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1.
J Pers Med ; 12(7)2022 Jul 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1938882

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Asthma, along with inhaled steroids, was initially considered a risk factor for worse clinical outcomes in COVID-19. This was related to the higher morbidity observed in asthma patients during previous viral outbreaks. This retrospective study aimed at evaluating the prevalence of asthma among patients admitted due to SARS-CoV-2 infection as well as the impact of inhaled therapies on their outcomes. Furthermore, a comparison between patients with asthma, COPD and the general population was made. Methods: All COVID-19 inpatients were recruited between February and July 2020 from four large hospitals in Northwest Italy. Data concerning medical history, the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and the hospital stay, including length, drugs and COVID-19 complications (respiratory failure, lung involvement, and the need for respiratory support) were collected, as well as the type of discharge. Results: patients with asthma required high-flow oxygen therapy (33.3 vs. 14.3%, p = 0.001) and invasive mechanical ventilation (17.9 vs. 9.5%, p = 0.048) more frequently when compared to the general population, but no other difference was observed. Moreover, asthma patients were generally younger than patients with COPD (59.2 vs. 76.8 years, p < 0.001), they showed both a lower mortality rate (15.4 vs. 39.4%, p < 0.001) and a lower CCI (3.4 vs. 6.2, p < 0.001). Patients with asthma in regular therapy with ICS at home had significantly shorter hospital stay compared to those with no treatments (25.2 vs. 11.3 days, p = 0.024). Discussion: Our study showed that asthma is not associated with worse outcomes of COVID-19, despite the higher need for respiratory support compared with the general population, while the use of ICS allowed for a shorter hospital stay. In addition, the comparison of asthma with COPD patients confirmed the greater frailty of the latter, according to their multiple comorbidities.

2.
Exp Dermatol ; 31(7): 1109-1115, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1868642

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 morbidity and mortality are driven by poor immune regulation. Narrowband ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) phototherapy is standard of care in a number of immune-dysregulated diseases. To assess the efficacy of NB-UVB phototherapy for improving COVID-19 outcomes in high-risk, hospitalized, we developed the Adaptive Photo-Protection Trial. This is a multi-center, prospective, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. The pilot phase results are reported here. Consecutive patients admitted with a positive COVID-19 PCR were screened for eligibility. Enrolled subjects were computer randomized 1:1 to NB-UVB or placebo phototherapy. Subjects were treated daily with escalating doses on 27% of their body surface area for up to 8 consecutive days. Primary outcomes were safety and efficacy, defined as persistent or painful erythema and 28-day mortality. Comparisons were made via non-parametric exact tests. Patients in treatment (n = 15) and placebo (n = 15) arms had similar demographics. No adverse events occurred. Twenty eight-day mortality was 13.3% in treatment vs. 33.3% in placebo arms (p = 0.39). NB-UVB phototherapy in hospitalized COVID-19 patients was safe. Decreased mortality was observed in treated patients but this was statistically non-significant. Given its low-cost, scalability, and adjunctive nature, NB-UVB has the potential to improve COVID-19 outcomes. Continuation of this trial is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ultraviolet Therapy , COVID-19/radiotherapy , Humans , Phototherapy , Prospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
3.
Brain Behav Immun ; 103: 154-162, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797147

ABSTRACT

Vaccination has proven effective against infection with SARS-CoV-2, as well as death and hospitalisation following COVID-19 illness. However, little is known about the effect of vaccination on other acute and post-acute outcomes of COVID-19. Data were obtained from the TriNetX electronic health records network (over 81 million patients mostly in the USA). Using a retrospective cohort study and time-to-event analysis, we compared the incidences of COVID-19 outcomes between individuals who received a COVID-19 vaccine (approved for use in the USA) at least 2 weeks before SARS-CoV-2 infection and propensity score-matched individuals unvaccinated for COVID-19 but who had received an influenza vaccine. Outcomes were ICD-10 codes representing documented COVID-19 sequelae in the 6 months after a confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection (recorded between January 1 and August 31, 2021, i.e. before the emergence of the Omicron variant). Associations with the number of vaccine doses (1 vs. 2) and age (<60 vs. ≥ 60 years-old) were assessed. Among 10,024 vaccinated individuals with SARS-CoV-2 infection, 9479 were matched to unvaccinated controls. Receiving at least one COVID-19 vaccine dose was associated with a significantly lower risk of respiratory failure, ICU admission, intubation/ventilation, hypoxaemia, oxygen requirement, hypercoagulopathy/venous thromboembolism, seizures, psychotic disorder, and hair loss (each as composite endpoints with death to account for competing risks; HR 0.70-0.83, Bonferroni-corrected p < 0.05), but not other outcomes, including long-COVID features, renal disease, mood, anxiety, and sleep disorders. Receiving 2 vaccine doses was associated with lower risks for most outcomes. Associations between prior vaccination and outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection were marked in those <60 years-old, whereas no robust associations were observed in those ≥60 years-old. In summary, COVID-19 vaccination is associated with lower risk of several, but not all, COVID-19 sequelae in those with breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 infection. The findings may inform service planning, contribute to forecasting public health impacts of vaccination programmes, and highlight the need to identify additional interventions for COVID-19 sequelae.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Vaccines , Disease Progression , Humans , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
4.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses ; 16(4): 680-689, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764954

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We sought to assess whether persistent COVID-19 symptoms beyond 6 months (Long-COVID) among patients with mild COVID-19 is associated with poorer health status, quality of life, and psychological distress. METHODS: This was a multicenter prospective cohort study that included adult outpatients with acute COVID-19 from eight sites during 2-week sampling periods from April 1 and July 28, 2020. Participants were contacted 6-11 months after their first positive SARS-CoV-2 to complete a survey, which collected information on the severity of eight COVID-19 symptoms using a 4-point scale ranging from 0 (not present) to 3 (severe) at 1 month before COVID-19 (pre-illness) and at follow-up; the difference for each was calculated as an attributable persistent symptom severity score. A total attributable persistent COVID-19 symptom burden score was calculated by summing the attributable persistent severity scores for all eight symptoms. Outcomes measured at long-term follow-up comprised overall health status (EuroQol visual analogue scale), quality of life (EQ-5D-5L), and psychological distress (Patient Health Questionnaire-4). The association between the total attributable persistent COVID-19 burden score and each outcome was analyzed using multivariable proportional odds regression. RESULTS: Of the 2092 outpatients with COVID-19, 436 (21%) responded to the survey. The median (IQR) attributable persistent COVID-19 symptom burden score was 2 (0, 4); higher scores were associated with lower overall health status (aOR 0.63; 95% CI: 0.57-0.69), lower quality of life (aOR: 0.65; 95%CI: 0.59-0.72), and higher psychological distress (aOR: 1.40; 95%CI, 1.28-1.54) after adjusting for age, race, ethnicity, education, and income. CONCLUSIONS: In participants with mild acute COVID-19, the burden of persistent symptoms was significantly associated with poorer long-term health status, poorer quality of life, and psychological distress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Status , Humans , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Inflamm Bowel Dis ; 2022 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758740

ABSTRACT

This brief report investigated the impact of clinical, biochemical, and endoscopic activity of IBD on the severity and long-term outcomes of COVID-19 in a prospective population-based cohort. The study did not identify any association between IBD activity and COVID-19 outcomes.

6.
Int J Popul Data Sci ; 5(4): 1697, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1754159

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19 risk prediction algorithms can be used to identify at-risk individuals from short-term serious adverse COVID-19 outcomes such as hospitalisation and death. It is important to validate these algorithms in different and diverse populations to help guide risk management decisions and target vaccination and treatment programs to the most vulnerable individuals in society. Objectives: To validate externally the QCOVID risk prediction algorithm that predicts mortality outcomes from COVID-19 in the adult population of Wales, UK. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using routinely collected individual-level data held in the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) Databank. The cohort included individuals aged between 19 and 100 years, living in Wales on 24th January 2020, registered with a SAIL-providing general practice, and followed-up to death or study end (28th July 2020). Demographic, primary and secondary healthcare, and dispensing data were used to derive all the predictor variables used to develop the published QCOVID algorithm. Mortality data were used to define time to confirmed or suspected COVID-19 death. Performance metrics, including R2 values (explained variation), Brier scores, and measures of discrimination and calibration were calculated for two periods (24th January-30th April 2020 and 1st May-28th July 2020) to assess algorithm performance. Results: 1,956,760 individuals were included. 1,192 (0.06%) and 610 (0.03%) COVID-19 deaths occurred in the first and second time periods, respectively. The algorithms fitted the Welsh data and population well, explaining 68.8% (95% CI: 66.9-70.4) of the variation in time to death, Harrell's C statistic: 0.929 (95% CI: 0.921-0.937) and D statistic: 3.036 (95% CI: 2.913-3.159) for males in the first period. Similar results were found for females and in the second time period for both sexes. Conclusions: The QCOVID algorithm developed in England can be used for public health risk management for the adult Welsh population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Algorithms , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Wales/epidemiology , Young Adult
7.
Clin Exp Nephrol ; 26(5): 445-452, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712257

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: While there is evidence of the presence of the coronavirus in the kidneys and resultant acute kidney injury (AKI), information on the effect of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on COVID-19 outcomes and its pathogenesis is currently lacking. METHODS: This retrospective, observational study evaluated the outcomes of all consecutive patients hospitalized during COVID-19 outbreaks in Meir Medical Center. Serum creatinine level was assessed before hospitalization ("baseline serum creatinine") and at admission, as well as minimum and maximum serum creatinine levels during hospitalization. RESULTS: Among 658 patients, 152 had eGFR < 60 ml/min (termed the CKD group), 506 patients served as controls. Patients in the CKD group were older, with higher prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Disease severity and clinical presentation of CKD group were comparable to that of control group. Odds ratio for AKI was 5.8 (95%CI 3.8-8.7; p < 0.001) in CKD group vs. control group and 3.4 (95%CI 1.1-10.8) for renal replacement therapy (p < 0.026). Among the CKD group, 32.2% died after COVID-19 infection versus 14.8% of the controls (p < 0.001). Mortality increased as CKD stage increased (14.8% in controls, 29.6% in CKD stage 3, and 39.3% in CKD stages 4 and 5, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Despite comparable disease severity at presentation, patients with CKD had significantly more AKI events and required more renal replacement therapy during hospitalization than control patients did. Mortality increased as CKD stage increased.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Creatinine , Female , Humans , Kidney , Male , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
8.
Genet Epidemiol ; 46(3-4): 159-169, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699896

ABSTRACT

Mendelian randomization (MR) is a statistical method exploiting genetic variants as instrumental variables to estimate the causal effect of modifiable risk factors on an outcome of interest. Despite wide uses of various popular two-sample MR methods based on genome-wide association study summary level data, however, those methods could suffer from potential power loss or/and biased inference when the chosen genetic variants are in linkage disequilibrium (LD), and also have relatively large direct effects on the outcome whose distribution might be heavy-tailed which is commonly referred to as the idiosyncratic pleiotropy phenomenon. To resolve those two issues, we propose a novel Robust Bayesian Mendelian Randomization (RBMR) model that uses the more robust multivariate generalized t $t$ -distribution to model such direct effects in a probabilistic model framework which can also incorporate the LD structure explicitly. The generalized t $t$ -distribution can be represented as a Gaussian scaled mixture so that our model parameters can be estimated by the expectation maximization (EM)-type algorithms. We compute the standard errors by calibrating the evidence lower bound using the likelihood ratio test. Through extensive simulation studies, we show that our RBMR has robust performance compared with other competing methods. We further apply our RBMR method to two benchmark data sets and find that RBMR has smaller bias and standard errors. Using our proposed RBMR method, we find that coronary artery disease is associated with increased risk of critically ill coronavirus disease 2019. We also develop a user-friendly R package RBMR (https://github.com/AnqiWang2021/RBMR) for public use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Bayes Theorem , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Pleiotropy , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Linkage Disequilibrium , Mendelian Randomization Analysis/methods , Models, Genetic
9.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 781968, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686454

ABSTRACT

Background: The upper respiratory tract (URT) is the portal of entry of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and SARS-CoV-2 likely interacts with the URT microbiome. However, understanding of the associations between the URT microbiome and the severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is still limited. Objective: Our primary objective was to identify URT microbiome signature/s that consistently changed over a spectrum of COVID-19 severity. Methods: Using data from 103 adult participants from two cities in the United States, we compared the bacterial load and the URT microbiome between five groups: 20 asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2-negative participants, 27 participants with mild COVID-19, 28 participants with moderate COVID-19, 15 hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19, and 13 hospitalized patients in the ICU with very severe COVID-19. Results: URT bacterial load, bacterial richness, and within-group microbiome composition dissimilarity consistently increased as COVID-19 severity increased, while the relative abundance of an amplicon sequence variant (ASV), Corynebacterium_unclassified.ASV0002, consistently decreased as COVID-19 severity increased. Conclusions: We observed that the URT microbiome composition significantly changed as COVID-19 severity increased. The URT microbiome could potentially predict which patients may be more likely to progress to severe disease or be modified to decrease severity. However, further research in additional longitudinal cohorts is needed to better understand how the microbiome affects COVID-19 severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Microbiota , Adult , Bacteria , Humans , Respiratory System , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Tumori ; : 3008916211073771, 2022 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673723

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This study assesses the risk of infection and clinical outcomes in a large consecutive population of cancer and non-cancer patients tested for SARS-CoV-2 status. METHODS: Study patients underwent SARS-CoV-2 molecular-testing between 22 February 2020 and 31 July 2020, and were found infected (CoV2+ve) or uninfected. History of malignancy was obtained from regional population-based cancer registries. Cancer-patients were distinguished by time between cancer diagnosis and SARS-CoV-2 testing (<12/⩾12 months). Comorbidities, hospitalization, and death at 15 September 2020 were retrieved from regional population-based databases. The impact of cancer history on SARS-CoV-2 infection and clinical outcomes was calculated by fitting a multivariable logistic regression model, adjusting for sex, age, and comorbidities. RESULTS: Among 552,362 individuals tested for SARS-CoV-2, 55,206 (10.0%) were cancer-patients and 22,564 (4.1%) tested CoV2+ve. Irrespective of time since cancer diagnosis, SARS-CoV-2 infection was significantly lower among cancer patients (1,787; 3.2%) than non-cancer individuals (20,777; 4.2% - Odds Ratio (OR)=0.60; 0.57-0.63). CoV2+ve cancer-patients were older than non-cancer individuals (median age: 77 versus 57 years; p<0.0001), were more frequently men and with comorbidities. Hospitalizations (39.9% versus 22.5%; OR=1.61; 1.44-1.80) and deaths (24.3% versus 9.7%; OR=1.51; 1.32-1.72) were more frequent in cancer-patients. CoV2+ve cancer-patients were at higher risk of death (lung OR=2.90; 1.58-5.24, blood OR=2.73; 1.88-3.93, breast OR=1.77; 1.32-2.35). CONCLUSIONS: The risks of hospitalization and death are significantly higher in CoV2+ve individuals with past or present cancer (particularly malignancies of the lung, hematologic or breast) than in those with no history of cancer.

11.
Pulmonologiya ; 31(5):599-612, 2021.
Article in Russian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1631173

ABSTRACT

The post-COVID symptom complex is wide enough and requires special vigilance during clinical examination of patients after the novel coronavirus infection. The aim of the Multidisciplinary Expert Board study was to develop a standardized questionnaire for initial self-assessment by patients who had had COVID-19 before the expanded medical check-up. Methods. The existing validated international and national questionnaires and scales were analyzed to assess their relevance, convenience, and ease of filling out. Results of the analysis were used to set up a screening for post-COVID symptoms. Results. The work of the Multidisciplinary Expert Board in June-August 2021 resulted in a new screening questionnaire for the initial assessment of the health status of patients who have COVID-19. The questionnaire is intended for self-filling before the further clinical examination. Conclusion. A new standardized patient questionnaire to screen for post-COVID symptoms may significantly optimize the doctor’s working time, increase the efficiency of diagnosis, improve the principles of selection and formation of risk groups of patients during an expanded medical check-up. © 2021 Medical Education. All rights reserved.

12.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(1): 133-135, 2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621564

ABSTRACT

Calls for adherence to evidence-based medicine have emerged during the initial wave of the COVID-19 pandemic but reports of outcomes are lacking. This retrospective study of an institutional cohort including 135 patients with confirmed COVID-19 demonstrates positive outcomes when organizational standards of care consist of evidence-based supportive therapies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Front Public Health ; 9: 590458, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591317

ABSTRACT

Background: Low-income earners are particularly vulnerable to mental health, consequence of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown restrictions, due to a temporary or permanent loss of income and livelihood, coupled with government-enforced measures of social distancing. This study evaluates the mental health status among low-income earners in southwestern Uganda during the first total COVID-19 lockdown in Uganda. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was undertaken amongst earners whose income falls below the poverty threshold. Two hundred and fifty-three (n = 253) male and female low-income earners between the ages of 18 and 60 years of age were recruited to the study. Modified generalized anxiety disorder (GAD-7), Spielberger's State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) tools as appropriate were used to assess anxiety, anger, and depression respectively among our respondents. Results: Severe anxiety (68.8%) followed by moderate depression (60.5%) and moderate anger (56.9%) were the most common mental health challenges experienced by low-income earners in Bushenyi district. Awareness of mental healthcare increased with the age of respondents in both males and females. A linear relationship was observed with age and depression (r = 0.154, P = 0.014) while positive correlations were observed between anxiety and anger (r = 0.254, P < 0.001); anxiety and depression (r = 0.153, P = 0.015) and anger and depression (r = 0.153, P = 0.015). Conclusion: The study shows the importance of mental health awareness in low resource settings during the current COVID-19 pandemic. Females were identified as persons at risk to mental depression, while anger was highest amongst young males.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Anger , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Poverty , SARS-CoV-2 , Uganda/epidemiology , Young Adult
14.
Front Public Health ; 9: 779501, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528876

ABSTRACT

This paper examines the effects of stringency measures (provided by the Oxford Coronavirus Government Response Tracker) and total time spent away from home (provided by the Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports) on the COVID-19 outcomes (measured by total COVID-19 cases and total deaths related to the COVID-19) in the United States. The paper focuses on the daily data from March 11, 2020 to August 13, 2021. The ordinary least squares and the machine learning estimators show that stringency measures are negatively related to the COVID-19 outcomes. A higher time spent away from home is positively associated with the COVID-19 outcomes. The paper also discusses the potential economic implications for the United States.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Government , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Mobility , United States
15.
Ther Adv Med Oncol ; 13: 17588359211053416, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511684

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cancer patients are at higher risk of COVID-19 complications and mortality than the rest of the population. Breast cancer patients seem to have better prognosis when infected by SARS-CoV-2 than other cancer patients. METHODS: We report a subanalysis of the OnCovid study providing more detailed information in the breast cancer population. RESULTS: We included 495 breast cancer patients with a SARS-CoV-2 infection. Mean age was 62.6 years; 31.5% presented more than one comorbidity. The most frequent breast cancer subtype was luminal-like (n = 245, 49.5%) and 177 (35.8%) had metastatic disease. A total of 332 (67.1%) patients were receiving active treatment, with radical intent in 232 (47.6%) of them. Hospitalization rate was 58.2% and all-cause mortality rate was 20.3%. One hundred twenty-nine (26.1%) patients developed one COVID-19 complication, being acute respiratory failure the most common (n = 74, 15.0%). In the multivariable analysis, age older than 70 years, presence of COVID-19 complications, and metastatic disease were factors correlated with worse outcomes, while ongoing anticancer therapy at time of COVID-19 diagnosis appeared to be a protective factor. No particular oncological treatment was related to higher risk of complications. In the context of SARS-CoV-2 infection, 73 (18.3%) patients had some kind of modification on their oncologic treatment. At the first oncological reassessment (median time: 46.9 days ± 36.7), 255 (51.6%) patients reported to be fully recovered from the infection. There were 39 patients (7.9%) with long-term SARS-CoV-2-related complications. CONCLUSION: In the context of COVID-19, our data confirm that breast cancer patients appear to have lower complications and mortality rate than expected in other cancer populations. Most breast cancer patients can be safely treated for their neoplasm during SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Oncological treatment has no impact on the risk of SARS-CoV-2 complications, and, especially in the curative setting, the treatment should be modified as little as possible.

16.
J Crohns Colitis ; 2021 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510961

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The health consequences of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) remain largely unknown. We aimed to investigate outcomes and long-term effects of COVID-19 in patients with UC or CD. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, population-based study covering all Danish patients with CD or UC and confirmed COVID-19 between January 28th, 2020 and April 1st, 2021, through medical records and questionnaires. RESULTS: All 319 patients with UC and 197 patients with CD who developed COVID-19 in Denmark were included in this study and compared with the Danish background population with COVID-19 (N=230,087). A significantly higher risk of COVID-19-related hospitalization was observed among patients with UC (N=46(14.4%), RR=2.49 (95%CI 1.91-3.26)) and CD (N=24(12.2%), RR=2.11 (95%CI 1.45-3.07)) as compared with the background population (N=13,306 (5.8%)). A similar pattern was observed for admission to intensive care (UC: N=8(2.51%), RR=27.88 (95%CI 13.88-56.00); CD: N=3 (1.52%), RR=16.92 (95%CI 5.46-52.46)). After a median of 5.1 months (IQR 4.5-7.9), 58 (42.3%) and 39 (45.9%) patients with UC and CD, reported persisting symptoms which were independently associated with discontinuation of immunosuppressive therapies during COVID-19 (OR=1.50 (95%CI 1.07-10.22), p=0.01) and severe COVID-19 (OR=2.76 (95%CI 1.05-3.90), p=0.04), but not with age nor presence of comorbidities. CONCLUSION: In this population-based study of 516 patients with IBD and COVID-19, 13.6% needed hospitalization and 2.1% required intensive care. Furthermore, sequelae were frequent affecting 43.7% of COVID-19 infected. These findings might have implications for planning the healthcare of patients in the post-COVID-19 era.

18.
Chest ; 160(1): 74-84, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258346

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severity of illness in COVID-19 is consistently lower in women. A focus on sex as a biological factor may suggest a potential therapeutic intervention for this disease. We assessed whether adding progesterone to standard of care (SOC) would improve clinical outcomes of hospitalized men with moderate to severe COVID-19. RESEARCH QUESTION: Does short-term subcutaneous administration of progesterone safely improve clinical outcome in hypoxemic men hospitalized with COVID-19? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a pilot, randomized, open-label, controlled trial of subcutaneous progesterone in men hospitalized with confirmed moderate to severe COVID-19. Patients were randomly assigned to receive SOC plus progesterone (100 mg subcutaneously twice daily for up to 5 days) or SOC alone. In addition to assessment of safety, the primary outcome was change in clinical status on day 7. Length of hospital stay and number of days on supplemental oxygen were key secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Forty-two patients were enrolled from April 2020 to August 2020; 22 were randomized to the control group and 20 to the progesterone group. Two patients from the progesterone group withdrew from the study before receiving progesterone. There was a 1.5-point overall improvement in median clinical status score on a seven-point ordinal scale from baseline to day 7 in patients in the progesterone group as compared with control subjects (95% CI, 0.0-2.0; P = .024). There were no serious adverse events attributable to progesterone. Patients treated with progesterone required three fewer days of supplemental oxygen (median, 4.5 vs 7.5 days) and were hospitalized for 2.5 fewer days (median, 7.0 vs 9.5 days) as compared with control subjects. INTERPRETATION: Progesterone at a dose of 100 mg, twice daily by subcutaneous injection in addition to SOC, may represent a safe and effective approach for treatment in hypoxemic men with moderate to severe COVID-19. TRIAL REGISTRY: ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT04365127; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Progesterone/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Protocols/standards , Drug Monitoring , Humans , Hypoxia/diagnosis , Hypoxia/etiology , Injections, Subcutaneous , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Pilot Projects , Progestins/administration & dosage , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
19.
Front Cardiovasc Med ; 8: 633878, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247846

ABSTRACT

Objective: Altered coagulation parameters in COVID-19 patients is associated with a poor prognosis. We tested whether COVID-19 patients on chronic oral anticoagulants (cOACs) for thromboembolism prophylaxis could receive protection from developing more severe phenotypes of the disease. Approach and Results: We searched the database of the SARS-RAS study (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT04331574), a cross-sectional observational multicenter nationwide survey in Italy designed by the Italian Society of Hypertension. The database counts 2,377 charts of Italian COVID-19 patients in 26 hospitals. We calculated the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), which is associated with death in COVID-19 patients. In our population (n = 2,377, age 68.2 ± 0.4 years, CCI: 3.04 ± 0.04), we confirm that CCI is associated with increased mortality [OR: 1.756 (1.628-1.894)], admission to intensive care units [ICU; OR: 1.074 (1.017-1.134)], and combined hard events [CHE; OR: 1.277 (1.215-1.342)]. One hundred twenty-five patients were on cOACs (age: 79.3 ± 0.9 years, CCI: 4.35 ± 0.13); despite the higher CCI, cOACs patients presented with a lower risk of admissions to the ICU [OR 0.469 (0.250-0.880)] but not of death [OR: 1.306 (0.78-2.188)] or CHE [OR: 0.843 (0.541-1.312)]. In multivariable logistic regression, cOACs confirmed their protective effect on ICU admission and CHE. The CCI remains the most important risk factor for ICU admission, death, and CHE. Conclusions: Our data support a mechanism for the continuation of cOAC therapy after hospital admission for those patients who are on chronic treatment. Our preliminary results suggest the prophylactic use of direct cOACs in patients with elevated CCI score at the time of the COVID-19 pandemic even in absence of other risks of thromboembolism.

20.
Clin Infect Dis ; 72(10): e655-e658, 2021 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232193

ABSTRACT

We profiled cases with nonrespiratory symptoms (NRS) and asymptomatic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infections assessed within Mexico City's Epidemiological Surveillance System. Initially asymptomatic or NRS cases have decreased risk of adverse outcomes compared with cases with respiratory symptoms. Comorbidity and age influence symptom development in initially asymptomatic cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Humans , Mexico/epidemiology
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