical profession are referred to as informal caregivers. Informal caregivers during the COVID-19 pandemic generally have no prior experience with such a high level of care and uncertainty, leading to significant burden and distress. Evidence presented in recent studies reveal a growing concern about the stressors associated with being a family caregiver (Ferrell et al., 2018). For example, spousal caregivers in the United States reported experiencing a 63% higher death risk than non-spousal caregivers (Jackson, 2015;Panyavin et al., 2015). Isolation and disconnection from resources to help with this strain further influence the toll on caregivers. The current study will build upon previous resilience research, along with research on informal caregivers' experience of burden and distress. Using survey data collected during COVID-19 and a path analytic model, this research seeks to better understand important predictors of resilience and wellbeing in the current pandemic. Specifically, this study aims to determine the impact of practicing internal coping mechanisms such as self-efficacy and optimism, and external coping mechanisms such as preparedness, social connectedness, and lifestyle change while caregiving for someone during the last 30 days of the pandemic. Further, it will analyze how the aforementioned coping mechanisms contribute to resilience and well-being in caregivers. COVID-19 stress will be examined as a moderator to coping and is anticipated to result in less resilience and well-being. As the impact of this virus on different populations still remains largely unknown, this study adds to the limited research on predictors of individual resilience and well-being to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and gives insight into under-analyzed experiences held by caregivers during these challenging times. Results supported that all hypothesized coping variables, optimism, self-efficacy, preparedness, social support, and lifestyle behaviors, have an essential role in maintaining well-being in the face of burden or distress. Additionally, research displayed the importance of positive perspective and behavioral change when performed simultaneously, as well as the critical role internal coping mechanisms play in buffering against COVID-19 stress. Clinical implications and recommendations for future research are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

2.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; JOUR(12-B):No Pagination Specified, 83.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2101705

ABSTRACT

Currently, there is minimal research regarding the impact of the current Covid-19 health crisis on Latinx immigrant families. This study explores overall parenting stress and parenting stress directly related to the current Covid-19 health crisis in Latinx immigrant mothers with children currently receiving mental health services. Additionally, it examines how Immigrant Latinx families are being impacted and their needs during the Covid-19 health crisis. Semi-structured interviews were conducted on twenty Latinx immigrant mothers currently experiencing parenting stress and have children currently receiving mental health services. Participant responses were considered using the Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis method. An analysis showed themes such as overall negative impact of the Covid-19 Pandemic, negative impact on mental/emotional health, and overall need during the Covid-19 Pandemic. The findings showed that Latinx immigrant families currently receiving mental health services experienced an overall negative impact on their lives. The principal findings also demonstrated that Latinx immigrant families' mental/ emotional health was negatively impacted and had significantly experienced higher levels of parenting stress. Findings further revealed a need for basic needs, more mental health support/ professional help, and school support to help address areas of impact in the lives of Latinx immigrant families. Clinical implications include providing culturally sensitive care to Latinx immigrant families and a better sense of how the Covid-19 health crisis affected Latinx families, including their overall experiences and needs related to the pandemic that mental health clinicians are serving. Further research is needed to study the experiences of all immigrant Latinx family members, Latinx immigrant families who only have one parent, Latinx immigrant mothers from various Latin American countries, and Latinx immigrant families with diverse acculturation levels and coping practices. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

3.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 72(8): 1564-1571, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2101070

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To find the moderating role of social support and creative coping, and the mediating role of cyberchondria in relationship between fear of coronavirus disease-2019 and stress in university students. METHODS: The correlational study was conducted at the Lahore Garrison University, Lahore, Pakistan, between May and September 2020, and comprised students regardless of gender and age from different public and private universities across Pakistan. Data was collected online using Fear of Coronavirus Disease-2019 Scale, Cyberchondria Severity Scale, Creative Coping Strategies Scale, Social Support Survey, Perceived Stress Scale and Perception of Academic Stress Scale. Data was analysed using SPSS 22. RESULTS: Of the 205 subjects, 83(40.5%) were males and 122(59.5%) were females. The overall mean age was 21.22±1.84 years. Fear of coronavirus disease-2019 had significant positive relationship with cyberchondria, and cyberchondria had significant positive relationship with creative coping and academic stress (p<0.05). Social support had significant negative relationship with general stress (p<0.05). There was significant interaction among fear of coronavirus disease-2019, creative coping, social support and cyberchondria in predicting general stress (p<0.05). Fear of coronavirus disease-2019 alone did not predict stress (p>0.05), but it significantly predicted cyberchondria which, in turn, predicted stress (p<0.05). Creative coping and social support significantly moderated the relationship involving fear of coronavirus disease-2019, cyberchondria and general stress (p<0.05). The female subjects utilised more creative coping strategies, received more social support, and had higher levels of general stress compared to the males (p<0.05), while the male subjects had more mistrust on medical professionals (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The findings are important for students, parents and teachers to understand the role of social support to reduce the fear of coronavirus disease-2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Female , Humans , Young Adult , Adult , Universities , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adaptation, Psychological , Fear , Social Support , Students
4.
Vaccine ; 2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096117

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought to light the importance of identifying factors associated with vaccine hesitancy. Disease threat and coping responses are central to health behavior engagement and present potential alterable targets for intervention. PURPOSE: To examine the roles of perceived threat of COVID-19 and coping in vaccine hesitancy, we examined how coping strategies involving approach and avoidance interact with perceived threat of COVID-19 to predict vaccine hesitancy. METHODS: We used data from 1570 North American participants who reported their vaccine hesitancy as part of a longitudinal study assessing psychosocial responses to the pandemic. We used logistic regression models and mean scores of perceived threat of COVID-19, approach coping, and avoidance coping from prior timepoints to predict vaccine hesitancy in December 2020, when COVID-19 vaccines were first being approved for use in North America. RESULTS: Low perceived threat of COVID-19 was associated with greater likelihood of being vaccine hesitant. However, approach coping moderated this association, such that people who engaged in more approach coping were less likely to be vaccine hesitant even when they did not feel personally threatened by COVID-19. In contrast, avoidance coping was associated with greater likelihood of vaccine hesitancy regardless of perceived threat of COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Our results illustrate the contributions of approach and avoidance coping to vaccine hesitancy and in doing so, provide preliminary evidence for coping behavior to serve as a target for intervention to reduce vaccine hesitancy.

5.
IFE PsychologIA ; JOUR:115-127, 30.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-2092834

ABSTRACT

AJOL : Limited quantitative data exist on resilient coping among the unemployed and employed people during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study examined resilient coping during the COVID-19 pandemic in Nigeria. A cross-sectional research design was utilized via social media. Two hundred and eighty-two participants (age range = 18-62 years) were recruited using a snowball sampling technique. Participants filled out a standardized questionnaire comprising a demographic section and a brief resilient coping scale. Data were analyzed using the IBM SPSS Statistics version 25.0. Statistical significance was accepted at p < .05. The employed group scored significantly higher on resilient coping than the unemployed group (t (280) = 4.08, p <.01). Age had no significant effect (F (1,279) = 3.237;p>.05;np2 = .012) on resilient coping. Employment status had a significant effect (F (1,279) = 7.549;p<.01;np2 = .027) on resilient coping. Employment status had a significant effect on resilient coping by 2.7%. However, there was no significant interaction effect of age and employment status on resilient coping (F (1,279) = 3.137;p>.05). Male participants scored significantly higher on resilient coping than female participants (t (274) = 3.15, p <.01). The authors recommend that health professionals such as clinical psychologists and other concerned bodies should provide targeted psychosocial support interventions for the unemployed group and females in Nigeria during the COVID-19 pandemic

6.
Psychiatria Danubina ; JOUR:161-171, 33.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2092612

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim is to investigate anxiety prevalence among the healthcare workers during COVID-19 pandemic and the also relationship of "significant clinical anxiety" with coping styles and the relatedfactors. Subjects and methods: An online questionnaire was performed to evaluate the anxiety responses of544 healthcare workers, the adopted coping styles and the related factors during COVID-19 pandemic. The questionnaire included the subsections of sociodemographic data, other clinical data and the items on exposure to social media, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) Scale and Coping Styles Scale Brief Form. Result(s): Minimal, mild, moderate and severe anxiety were present in 214 (39.3%), 191 (35.1%), 95 (17.5%) and 44 (8.1%) participants, respectively. GAD-7 score was >10 in 139(25.6%) of the participants indicating "significant clinical anxiety". Being female and a nurse were associated with significant clinical anxiety. In addition, theparameters such as "concern about COVID-19, concern about infect COVID-19 to relatives, unwillingness to work, frequency of social media use about COVID-19, sleep disturbances and experiencing somatic symptoms" were observed to be extremely significantly more common in the healthcare workers with "significant clinical anxiety" than those without that mental condition. The regression analysis revealed that higher adoption of using emotional social support, one of the emotional focused coping styles and behavioral disengagement, one of the ineffektive focused coping styles are considered to be predictor of significant clinical anxiety. Whereas, positive reinterpretation, one of the emotional focused coping styles was a predictor in reduction of significant clinical anxiety. Also more frequent exposure to social media and sleep disturbances were the predictors of significant clinical anxiety in the healthcare staff. Conclusion(s): Our results have emphasized the factors that should be taken into account and application of coping styles that may be functional in protecting mental health of the healthcare workers in their struggle against a huge disaster affecting worldwide societies. Copyright © Medicinska naklada - Zagreb, Croatia

7.
Psychiatria Danubina ; JOUR:372-378, 33.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2092506

ABSTRACT

Background: Psychological impacts among healthcare professionals have increased significantly due to the increasing number of COVID-19 cases. This study aimed to identify stress and coping strategies among healthcare professionals in Saudi Arabia during the COVID-19 outbreak. Subjects and methods: A cross-sectional study online survey was conducted for health care professionals during a peak of COVID-19 from March to June 2020 at different healthcare institutions at KSA (n=342). Result(s): 6L[W\ILYH SHUFHQW RI UHVSRQGHUV RIWHQ DQG DOZD\V IHHO IHDUV DERXW LQIHFWion and subsequent effects on themselves, the patient, and the family. 57% of them stated that they felt sometimes depressed mode and 47% anxiety during the outbreak. Eighty-four percent of the respondent always focusing on prevention as the first biosecurity measures such as hand-washing habits and using hand sanitizer, and 38.3% of them make sometimes relax and rest. While half of the responses (50%) sometimes had physical exercise. Also, thirty-eight percent joined sometimes community and/or group online chat groups, and 56.1% always keep contact with family and friends through social messaging or phone calls. Conclusion(s): Understanding this topic is important for healthcare organizations, effective strategies, and programs is needed to provide holistic staff care and wellbeing during outbreaks that focus on the value of mental and emotional support. Copyright © 2021 Medicinska Naklada Zagreb. All rights reserved.

8.
Turyzm/Tourism ; JOUR(1):219-224, 32.
Article in English, Polish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2091241

ABSTRACT

The detrimental impact of the COVID-19 on the world has ensued unrest amongst people. The reverberations of the life-threatening virus are conspicuous in all realms of life culminating in physical and psychological disturbance. The fear of loss of life, threatened livelihood and enforced seclusion has resulted in psychological morbidities. The existing literature demonstrates the positive effects of spirituality and religion in the life of someone mentally ailing as an efficient way of coping with problems. Spirituality is believed to provide positive emotions such as hope, courage and perspective to individuals. The current article based on a review of the literature highlights the burgeoning of post-pandemic spiritually-inclined travel to restore the balance of life. It adds to current knowledge on the effect of the pandemic on the human psyche and the mitigating effects of spirituality. The results also allow better marketing, management, and design techniques for the spiritual tourism product by providing knowledge on tourist behaviour post-pandemic. The conclusions from the review aim to evoke governments to accord more attention towards the mental health of individuals and advance programmes to help the distressed. © by the author, licensee University of Lodz – Lodz University Press, Lodz, Poland.

9.
Academic resilience: Personal stories and lessons learnt from the COVID-19 experience ; CHAP: 25-37,
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2087959

ABSTRACT

During the rapid transition online, university educators had to reconsider how they supported students with disabilities and neurological differences in accessing a high-quality remote learning experience. This chapter explores my personal experiences as an Early Career Academic (ECA) tasked with supporting our faculty during the transition to remote learning. By collating my personal experiences leading up to and throughout this period, I reflect on my own coping strategies required to fulfill this role. I also explore the forms of resilience that I utilised to support my colleagues who had a spectrum of perspectives and knowledge of inclusive digital pedagogies. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

10.
Nurs Forum ; 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088296

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Evidence suggests that support groups enhance nurses' professional quality of life (QOL), and positive professional QOL is associated with better patient and nurse outcomes. This study examined the effect of a unit-level support group on the professional QOL of nurses working on a progressive care unit-turned-dedicated-COVID-19 unit. AIM: We hypothesized that a professionally facilitated Compassion Rounds (CR) support group would improve compassion satisfaction (CS) and reduce compassion fatigue (CF) among COVID-19 unit nurses. METHODS: For this pre/post, within-group trial we recruited an inclusive, convenience sample of 84 nurses on a COVID-19 unit within a 377-bed, Magnet®-designated hospital. The 10-week, CR consisted of biweekly meetings, and the ProQOL version 5 measured pre/post CS and CF. RESULTS: Paired t-testing showed that CS scores fell after CR (n = 10; p = .005), while scores rose for CF burnout (p = .05) and secondary traumatic stress (p = .008). Results were similar for unpaired analysis (N = 38; p < .05). IMPLICATIONS/CONCLUSION: Although pandemic-related challenges likely overwhelmed CR's potential to improve professional QOL, CR may have prevented worse deterioration of work-life quality. CR may also create clinically meaningful improvements for groups or individual nurses, and thus enhance nurse and patient outcomes.

11.
Emerg Med Australas ; 2022 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088099

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: EDs are highly demanding workplaces generating considerable potential for occupational stress experiences. Previous research has been limited by a focus on specific aspects of the working environment and studies focussing on a range of variables are needed. The aim of the present study was to describe the perceptions of occupational stress and coping strategies of ED nurses and doctors and the differences between these two groups. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted at a public metropolitan hospital ED in Queensland, Australia. All ED nurses and doctors were invited to participate in an electronic survey containing 13 survey measures and one qualitative question assessing occupational stress and coping experiences. Descriptive statistics were employed to report stressors. Responses to open-ended questions were thematically analysed. RESULTS: Overall, 104 nurses and 35 doctors responded (55.6% response rate). Nurses reported higher levels of both stress and burnout than doctors. They also reported lower work satisfaction, work engagement, and leadership support than doctors. Compared with doctors, nurses reported significantly higher stress from heavy workload/poor skill mix, high acuity patients, environmental concerns, and inability to provide optimal care. Thematic analysis identified high workload and limited leadership and management support as factors contributing to stress. Coping mechanisms, such as building personal resilience, were most frequently reported. CONCLUSIONS: The present study found organisational stressors adversely impact the well-being of ED nurses and doctors. Organisational-focused interventions including leadership development, strategic recruitment, adequate staffing and resources may mitigate occupational stress and complement individual coping strategies. Expanding this research to understand broader perspectives and especially the impact of COVID-19 upon ED workers is recommended.

12.
Journal of Affective Disorders ; JOUR
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2082583

ABSTRACT

Background The prevalence of depression symptoms among U.S. adults increased dramatically during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic. We sought to understand the impact of the pandemic on people with a history of depression. Methods In June 2020, a national sample of 5023 U.S. adults, including 760 reporting past/current diagnoses of depression, completed survey measures related to the COVID experience, coping, anxiety, depression, and PTSD. Results After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, a history of depression increased the odds of negative effects of pandemic on multiple aspects of life: routines, access to mental health treatment, alcohol use, prescription painkiller use, and other drug use. Those with a history of depression also scored significantly higher on the PHQ-8, GAD-7, and PDS-5 (all ps < 0.0001). Greater use of adaptive coping strategies was significantly associated with lower scores, and greater use of maladaptive strategies with higher scores. Individuals reporting a history of depression reported greater use of both adaptive and maladaptive strategies. Conclusions Adaptive coping strategies appear to be protective and help regulate symptomatology, suggesting that particular focus during the clinical encounter on developing tools to promote well-being, alleviate stress, and decrease perceptions of helplessness could mitigate the effects.

13.
Revista Costarricense De Psicologia ; JOUR(1):67-80, 41.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2082523

ABSTRACT

The aim of the research was to determine the personal and family coping strategies as the confinement experience developed. due to the COVID-19 health contingency. in an adult population of the south-central zone of Chile. The study was quantitative, with a cross-sectional, associative design. The sample consisted of 251 young adults, 139 (55.4%) women, and 112 (44.6%) men, with an age range of 18 to 40 years. The instruments applied were the Coping Strategies Inventory (CSI) and the Personal Evaluation Scale of Family Functioning in Crisis Situations (F-COPE). Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, Pearson's r correlation tests. Student's t-test. and one-way ANOVA. The results show that an individual's coping is positively related to his/her family one, with significant differences according to gender and age. The findings are discussed according to the reviewed theoretical and empirical background.

14.
J Am Coll Health ; : 1-4, 2022 Oct 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082231

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine the associations between coping methods and college adjustment among a sample of U.S. undergraduate students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants: We used a sample of 117 undergraduate students between the age of 18-25 years old. Approximately 76% of the sample identified as women and 58% identified as White. Methods: Participants completed online questionnaires that assessed the use of forward-focused coping, trauma-focused coping, and several domains of college adjustment (i.e., academic adjustment, social adjustment, personal-emotional adjustment, and attachment). We used multiple regression to identify the association between coping methods and college adjustment, using race and gender as control variables. Results: Forward-focused coping methods were significantly and positively related to academic adjustment, social adjustment, and attachment, while and trauma-focused coping methods were significantly and negatively related to personal-emotional adjustment. Conclusions: The use of forward-focused coping methods may be beneficial for undergraduate students during the COVID-19 pandemic.

15.
Jamba ; 14(1): 1284, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080610

ABSTRACT

Hospital health care professionals (HCPs) play a vital and crucial role in saving the lives of patients afflicted with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). As the incidence of the disease keeps increasing, health care workers in hospitals face difficulties in discharging their duties. This study aimed to describe the lived experiences of HCPs. Particularly, it determined their challenges, motivations and coping strategies to craft grassroots policies for the enhancement of health care delivery in the Northern Philippines. Employing a phenomenological study design, 24 study participants were purposively selected and their narratives were elicited through focus group discussion. Responses were transcribed verbatim. After data analyses, the challenges, coping strategies and motivations of HCPs were identified. Results revealed that HCPs experienced a lot of challenges. Some of these were brought by the rapid changes in their environment as HCPs. Moreover, there was lack of comprehensive strategies that made them unprepared along with a lack of human and material resources. Furthermore, they experienced physical fatigue because of overwhelming workload, anxiety, fear and discrimination that led to depression. Despite these difficulties, they remain resilient because of religious coping, being true to their duty as HCPs and the support they receive from their fellows. Thus, the study recommends that protocols to ensue should centre on adequate pandemic preparedness and capacitation of HCPs.

16.
Front Public Health ; 10: 936486, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080284

ABSTRACT

Aim: We examined the anxiety levels and coping strategies among staff and students of a tertiary educational institution during the COVID-19 pandemic and determined the association between anxiety level and coping strategies. Method: Through an online survey, we used Coronavirus Anxiety Scale (CAS) to measure the level of anxiety associated with the COVID-19 crisis and Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced (COPE) to assess the coping responses adopted to handle stressful life events. Coping strategies were classified as adaptive and maladaptive, for which the aggregate sores were calculated. Multiple linear regression was used to determine the predictors of anxiety adjusted for potentially confounding variables. Results from 434 participants were available for analysis. Results: The mean score (SD) of the CAS was 1.1 (1.8). The mean scores of adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies were 35.69 and 19.28, respectively. Multiple linear regression revealed that maladaptive coping [Adjusted B coefficient = 4.106, p-value < 0.001] and presence of comorbidities [Adjusted B coefficient = 1.376, p-value = 0.025] significantly predicted anxiety. Conclusion: Maladaptive coping and presence of comorbidities were the predictors of coronavirus anxiety. The apparent lack of anxiety in relation to COVID-19 and movement restriction is reflective of the reported high level of satisfaction with the support and services provided during the COVID-19 outbreak in Malaysia. Adaptive coping strategies were adopted more frequently than maladaptive. Nevertheless, public education on positive coping strategies and anxiety management may be still be relevant to provide mental health support to address the needs of the general population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Malaysia/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Students/psychology
17.
Autism ; : 13623613221119749, 2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079320

ABSTRACT

LAY ABSTRACT: More and more research shows us that autistic individuals are at risk of experiencing mental health problems in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, little is known about why this is the case. At two timepoints during the pandemic, we asked 149 autistic and 147 non-autistic adults about feelings of anxiety, depression, and stress, and about characteristics that may explain why some (autistic) people have a larger chance of developing anxiety and depression during this pandemic. In our study, autistic adults experienced more anxiety and depression than non-autistic adults. Across autistic and non-autistic individuals, the people who experienced more stress at timepoint 1 experienced more anxiety and depression 4 months later. This was especially the case for those individuals who use maladaptive coping styles, such as denial or venting, and for those who have difficulties dealing with uncertain situations. Our findings show the burden of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of autistic adults. Interventions to support autistic adults during and after the pandemic are needed, and they may want to focus on the negative impact of stress and teach autistic (and non-autistic) adults more adaptive ways to cope with stressful circumstances.

18.
Psychol Psychother ; 2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2078641

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Global pandemics, such as the current COVID-19 pandemic, are predicted to increase in prevalence in the future. Transmission suppression techniques such as social distancing and stay-at-home restrictions have introduced an abundance of additional stressors while simultaneously reducing our capacity to cope with stress, thus increasing the collective burden of the pandemic. Numerous psychosocial factors have been identified to protect against distress in difficult circumstances. However, it is unknown whether these factors will continue to be protective in the pandemic context. DESIGN: The aim of the current study was to determine whether locus of control (LOC), coping style or self-compassion were debilitating or protective factors towards psychological well-being (depression, anxiety, stress and positive and negative affect) during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: In the current study, Australian adults (N = 176) completed a longitudinal online survey (two time points, 2 weeks apart) incorporating measures of demographics, locus of control, coping, self-compassion (measured at T1), depression, anxiety, stress and positive and negative affect (measured at T1 and T2) throughout June-August 2020, during the height of lockdown in Australia. RESULTS: Multiple regression analyses suggested that avoidant coping was predictive of increases in stress and negative affect across time points. Additionally, self-compassion was predictive of increased positive affect across time points. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the pandemic context represents a unique stressor, demanding a distinctive set of strategies and psychosocial characteristics to cope. Interventions targeted at reducing avoidant coping behaviours and promoting self-compassion may contribute to improvements in psychological well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic as well as future pandemics.

19.
J Nurs Manag ; 2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2078581

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aimed to explore primary health care nurses' coping strategies and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced (COPE) scale. BACKGROUND: Primary health care nurses are experiencing significant COVID-19-related psychological impacts. Beyond understanding the impacts, there is a need to explore coping strategies. METHODS: This online cross-sectional survey was completed by 359 Australian primary health care nurses between October and December 2020. RESULTS: Factor analysis revealed seven factors (support, disengagement and venting, humour, positive reframing, acceptance, substance use and spiritual/religious beliefs) (Cronbach's alpha > .69). There was an association between age, years of nursing and years of primary health care nursing and the factors of 'support', 'disengagement and venting' and 'positive reframing'. Years of experience were also associated with the factor 'humour'. Urban respondents had higher scores for the 'support' factor. CONCLUSIONS: The Brief COPE scale is a valid and reliable tool for assessing primary health care nurses' coping. As demographic characteristics impact the coping strategies that nurses use, supports need to be tailored to optimize their impact. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Nurse managers need to consider the workforce demographics when designing and implementing support strategies. The Brief COPE can identify current coping strategies and inform interventions to build coping capacity.

20.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 83(12-B):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2073739

ABSTRACT

In the Spring of 2020, the novel Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) was officially declared a global pandemic which prompted an unprecedented number of changes to societal functioning. Amongst those who experienced signific life alterations were that of collegiate athletes within the United States. The following two studies provide an in-depth examination of athlete experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. Study 1 investigates the relationship between athletes' perceptions of their team motivational climate with their perceived support from coaches and teammates as well as their optimistic thoughts during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results revealed significant and positive associations between a caring and task-involving (CTI) team climate with athletes' perceptions of support from coaches and teammates as well as their optimistic thoughts during the COVID-19 pandemic, while an ego-involving (EI) team climate was significantly and negatively associated with perceptions of support from coaches and teammates as well as optimistic thoughts during the COVID-19 pandemic. Further, the final mediation model suggests that perceived support from coaches and teammates act as an indirect effect between perceptions of a CTI climate and athletes' optimistic thoughts during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results also suggest athletes' gender may influence outcomes, with men athletes reporting significantly more optimistic thoughts during the COVID-19 pandemic than women athletes. Further, results revealed a significant difference between women and men in the relationships between perceptions of a CTI climate with EI climate and EI climate with support from teammates. Study 2 uses the findings of Study 1 to provide applicable strategies coaches and administrators can use to create a CTI climate for their athletes during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. Specifically, four recommendations are suggested including: support athletes in sport and life;make athletes' health a priority;sustain motivation and encourage optimism;and help teammates stay connected to each other. Each recommendation is accompanied with specific strategies coaches can use to support the recommendation. The goal of the combined studies is to provide empirical evidence of the impact a CTI climate can have during high-stress times, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as key information on how coaches can help create a CTI climate for their teams to help athletes cope with such stress. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

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