Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 45
Filter
1.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1284, 2022 07 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916942

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emerging international evidence indicates the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated socioeconomic and health challenges faced by transgender (trans) and non-binary populations globally. This qualitative study is among the first to characterize impacts of the pandemic on these groups in Canada. METHODS: Drawing on data from the Trans PULSE Canada survey (N = 820), we used thematic analysis to examine the free-form responses of 697 participants to one open-ended question on impacts of the pandemic. We first organized responses into descriptive themes, and then used this preliminary analytical process to construct more refined, higher order themes that provided a rich account of the pandemic's impacts. RESULTS: Our results are organized into five themes that highlight the pandemic's impacts on trans and non-binary populations in Canada. These include: (1) reduced access to both gender-affirming and other healthcare, (2) heightened financial, employment, and housing precarity, (3) strained social networks in an era of physical distancing and virtual communication, (4) an intensification of safety concerns, and (5) changes in experiences of gender affirmation. CONCLUSION: Our findings highlight the pandemic's systemic impacts on the lives of trans and non-binary people in domains such as healthcare, employment, and housing, and on the social networks of these groups, many of which reflect an exacerbation of pre-existing inequities. Based on our analysis, we recommend that public health researchers, policymakers, and practitioners attend to the structural impacts of the pandemic on these groups as primary sites of inquiry and intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Transgender Persons , Transsexualism , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics
2.
Tourism and Hospitality Management-Croatia ; 28(1):61-81, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1870207

ABSTRACT

Purpose - To better understand the impact of COVID -19 on the tourism sector, with a focus on the hospitality industry, and how these changes will affect the sector and business responsiveness. Design - This is research focusing on the COVID-19 impacts on the hospitality sector in Portugal. The study reports in detail how a group of experts perceived this critical situation caused by the pandemic. Methodology - For data collection, a focus group was conducted with six experts in the field. A thematic analysis was conducted to interpret the data and NVivo software was used to organise and define the themes. Findings - Experts emphasised the massive collective dismissals in large hotel chains, the possible loss of 50 million jobs in the tourism sector, and the negative impact on the entire value chain. The low occupancy rate had a negative financial impact, as total revenues in the sector plummeted by more than 70% compared to the previous year. This pandemic required significant adjustments from operations to ensure safe operations. Participants not only stressed the importance of motivating and bringing teams together, but also described strategies to increase employee engagement. Another area of growth during the pandemic was food delivery platforms. Originality of the research - This is the first time research describing economic, financial, organizational, operational, and technological impact of COVID-19 on the hospitality industry. Hopefully these study results will help hotel and restaurant managers better plan their strategy following this pandemic.

3.
Farmers Weekly ; 2022(Jan 28):20-20, 2022.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1824189
4.
Engineering News ; 42(2), 2022.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1823855
5.
Farmers Weekly ; 2022(Jan 21):34-37, 2022.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1823769
6.
Farmers Weekly ; 2022(Jan 21):19-19, 2022.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1823606
7.
Farmers Weekly ; 2022(Jan 21):26-27, 2022.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1823605
8.
International Water Power and Dam Construction ; 2022(January), 2022.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1823561

ABSTRACT

AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT : Civil engineering works at the 420MW Nachtigal project are over halfway complete, Cameroon's Minister of Water and Energy, Gaston Eloundou Essomba, updated during a recent site visit. The Minister told reporters that the 52% of the civil work has been completed, with 48.2% of first electromechanical lot and 99.8% of the transmission line also complete. The project was initially expected to be complete at the end of 2023, but due to delays caused by the coronavirus pandemic, Nachtigal Hydro Power Company (NHPC) has now been tasked with starting operations of the first machine in July 2023, with final commissioning in July 2024

9.
Mining News ; 2022(January), 2022.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1823548

ABSTRACT

AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT : The World Gold Council's latest Gold Demand Trends Report revealed that annual demand (excluding OTC markets) has recovered many of the Covid-induced losses from 2020 to reach 4 021t for the full year in 2021.[1] Demand for gold reached 1 147t in Q4 2021, its highest quarterly level since Q2 2019 and an increase of almost 50% year-on-year, according to the World Gold Council. Gold bar and coin demand rose 31% to an 8-year high of 1 180t as retail investors sought a safe haven against the backdrop of rising inflation and ongoing economic uncertainty caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Meanwhile, the World Gold Council's data series reported outflows of 173t in 2021 from gold-backed ETFs as some more tactical investors reduced hedges early in the year amid Covid vaccine rollouts, while rising interest rates made holding gold more expensive

10.
J Adolesc Health ; 71(1): 30-38, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1821322

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This analysis aimed to investigate gender differences in adolescents' concerns and the health implications of COVID-19. METHODS: We used two rounds of the Global Early Adolescent Study (GEAS) collected in Shanghai in 2018 and 2020. We analyzed data from 621 adolescents, comparing boys' and girls' concerns about COVID-19 and examining trends in general health and mental health by sex between the pre-COVID-19 and COVID-19 periods. Changes in health indicators over time were assessed using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. RESULTS: Adolescent girls reported more health concerns (52.0% vs. 42.7%) and educational concerns (61.0% vs. 46.3%) than boys, whereas boys expressed more worries about the economic consequences of COVID-19 (32.9% vs. 25.4%). Changes in health-related outcomes during the pandemic compared to the prepandemic era differed by sex and varied by COVID-related experiences. Boys reported improved overall health (OR: 1.54, 95% CI: 1.00, 2.35) in the COVID-19 period relative to the pre-COVID-19 period. Such improvements were only observed among boys who reported no family economic hardships (OR: 2.10, 95% CI: 1.24, 3.58). We found no significant change for girls (OR: 1.14, 95% CI: 0.83, 1.55), regardless of COVID-19 economic impacts. In contrast, girls reported increased anxiety (OR: 1.63, 95% CI: 1.09, 2.45), especially among those who were concerned about their academic performance (OR: 1.85, 95% CI: 1.16, 2.97). Boys experienced no such increase (OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.55, 1.54), regardless of their education concerns. DISCUSSION: Adolescents' COVID-19 experiences are highly gendered and result in increased health inequalities, with greater mental health implications for girls.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mental Health , Vulnerable Populations
11.
Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration ; : 20, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1799406

ABSTRACT

Purpose Companies' relationship with their customers through e-commerce platforms has increased considerably in the past few years, bringing new challenges concerning service guarantees (SG). This study aims to propose a framework of the relations between customers' expectations on SG, their negative experiences and their attitudes and behavioural intentions towards an e-commerce platform. Design/methodology/approach The research had a qualitative and descriptive approach. Testimonials from clients of an online e-commerce platform were obtained through interviews via videoconference and non-participant observation on a complaints website in Brazil. The testimonies were analysed through content analysis. Findings The customer expectations regarding the SG offered by the e-commerce platform are congruent with the five categories of the theory that support this research. Customer testimonials on the complaints site show that their negative experiences with the e-commerce platform generated negative emotional, cognitive and behavioural responses towards the company. A framework was proposed, including customers' expectations regarding SG, their negative experiences and their repercussions on clients' attitudes and behavioural intentions. Originality/value This article is the only that contemplates customers' expectations about SG in an e-commerce platform, relating them to attitudes and behavioural intentions. Thus, its framework demonstrates the relationships between customer expectations about SGs, their negative experiences and attitudinal and behavioural repercussions. This article brings academic and managerial contributions for companies and managers of e-commerce platforms. It contributes to clients and consumer protection associations by revealing problems they face with SG on e-commerce platforms. This research can be used by those responsible for elaborating laws and public policies to regulate and inspect the relationships between e-commerce platforms and their customers.

12.
47th Annual Conference of the IEEE-Industrial-Electronics-Society (IECON) ; 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1799287

ABSTRACT

Electric Vehicles (EVs) have become prominent on our roadways. They are cost-effective, save our precious time and create a pollution-free environment. High efficiency inductive wireless charging systems for electric vehicles (EVs) have proved convenient and user friendly compared to their wired charging counterparts. Wireless EVs (WEVs) are unusual in most countries due to the associated techno-economic problems. Hence, it becomes essential to study in detail about the same before deploying a WEV charging infrastructure. This paper examines the economic aspects of wireless charging systems (WCS) for EVs. The impacts of the COVID-19 and real-estate availability for constructing and commissioning various (WCS) are discussed. Additionally, the cost involved in converters/ inverters, coils, battery for WCS are enumerated.

13.
Curr Res Environ Sustain ; 4: 100152, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783273

ABSTRACT

Climate smart village approach is identified as an important strategy laid out in the Myanmar Climate Smart Agriculture Strategy (MCSAS, 2016) Four climate smart villages were established in 2017 to facilitate participatory action research to develop the CSV approach as well as to generate evidence of outcomes. The CSV approach is based on the principle of community-directed research process where community-members collaborate with an external researcher to investigate community challenges and their solutions. Like other countries in 2020, the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, Myanmar implemented wide-scale national and local restrictions on mobility that impacted trade and business resulting to an economic slowdown. Rural communities dominated by smallholder agriculture in Myanmar are not spared from the negative impacts of these restrictions. This paper seeks to assess the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic to the 4 climate smart villages in Myanmar by analyzing household survey data (N = 527) collected in 2020 during the height of economic disruptions and comparing these data to the household survey conducted during the pre-pandemic period of 2018. Our analysis indicated that overall, the effect of the pandemic to agriculture production in 2020 production season in the 4 CSVs has been minimal as evidenced by the continued agriculture production at the same levels as the pre-pandemic conditions in 2018. The effects to household food security and diet diversity has been varied. Sakta village in Chin state in the highlands have demonstrated that diversified production systems enable them to achieve food security in the pandemic year of 2020.

14.
4th European International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Operations Management, IEOM 2021 ; : 791-798, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1749714

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 was declared a widespread pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) in early March 2020. It was first discovered in China and quickly spread across the world, prompting world governments to take strict steps to isolate cases and slow the virus's transition rate. Indonesia government is trying to keep growth and welfare impacts from leading to a very severe scenario. This research aims to understand the impact of Covid-19 towards the infrastructure sector in Indonesia and to identify strategies used in infrastructure companies to survive during Covid-19 by empirical study. Covid-19 has negative impacts on revenue and expenses of the top nine infrastructure companies in Indonesia. However, most companies applied defensive strategies as their acts to survive and intensive strategy as their act to retain the source of revenue. © IEOM Society International.

15.
12th International Renewable Energy Congress, IREC 2021 ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1672797

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has been a source of great disruption to governments and people ali over the world. Health care systems have been overwhelmed, already destabilized financial markets further jeopardized, with oil and energy markets plunging into crises and economic activities coming to severe halts. To keep people connected while working from home and upholding life-saving facilities in hospitals and around industrial regimes, reliable affordable electricity is imminent. As an immediate consequence of the pandemic, much pressure has befallen countries with low-energy reserves, where the energy sectors involved had already been staggering and facing major challenges ahead of COVID-19. Jordan's, being of these impacted countries, peak demand on electricity decreased by 17.5% by early April 2020 compared with the mean 2019 levels. Based on the ARMA and ARIMA models obtained, the impact on 2020 electricity demand in Jordan depends on the durations and levels of the confinement/s, with a low estimate of 2.76% if pre pandemic conditions return by mid-September (2020), and a high estimate of 7% if some restrictions remain in effect worldwide until the end of 2020. This article reports the short-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the energy sector in Jordan, with Jordan being a typical example of many such countries worldwide. This will help leverage contingencies and good planning that would help the energy sectors worldwide remain within some sustainable regime/s. © 2021 IEEE.

16.
Farmers Weekly ; 2021(Sep 17):29-29, 2021.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1661493
17.
Engineering News ; 41(29), 2021.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1661372
18.
Engineering News ; 41(31), 2021.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1661325
19.
Engineering News ; 41(36), 2021.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1661264
20.
Engineering News ; 41(36), 2021.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1661242
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL