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1.
Eur J Dent Educ ; 2022 Sep 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088172

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: With the emergence of COVID-19, dental medicine students were faced with a new reality, as a modification of the learning methods in Dentistry colleges happened. The aim of this study was to characterise the possible effects of Covid-19 pandemic in terms of anxiety, depression, and stress among students of dentistry. MATHERIALS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted between October 2020 and May 2021. A total of 1115 participants from a total of approximately 3000 students from the seven university institutions that teach the master's degree in dentistry in Portugal, agreed to participate. An online self-reported questionnaire was applied through Google Forms® platform. The questionnaire was divided in three sections: the students' sociodemographic characterisation, pedagogical aspects, and questions about anxiety, depression, and stress using the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress-21 Scale. RESULTS: Normal levels of anxiety, depression, and stress, were found in 41%, 36.7%, and 22.7% of the participants, respectively. Being female was the most significant and strong predictor of anxiety and stress, and for depression, not feeling fulfilled in the course they were in was the most significant variable. CONCLUSION: The participants presented high values of anxiety, depression, and stress, during the pandemic state. Gender and not feeling fulfilled in the course were important predictors.

2.
Malaysian Journal of Public Health Medicine ; 22(2):87-94, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2046632

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the education system entirely. The teaching and learning process was abruptly moved to a fully online session causing students to be affected especially, new intake students. This study accesses the level of depression, anxiety, and stress during pandemic Covid-19 among the first-year student in Universiti Sains Malaysia and compared the programs in the School of Health Science. A cross-sectional questionnaire was conducted with 178 first-year students aged between 18-29 years old. After providing informed consent, the participants completed a survey on socio-demographic variables along with the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) questionnaire. A one-Way ANOVA test was performed to compare the significant difference in the level of depression, anxiety, and stress between different programs in PPSK. While, the significant difference in the level of depression, anxiety, and stress between students staying on campus and students staying outside campus was compared by using an independent t-Test. The prevalence rates of the extremely severe level of depression, anxiety, and stress of the first-year student during pandemic covid-19 were 14.0%, 32.0%, and 6.7% respectively. However, this study found no significant mean difference in depression, anxiety, and stress between different programs in Universiti Sains Malaysia. Students staying on campus perceived higher extremely severe depression (17.6%) and extremely severe anxiety (41.2%) as compared to students staying outside campus. This study found there is a significant mean difference for anxiety of students staying on campus as compared to students staying outside campus. So, it is recommended for further study to be done to investigate the contributing factors to students' mental health so the university may be handled or avoided. © 2022, Malaysian Journal of Public Health Medicine. All Rights Reserved.

3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043727

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic globally impacted physical, spiritual, and mental health (MH). The consequences significantly affected students' quality of life (QoL) too. This cross-sectional study assessed MH status and its relationship to the QoL of college students in Indonesia. This study collected data (September 2021-April 2022) online using the depression, anxiety, and stress scale-21 (DASS-21) to measure MH and the world health organization quality-of-life scale (WHOQoL-BREF) to measure the QoL. The data were analysed using SPSS with a bivariate and multivariate linear regression test. A total of 606 respondents participated in this study, with the majority being women (81.0%), aged 21-27 years (44.3%), and unmarried (98.5%) respondents. We observed 24.4% (n = 148) moderate depression, 18.3% (n = 111) very severe anxiety, and 21.1% (n = 128) moderate stress status. The QoL measurement determined that a moderate QoL in the physical and environmental health domains (>70%) and poor QoL in the psychological health domain (58.3%) were found. Gender, age, family support, history of COVID-19 diagnosis, family with COVID-19 diagnosis, vaccination status, and physical symptoms are significantly associated with MH status and QoL (p-value < 0.05). This study demonstrated that COVID-19 was negatively related to college students' MH and QoL. Targeted interventions may be needed to ameliorate both MH and QoL.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology , Students/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Anales de Psicologia ; 38(3):448-457, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2025262

ABSTRACT

One of the consequences of pandemic is the increase in the prevalence of mental alterations such as anxiety, depression and stress. Since here, we aimed to determinate through a transversal and observational study prevalence of stress, anxiety and depression within hospitalized patients by COVID-19 as well as their likely association with the emotional impact received by relatives with hospitalized patients by COVID19. Forty-five COVID-19 hospitalized patients with mean age of 54.4 ± 9.6 years and fifty-five relatives with mean age of 43.2 ± 11.8 years answered a questions battery and DASS-21 survey. Our results revealed high prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress assessed by DASS-21 subscales. We also identified risk factors associated with the emotional health such as age (< 50 years: depression OR = 2.99 [1.31, 6.80], p < .05 and anxiety OR = 2.83 [1.15, 6.93], p < .05), by gender (female: anxiety OR = 4.13 [1.57, 10.89], p < .05 and stress OR = 5.38 [2.27, 12.8], p < .05), by group of study (relatives: depression OR = 3.83 [1.63, 8.96];p < .05, anxiety OR = 3.60 [1.46, 8.88];p < .05 and stress OR = 3.30 [1.41, 7.70];p < .05). Additionally, female gender and low socioeconomic status in patients (β = 3.23;1.96) and relatives (β = 1.86;2.31) were associated with higher scores in anxiety (p < .05) and stress (p < .05). We concluded that our sample of COVID-19 patients maintain a high prevalence of mental alterations and age, gender and socioeconomic status modify the magnitude of these disorders. © 2022: Editum. Universidad de Murcia (Spain).

5.
Indian Journal of Psychiatry ; 64, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2002949
6.
Heliyon ; 8(9): e10415, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2004108

ABSTRACT

Background: Covid-19 is an acute respiratory infectious disease caused by novel coronavirus 2019. Many individuals have suffered or are experiencing psychological symptoms due to feelings of isolation, insecurity and instability triggered by Covid-19. This study aimed to explore the perceived psychological distress and associated factors among people infected with Covid-19 in Dhaka and Chittagong cities. Methods: Using the face-to-face interview method, a survey was conducted from 23 April to 22 May 2021 on a questionnaire on depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS-21), socio-demographic, economic and health factors. Among those who had ever been infected with Covid-19, a total of 2092 respondents (1180 from Dhaka and 912 from Chittagong) were randomly selected and interviewed. χ 2 test for independence of attributes was employed to observe the association of various socioeconomic, cultural, demographic and health factors with psychological distress. Moreover, multinomial logistic regression analysis was performed to explore the factors that contributed to psychological distress. Results: Among participants from Dhaka, of three mental health conditions, the prevalence was higher for anxiety (80.0%), followed by stress (64.2%) and depression (59.8%), respectively. Anxiety was also more prevalent (57.3) among respondents in Chittagong, followed by depression (47.7%) and stress (39.5%). As the coexistence of symptoms, 52.8% of respondents in Dhaka, 34.4% in Chittagong experienced depression, anxiety and stress simultaneously. Moreover, in both Dhaka and Chittagong, all three psychological symptoms were strongly correlated in pairs. Multivariate analysis revealed that the most consistent factors associated with mild to moderate (MM), and severe to extremely severe (SES) depression were respondents from Chittagong who were illiterate or primary educated (OR = 0.166, CI: 0.076-0.364 for MM and OR = 0.041, CI: 0.013-0.131 for SES), male (OR = 0.999, CI: 0.666-1.496 for MM and OR = 0.395, CI: 0.249-0.625 for SES), single (OR = 0.393, CI: 0.157-0.982 for MM and OR = 0.121, CI: 0.049-0.303 for SES) and married (OR = 0.403, CI: 0.177-0.916 for MM and OR = 0.075, CI: 0.033-0.167 for SES), had a family of size ≤ 4 (OR = 0.253, CI: 0.140-0.458 for MM and OR = 0.114, CI: 0.059-0.218 for SES) and a family of size 5-6 (OR = 0.151, CI: 0.084-0.272), and no family members at risk being infected with Covid-19 (OR = 0.699, CI: 0.487-1.002 for MM and OR = 0.332, CI: 0.199-0.522 for SES). The analysis yielded similar findings for the other two mental health subscales, such as anxiety and stress. For respondents in Dhaka, the effect of factors other than sex on psychological distress was the opposite in Chittagong. Overall, psychological distress during the outbreak was greater among respondents in Dhaka than in Chittagong if respondents were not classified based on various characteristics. Conclusion: This study showed that in both Dhaka and Chittagong, a substantially large portion of Covid-19-infected respondents experienced all three psychological distress (e.g., depression, anxiety and stress). Regardless of the dissimilarity between the results in Dhaka and Chittagong, better mental health support was needed for women in both cities.

7.
Eur J Investig Health Psychol Educ ; 12(8): 1082-1107, 2022 Aug 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1987696

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has impacted mental health and affected education due to the shift to remote learning. The purpose of the current study was to assess the mental health of pharmacy students one year following the onset of the pandemic. A descriptive cross-sectional questionnaire was distributed to pharmacy students. The severity of depression, anxiety, and stress was assessed by the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21), and resilience was assessed by the Brief Resilience Scale (BRS). COVID-19-related economic, educational, and health stressors, and students' vaccine attitudes were surveyed. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariable analysis were used, and a p-value of <0.05 was considered significant. A total of 561 students participated; 37% had mild-to-moderate depression, 37% had severe-to-extremely-severe anxiety, and 52% demonstrated normal stress levels. Severe depression, anxiety, and stress were associated with smoking and feeling isolated due to COVID-19. Around 40% of students had low resilience, associated with smoking, being in the third or fourth year of pharmacy study, and the consumption of caffeinated beverages. The mean score of satisfaction with online learning was 60.3 ± 21.3%. Only 5% of participants were vaccinated, of which 87% trusted the benefits of vaccines and their role in controlling the pandemic. One year after the onset of COVID-19, depression, anxiety, stress, and low resilience were observed among pharmacy students; the investigation of the long-term mental effects of the pandemic on university students is warranted.

8.
Asean Journal of Psychiatry ; 23(4):12, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1976282

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The Covid-19 pandemic most certainly impacted the mental health of healthcare professionals in Malaysia. Aim: The aim of our research is to assess the mental health of house officers in Malaysia during the COVID-19 pandemic and to compare this with the pre-pandemic times. Method: 122 house officers from 28 hospitals in Malaysia were recruited into the study and completed an online questionnaire of their demographics, including the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 items (DASS-21), Satisfaction with Life Scale and Brief Resilience Scale. Results: Results showed that depression (36.1%), anxiety (33.7%) and stress (23.8%) were all prevalent among house officers with depression being the most prevalent among the three. Majority of the house officers were slightly satisfied with life (30.3%) and most of them had normal resilience (71.3%). Discussion: We compared our study with 5 other studies from 2010 to 2017 and found similar prevalence in depression, anxiety and stress except for the study in 2017 which showed overall prevalence in depression, anxiety and stress. 8.2% of our subjects recorded extremely severe depression, which is almost twice as much as the two studies we have for comparison. Conclusion: Housemanship training in Malaysia is indeed a stressful period for junior doctors especially in times of the COVID-19 pandemic. More support systems should be made.

9.
J Clin Med ; 11(15)2022 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957359

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The negative effect of COVID-19 pandemic on college students' mental health is well-demonstrated. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of the pandemic on the students of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Northern Greece), in terms of stress, anxiety, and depression, and to analyze the probable correlation of various social and phycological factors. METHODS: The survey was conducted in the form of a questionnaire, which was first distributed in November 2020 and then re-launched in November 2021. The evaluation was carried out through the DASS21 screening tool. Associations regarding participants' characteristics and the three variables (stress, anxiety, and depression) were investigated with Pearson's chi-squared (Χ2) test. RESULTS: The first-year results (November 2020) revealed severe prevalence of stress, anxiety, and depression (37.4%, 27.2% and 47% respectively). The second-year results (November 2021) revealed a significant augmentation in all three variables, mainly for the extreme severe scales (47.3%, 41.1% and 55% respectively). Participants who were receiving psychiatric treatment exhibited higher levels of stress, anxiety, and depression, especially during the second year of the pandemic (p-Value < 0.00001). Female students' mental health was at higher risk, as elevated prevalence of negative symptoms was observed (p-Value < 0.00001). CONCLUSIONS: The community of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki has been greatly affected during the last 2 years. The inherent risks of the confinement measures on students' well-being and mental health are undeniable. Recurrent annual psychological evaluation in universities and colleges is strongly advised.

10.
Front Psychol ; 13: 865306, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933837

ABSTRACT

Natural disasters cause long-term psychological problems and increase substance use in some adults. However, it is unclear whether disasters also lead to these problems in adolescents. We hypothesized the influence of adolescent resilience on mobile phone addiction during the normalization of COVID-19 and flooding. We tested the mediating role of coping style and depression, anxiety, and stress (DASS) on phone addiction among 1,751 adolescents in the Henan Province in China. The adolescents were surveyed via an online questionnaire, and we used structural equation modeling to examine the correlations and moderation effects. The results show that coping style and DASS could mediate the relationship between adolescent resilience and mobile phone addiction among Chinese adolescents. A chain of coping styles and DASS mediated the relationship between adolescent resilience and mobile phone addiction in Chinese adolescents.

11.
Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences Quarterly ; 38(4):1073, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1918856

ABSTRACT

The main objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of stress, anxiety and depression, among nurses working in a tertiary hospital dedicated to the COVID-19 patients in Sri Lanka. A cross-sectional study was carried out among nurses working at Colombo East Base Hospital. The data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire and DASS-21, a set of three self-report scales designed to measure the negative emotional states of depression, anxiety, and stress over three months from October 2020. Data were analysed applying descriptive statistics and inferential statistical methods. There was a total of 131 study participants (response rate 83%), and most of them were working in general wards (56%), while 42% were in critical care units. The proportion of anxiety and stress is associated with nurses working in critical care units were significantly higher than those in general wards (p<0.001). There were no associations between sex, marital status, having children, experience, qualifications, and medical or psychiatric conditions (p>0.05). The system of reporting mental health issues was unfortunately not in place. Staff felt that reporting stress/burnout or anxiety might seem like a negative attribute. Considering the above factors, one would expect more prevalence than we have seen in this study;therefore, we can infer that if mental health is not prioritised in healthcare institutions, then definitely lack of awareness/openness and under-reporting by staff will result in a long-term systemic problem (Suffering in the name of Resilience).

12.
Recent Advances in Computer Science and Communications ; 15(6):822-831, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1892499

ABSTRACT

Objective: The world is facing the pandemic of COVID-19, which has led to a considerable level of stress and depression in mankind as well as in society. Statistical measurements can be made for early identification of the stress and depression level and prevention of the pre-vailing stressful conditions. Several studies have been carried out in this regard. The Machine learning model is the best way to predict the level of stress and depression in humankind by statistically analyzing the behavior of humans which helps in the early detection of stress and de-pression. This helps to prevent society from psychological pressures from any disaster like COVID-19. COVID-19 pandemic is one of the public health emergencies that are of great international concern. It imposes a great physiological burden and challenges on the population of the country facing the calamity caused by this disease. Methods: In this paper, the authors conducted a survey based on some questionnaires related to depression and stress and used the machine learning approach to predict the stress and depression level of humankind in the pandemic of COVID-19. The data sets were analyzed using the Multiple Linear Regression Model. The predicted score of stress and depression was mapped into DASS-21. The predictions have been made over different age groups, gender, and categories. The machine learning model is the best way to predict the level of stress and depression in humans by statistically analyzing their behavior which helps in the early detection of stress and depression. Results: Women, in general, were more stressed and depressed than men. Moreover, the people who are 45+ years of age were found to be more stressed and depressed, including male and fe-male students. The overall analysis showed that the people of India were stressed and depressed at “Serve” level due to COVID-19. It may be because students were more depressed about their study and career, women were stressed about their business as well as their salary and aged people were depressed due to their health concerns in COVID-19 disaster. Conclusion: The researchers conducted an analysis of data based on DASS-21 parameters defined for anxiety, depression, and stress at the global level. By the analysis defined in section 5, researchers concluded that the people of India are more stressed and depressed at "Serve" level due to COVID-19. © 2022 Bentham Science Publishers.

13.
Open Psychology Journal ; 15, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1892464

ABSTRACT

Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) announced a public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC) on 30 January 2020 due to the rapid increase in the number of COVID-19 cases outside China. Every pandemic is associated with other problems such as psychological and mental health problems. Methods: The current research investigated the relationship between mental health status and demographic variables and the psychological impact of COVID-19. Furthermore, this study explored the relationship between collectivism and low infection rates. The sample included 1700 adults aged 18 years and older. The questionnaire started with demographic questions followed by the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), a scale that was applied to the COVID-19 outbreak, and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Results: Findings indicated that depression, anxiety, and stress were associated with the psychological impact of COVID-19. In addition, students experienced a higher level of psychological impact of COVID-19 than other occupational groups. Finally, cultural collectivism was associated with a lower COVID-19 infection rate. Conclusion: It is recommended based on the findings of this paper that the mental health of university students should be observed and assessed during epidemics. Training regarding mental health should be provided to university faculty and staff. © 2022 Azizah Alqahtani.

14.
Asia Pac J Public Health ; 34(5): 561-564, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854664

ABSTRACT

Cases and death counts rise as the world continues to scuffle with the COVID-19 pandemic and its catastrophic effects. Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at a heightened risk of developing psychological distress during the pandemic as a result of extreme work demands and poor experiences of recovery. This study aimed to evaluate the mental health outcomes of HCWs in hospitals during the pandemic and explore the associated psychosocial, individual, and work-related factors of depression and anxiety among them. The present study employed a cross-sectional survey study design. Participants from the Department of Medicine, Department of Surgery, and Department of Emergency were recruited via an online based questionnaire. A validated screening tool, the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) questionnaire was utilized to assess the status of anxiety and depression among the HCWs. The prevalence of anxiety and depression among the HCWs were 12.2% and 1.4%, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analysis further demonstrated that being male (OR = 1.581) and having work-related stigma was significantly associated with anxiety (OR = 2.635).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence
15.
Mater Sociomed ; 33(4): 257-261, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1835510

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pandemic of COVID-19 has affected all spheres of life, including education. Teachers at all levels were faced with numerous challenges during the pandemic. These challenges had an impact on their mental health. OBJECTIVE: The goal of the present study was to examine the depression, anxiety, and stress levels in teachers in Bosnia and Herzegovina. METHODS: The sample for this study consisted of 559 teachers (471 female teachers and 88 male teachers). We used the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS 21) to measure teachers' emotional states of depression, anxiety, and stress. RESULTS: The findings of this study clearly indicate the high levels of depression, anxiety, and stress in teachers. We also identified that levels of support provided by family members and school administration served as protective factors in the time of crisis. CONCLUSION: Teachers in Bosnia and Herzegovina have a high prevalence of elevated depression, anxiety, and stress levels. The article concludes with some recommendations on how to improve the mental health of teachers.

16.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 309, 2022 Apr 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1799103

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The long-term psychological effects of COVID-19 on dental students are unclear. The aim of this cross-sectional online study was to investigate the psychological effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on dental students. METHOD: The Quality of Life Scale (WHOQOL-BREF) was sent to all dental students through Google Forms to evaluate their quality of life (QoL), and the DASS-21 scale was used to evaluate their psychosocial status due to distance learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. The answers were analyzed both on the basis of year of education and type of education (online versus classroom learning). One-way ANOVA was used for comparison of students in the different years of education; post hoc LSD test was used for pairwise comparisons. Sample t-test was used to compare the two groups separated as classroom/face-to-face learning and distance/online learning. RESULT: The questionnaire was completed by 580 students with a response rate of 87.74%. According to the QoL scale results, there was no significant difference between the groups regarding general health, physical health, and psychology, both between different years and learning methods (p > 0.05). According to the results of the DASS-21 scale, anxiety and depression in the 3rd year students were significantly higher than the other years. The stress level of the 2nd year students was statistically significantly different from the other years (p < 0.05). Evaluation of anxiety, stress and the QoL showed an overall detrimental effect of distance learning on the dental students, although the evaluation did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Anxiety, stress and factors affecting the quality of life negatively affected dental students who received online/distance learning, although the difference did not reach statistical significance when compared to students who received in-classroom learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Dental
17.
Journal of Global Information Management ; 30(4):1-27, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1753735

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of COVID-19 has created a major panic among the agricultural sectors as well as the farmers in India owing to its’ transmissions, severity, and a lack of proper treatment methodology. From the cross-sectional study with the help of designed questionnaire relating to the “demographic-information”, ”knowledge, attitudes and practices” of Indian farmers and “DASS-21 variables”, the data from 143 farmers’ were collected and analyzed. Further, by using the "Interpretive Structural Modeling (ISM)" approach, an ISM model was developed followed by MICMAC analysis for possible mitigation measures during this pandemic outbreak. The findings provided the interrelationships among the possible mitigation measures for the farmers as well as for the benefits in Indian agricultures, which can be suitably used in appropriate psychological-interventions preparation for improving the mental-health among the farmers during this pandemic period.

18.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 184, 2022 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745476

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Researchers are exploring the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, treatment, vaccination and the challenges faced by healthcare authorities. However less focus is being paid towards the impact of COVID-19 on mental health of the patients. This study is a cross-sectional study, measuring the prevalence of emotional distress among patients with COVID-19 in the Maldivian population. METHODS: This study was conducted in Maldivian nations above 18 of age with COVID-19 who were admitted in isolation facilities. Patients who were on treatment for any other chronic medical conditions, severe and critical COVID-19 disease were excluded. This study was conducted over a period of 2 months by administering a local translated version of DASS21 questionnaire. RESULTS: The total of 195 patients were included in this study. The mean age of the patients was 40 (CI at 95% 38-42) years. The respondents were 48.7% men and 51.3% women. Overall, 9% of patients with COVID-19 had depression while 23% of patients had anxiety and 12% of the patients had stress. There was a statistically significant relationship between gender and depression, anxiety and stress (p < 0.01). Symptomatic cases had a significantly higher level of stress than asymptomatic patients (p < 0.05), but no significant association was observed with symptomatic status and anxiety or depression. CONCLUSION: The management of patients with COVID-19 should be multi-disciplinary with special focus on the mental wellbeing of our patients. We should aim to establish proper communication with the patients in order to identify emotional distress and provide appropriate mental health care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
19.
Clin Epidemiol Glob Health ; 15: 101004, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1734236

ABSTRACT

Problem considered: Medical students are vulnerable to poor sleep quality which may lead to attention difficulties and poor academic performance. Good quality sleep is needed for optimal neurocognitive and psychomotor functions as well as physical and mental health. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of poor sleep quality among undergraduate medical students during home confinement at the time of Covid-19 pandemic and analyze the relationship between sleep quality and relevant socio-demographic and psychological variables. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 284 undergraduate medical students of a teaching hospital of Bhubaneswar from October-November 2020. Using a semi-structured questionnaire, relevant information was collected. Sleep quality of the students was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire and mental health status of the students using Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale - 21 (DASS-21). Results: The prevalence of poor sleep quality among undergraduate medical students was 45%. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that students doing exercise for <3 days/week (AOR: 1.81, 95% CI: 1.01-3.23), spending ≥8 h screen time/day (AOR: 2.02, 95%: 1.12-3.66), having anxiety symptoms (AOR: 3.61, 95% CI: 1.72-7.57), and those who were not satisfied with own self (AOR: 2.69, 95% CI: 1.35-5.38) were more likely to report poor sleep quality. Conclusion: Poor sleep quality was prevalent among undergraduate medical students during their home confinement at the time of Covid-19 pandemic. Sleep educational programs, anxiety management, and lifestyle modifications can be recommended to improve sleep quality among medical students.

20.
Psychol Res Behav Manag ; 13: 1047-1055, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725157

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 (coronavirus disease-2019) has been associated with psychological distress during its rapid rise period in Pakistan. The present study aimed to assess the mental health of healthcare workers (HCWs) in the three metropolitan cities of Pakistan. METHODS: A cross-sectional, web-based study was conducted in 276 HCWs from April 10, 2020, to June 5, 2020. Depression, anxiety, and stress scale (DASS-21) were used for the mental health assessment of the HCWs. Multivariable logistic regression analysis (MLRA) was performed to measure the association between the demographics and the occurrence of depression, anxiety, and stress (DAS). RESULTS: The frequency of DAS in the HCWs was 10.1%, 25.4%, and 7.3%, respectively. The MLRA showed that the depression in HCWs was significantly associated with the profession (P<0.001). The anxiety in HCWs was significantly associated with their age (P=0.005), profession (P<0.05), and residence (P<0.05). The stress in HCWs was significantly associated with their age (P<0.05). LIMITATION: This study was conducted in the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, when the number of COVID-19 cases was on the rise in Pakistan and it only represents a definite period (April to June 2020). CONCLUSION: The symptoms of DAS are present in the HCWs of Pakistan and to manage the psychological health of HCWs, there is a need for the initiation of psychological well-being programs.

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