Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 50
Filter
1.
J For Res (Harbin) ; : 1-13, 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2129111

ABSTRACT

As the COVID-19 pandemic unfolded, questions arose as to whether the pandemic would amplify or pacify tropical deforestation. Early reports warned of increased deforestation rates; however, these studies were limited to a few months in 2020 or to selected regions. To better understand how the pandemic influenced tropical deforestation globally, this study used historical deforestation data (2004-2019) from the Terra-i pantropical land cover change monitoring system to project expected deforestation trends for 2020, which were used to determine whether observed deforestation deviated from expected trajectories after the first COVID-19 cases were reported. Time series analyses were conducted at the regional level for the Americas, Africa and Asia and at the country level for Brazil, Colombia, Peru, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Indonesia. Our results suggest that the pandemic did not alter the course of deforestation trends in some countries (e.g., Brazil, Indonesia), while it did in others (e.g., Peru). We posit the importance of monitoring the long-term effects of the pandemic on deforestation trends as countries prioritize economic recovery in the aftermath of the pandemic. Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s11676-022-01561-7.

2.
Ecol Evol ; 12(11): e9550, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2127671

ABSTRACT

Although the COVID-19 lockdowns in 2020 had some environmental benefits, the pandemic's impact on the global economy has also had conservation repercussions, especially in biodiverse nations. Ecuador, which is heavily reliant on petroleum, agricultural exports, and ecotourism, experienced a rise in poverty in response to pandemic shutdowns. In this study, we sought to quantify levels of illegal timber extraction and poaching before and after the start of COVID-19 lockdowns throughout two protected areas (Reserva Jama Coaque [JCR] and Bosque Seco Lalo Loor [BSLL]) in the endangered Pacific Forest of Ecuador. We analyzed chainsaw and gunshot acoustic data recorded from devices installed in the forest canopy from December 2019 to March 2020 and October 2020 to March 2021. Results from generalized linear mixed effects models indicated less chainsaw activity before lockdowns (ßpost.lockdown = 0.568 ± 0.266 SE, p-value = .030), although increased average rainfall also seemed to negatively affect chainsaw activity (ßavg.rainfall = -0.002 ± 0.0006 SE, p-value = .003). Gunshots were too infrequent to conduct statistical models; however, 87% of gunshots were detected during the 'lockdown' period. Observational data collected by rangers from these protected areas also noted an increase in poaching activities beginning mid to late 2020 and persisting into 2021. These results add to the steadily growing literature indicating an increase in environmental crime, particularly in biodiverse nations, catalyzed by COVID-19-related economic hardships. Identifying areas where environmental crime increased during pandemic lockdowns is vital to address both socioeconomic drivers and enforcement deficiencies to prevent further biodiversity loss and disease outbreaks and to promote ecosystem resilience. Our study also demonstrates the utility of passive acoustic monitoring to detect illegal resource extraction patterns, which can inform strategies such as game theory modeling for ranger patrol circuits and placement of real-time acoustic detection technologies to monitor and mitigate environmental crimes.

3.
Egyptian Journal of Soil Science ; 61(4):445-457, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2124174

ABSTRACT

Upon the outbreak and spreading of COVID-19, several reduction measures have been implemented throughout the world to avert the COVID-19 pandemic risks such as entire lockdowns, social distancing, extensive travel bans, mass quarantines, etc. Many positive and negative indicators of this pandemic on the whole environmental compartments have been reported worldwide. These indicators may include promoting the air quality through a reduction in anthropogenic-based emissions (e.g., CO2 and N2O) and increase ozone concentration in addition to energy, water and wastewater, deforestation, and natural resources. This is the difficult equation concerningthe COVID-19 pandemic outbreak and its health, societal, economic, and environmental risks and how is the recovery of the environment? Is this recovery will be permanent or temporary? The answer to this question may be emphasized during the outcoming days or months. What will increase this global pandemic aggravation if the COVID-19 has appeared in many types, which enforce us to re-think again concerning the task?

4.
Conservation Science and Practice ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070506

ABSTRACT

Unsustainable wildlife trade is a major driver of biodiversity loss and an important public health threat. Yet, effective wildlife trade regulation is currently at odds with food security and economic incentives provided by this global, multibillion-dollar industry. Given such limitations, public health and conservation resources can be aligned to target species for which trade both increases risk of extinction and threatens public health. Here, we developed a simple conservation and health trade risk (CHT) index (range: 2-50) using a case study of traded mammals based on species' extinction and zoonotic risks, weighed by the extent of their trade. We applied this index to 1161 International Union for the Conservation of Nature-listed terrestrial mammals involved in the wildlife trade to identify 284 high-priority species that scored high in the CHT index (CHT >= 18). Species ranking high for conservation, public health, and trade risks include those belonging to the orders Primates, Cetartiodactyla (even-toed ungulates), Rodentia (rodents), Chiroptera (bats), and Carnivora (carnivores). Of the high-priority species, 33% (n = 95) are country-endemics and may be good candidates for trade regulations and enforcement at national scales. Our study provides a preliminary step in prioritizing species, taxonomic groups, and countries for focused wildlife trade regulation to meet both conservation and public health goals.

5.
Sustainability ; 14(16):9990, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024125

ABSTRACT

Environmental problems due to human activities such as deforestation, urbanisation, and large scale intensive farming are some of the major factors behind the rapid spread of many infectious diseases. This in turn poses significant challenges not only in as regards providing adequate healthcare, but also in supporting healthcare workers, medical researchers, policy makers, and others involved in managing infectious diseases. These challenges include surveillance, tracking of infections, communication of public health knowledge and promotion of behavioural change. Behind these challenges lies a complex set of factors which include not only biomedical and population health determinants but also environmental, climatic, geographic, and socioeconomic variables. While there is broad agreement that these factors are best understood when considered in conjunction, aggregating and presenting diverse information sources requires effective information systems, software tools, and data visualisation. In this article, we argue that interactive maps, which couple geographical information systems and advanced information visualisation techniques, provide a suitable unifying framework for coordinating these tasks. Therefore, we examine how interactive maps can support spatial epidemiological visualisation and modelling involving distributed and dynamic data sources and incorporating temporal aspects of disease spread. Combining spatial and temporal aspects can be crucial in such applications. We discuss these issues in the context of support for disease surveillance in remote regions, utilising tools that facilitate distributed data collection and enable multidisciplinary collaboration, while also providing support for simulation and data analysis. We show that interactive maps deployed on a combination of mobile devices and large screens can provide effective means for collection, sharing, and analysis of health data.

6.
SciDev.net ; 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2011341

ABSTRACT

Speed read Time to spur a clean industrial revolution, says UN environment and faith advisor Need to transition to resilient, local, urban agro-ecological farming, producing food with less energy and water Post-COVID19 economic shift requires incentivising rapid growth of sustainable production Much has been made of the brief respite in carbon emissions that coronavirus has given the world. Fossil fuels, agriculture and deforestation The first priority must shift trillion-dollar fossil fuel subsidies into the renewable energy sector. Agriculture is also one of the biggest carbon emitters, with huge inputs of fossil fuels involved in manufacturing pesticides and fertiliser, plus processing, packaging and distribution.

7.
SciDev.net ; 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2010828

ABSTRACT

“Halting and reversing forest loss is increasingly recognised as a means to mitigate the effects of climate change and address biodiversity collapses” Johan Oldekop, University of Manchester FAO’s State of the World’s Forests Report 2020 says that the majority of new infectious diseases are zoonotic and their emergence may be linked to changes in forest areas, as well as the expansion of human populations into forest areas. According to the study, the unprecedented exodus of forest communities to urban areas is shaping the future of forests. According to the study, during 2001—2015, 27 per cent of forest disturbance was attributed to commodity-driven deforestation.

8.
International Journal of Tourism Cities ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2005050

ABSTRACT

Purpose This study aims to explore green hotel visitors' afforestation intentions by extending the theory of planned behavior, including post-COVID-19 personal norms (PCPN) and post-COVID-19 environmental concerns (PCECs). Moreover, this study examines the mediating effect of PCECs from the post-COVID-19 perspective. Design/methodology/approach This study is based on existing literatures and collection of 384 usable responses using the convenience sampling technique. The partial least square structural equation modeling is used to analyze data using Smart PLS3.3.3. Findings The findings reveal that post-COVID-19 afforestation attitudes, subjective norms (SN), perceived behavioral control (PBC) and PCPN significantly influence post-COVID-19 afforestation intentions (PCAI) and PCECs. Further, PCEC partially mediates the between post-COVID-19 afforestation attitudes, SN, PBC and PCPN and PCAI. Practical implications The findings of this study may be useful to green hotel operators in formulating business strategies enhancing visitors' positive perceptions toward green hotels and afforestation intentions coping with new normal environment and hospitality industry. Originality/value This research presents a distinguished case highlighting how the green hotel guests' perceptions toward afforestation for mitigating carbon emissions are changing because of COVID-19 pandemic. This study provides crucial insights for green hotel practitioners by integrating post-COVID-19 afforestation attitudes, SN, PBC, PCPN and PCEC of green hotel visitors in examining PCAI.

9.
New Microbes and New Infections ; 48, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2004381
10.
Revista Brasileira de Estudos Africanos = Brazilian Journal of African Studies ; 7(13), 2022.
Article in Portuguese | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2002813

ABSTRACT

Prevê-se que a mudança climática exerça mais pressão sobre as ecologias e sistemas de saúde já explorados. Além disso, o coronavírus SARS-CoV-2 (Covid-19) representou um estímulo para revolucionar os modelos existentes de desenvolvimento sustentável em cadeias de suprimentos amplas e sustentáveis no setor da saúde em particular. A Região da Biosfera Kruger-Canyons na África do Sul e o estado do Amazonas no Brasil servem como estudos de caso geográficos para este artigo. O impacto da globalização econômica, catástrofes naturais como secas, tensões econômicas e geopolíticas, desmatamento, desigualdades econômicas e de acesso à saúde nesses dois biomas convergem com questões de mudança climática e reduzem os mecanismos de enfrentamento que costumam ser usados ​​para supervisionar eventos extremos, como pandemias . A pandemia Covid-19 agravou muitas das dificuldades econômicas e sociais que a África do Sul e o Brasil já enfrentam. Em comparação com o Brasil, a resposta geral da África do Sul à pandemia pode ser considerada um destaque. Ao tomar emprestado das melhores práticas de respostas anteriores de saúde pública a emergências de saúde na África do Sul, como a tuberculose e a crise de HIV/AIDS, a África do Sul demonstrou seus meios comparativamente bem-sucedidos de lidar com a Covid-19.Alternate : Climate change is predicted to exert further stress on already exploited ecologies and healthcare systems, added to this, the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (Covid-19) has signified a stimulus to revolutionize existing models of sustainable development in broad, and sustainable supply chains in the healthcare sector in particular. The Kruger to Canyons Biosphere Region in South Africa and the Amazonas state in Brazil serve as geographic case studies for this paper. The impact of economic globalization, natural catastrophes such as droughts, economic and geopolitical stresses, deforestation, economic and healthcare access inequalities in these two biomes converge with issues of climate change, and undercut coping mechanisms that are customarily used to oversee extreme events such as pandemics. The Covid-19 pandemic has deepened many of the economic and social difficulties which South Africa and Brazil are already facing. In comparison to Brazil, South Africa’s overall response to the pandemic can be regarded as a standout. By borrowing from best practices from prior public health responses to heath emergencies in South Africa, such as the tuberculosis and the HIV/AIDS crisis, South Africa has demonstrated its comparatively successful means of dealing with Covid-19.

11.
Revista Brasileira de Estudos Africanos = Brazilian Journal of African Studies ; 7(13), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2002812

ABSTRACT

Climate change is predicted to exert further stress on already exploited ecologies and healthcare systems, added to this, the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (Covid-19) has signified a stimulus to revolutionize existing models of sustainable development in broad, and sustainable supply chains in the healthcare sector in particular. The Kruger to Canyons Biosphere Region in South Africa and the Amazonas state in Brazil serve as geographic case studies for this paper. The impact of economic globalization, natural catastrophes such as droughts, economic and geopolitical stresses, deforestation, economic and healthcare access inequalities in these two biomes converge with issues of climate change, and undercut coping mechanisms that are customarily used to oversee extreme events such as pandemics. The Covid-19 pandemic has deepened many of the economic and social difficulties which South Africa and Brazil are already facing. In comparison to Brazil, South Africa’s overall response to the pandemic can be regarded as a standout. By borrowing from best practices from prior public health responses to heath emergencies in South Africa, such as the tuberculosis and the HIV/AIDS crisis, South Africa has demonstrated its comparatively successful means of dealing with Covid-19.Alternate : Prevê-se que a mudança climática exerça mais pressão sobre as ecologias e sistemas de saúde já explorados. Além disso, o coronavírus SARS-CoV-2 (Covid-19) representou um estímulo para revolucionar os modelos existentes de desenvolvimento sustentável em cadeias de suprimentos amplas e sustentáveis no setor da saúde em particular. A Região da Biosfera Kruger-Canyons na África do Sul e o estado do Amazonas no Brasil servem como estudos de caso geográficos para este artigo. O impacto da globalização econômica, catástrofes naturais como secas, tensões econômicas e geopolíticas, desmatamento, desigualdades econômicas e de acesso à saúde nesses dois biomas convergem com questões de mudança climática e reduzem os mecanismos de enfrentamento que costumam ser usados ​​para supervisionar eventos extremos, como pandemias . A pandemia Covid-19 agravou muitas das dificuldades econômicas e sociais que a África do Sul e o Brasil já enfrentam. Em comparação com o Brasil, a resposta geral da África do Sul à pandemia pode ser considerada um destaque. Ao tomar emprestado das melhores práticas de respostas anteriores de saúde pública a emergências de saúde na África do Sul, como a tuberculose e a crise de HIV/AIDS, a África do Sul demonstrou seus meios comparativamente bem-sucedidos de lidar com a Covid-19.

12.
SciDev.net ; 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1999633

ABSTRACT

Speed read UN report shows clear links between global disasters Lack of risk management and climate change among common causes Tackling root causes across disciplines is essential, report says Extreme events are increasingly compounding each other, even if they initially seem wide apart and unconnected, making it more crucial to tackle their root causes, says a report. In turn, deforestation is linked to Western demand for meat, and has a knock-on effect on climate change, exacerbating extreme events elsewhere in the world, says the report. Need to strengthen Strengthening networks for sharing prevention and response experiences between countries, and mechanisms for international cooperation and allocation of funds, is critical says Tran Si Pha, head of the disaster management department at the Vietnam Red Cross Society.

13.
SciDev.net ; 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1999345

ABSTRACT

Speed read Legislative changes in Brazil have ‘weakened environmental regulations’ Legal deregulation peaked at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, study found Brazilian society, scientists and media may have mitigated the damage Environmental progress in Brazil looks set to be one of the casualties of COVID-19, with harmful changes to the law being pushed through while attention is diverted by the global pandemic, a study warns. Since January 2019, the Brazilian government approved 57 pieces of legislation that effectively weaken national environmental laws, the study published in Biological Conservation found. Researchers also analysed monthly deforestation rates provided by the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) of Brazil, and fines associated with illegal deforestation, issued by the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (IBAMA). According to INPE, deforestation in the Amazon was 9.5 per cent higher between August 2019 and July 2020 than between August 2018 and July 2019 – making it the highest level of annual deforestation since 2008.

14.
SciDev.net ; 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1998817

ABSTRACT

Speed read Wuhan investigation points to wildlife as likely source of COVID-19 Climate change and illegal trade are increasing risk of zoonotic disease transmission Wildlife protection, surveillance of zoonosis are key to early detection of ‘spillover events’ Understanding animal disease is essential if we want to prevent future pandemics, writes Keith Hamilton. [...]deforestation and climate change result in natural habitat loss and push animals, in their search for food or a new home, into human settlements. The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), the standard-setting organisation for animal health and welfare, champions this approach and is developing guidelines and standards for wildlife trade which support animal welfare and biodiversity conservation.

15.
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL ON MINORITY AND GROUP RIGHTS ; 29(3):528-576, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1968403

ABSTRACT

This article analyses the impact of COVID-19 on the rights of indigenous peoples, particularly in Brazil. It deals with the current situation of the Brazilian indigenous peoples, the impacts of the pandemic, the rights created on the adoption of protective sanitary measures for indigenous people and land rights in Brazil. Does the Brazilian government comply with international law, with constitutional rights of indigenous peoples in the current COVID-19 crisis, particularly with the Brazilian Supreme Court decision on the adoption of protective sanitary measures for indigenous people? With a focus on the 2020 Report of the Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, this paper will identify and examine the gaps in protection of the indigenous peoples rights by reason of the impact of the cow n-19 crisis. This paper argues that the crisis is misused as an occasion for land invasions, deforestation, forest fires and the denial of basic indigenous rights. Especially in Brazil, a transformative change, an emergency support for indigenous peoples, and a still stand agreement on logging and extractive industries operating next to indigenous communities are needed. Brazilian NGO statements give guidelines as to how to manage the threats of the present pandemic on indigenous peoples of Brazil. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, the United Nations and the International Labour Organisation all offer further relevant suggestions as to how to address the serious impacts in the response to and the aftermath of this crisis.

16.
Bulletin de l'Academie Veterinaire de France ; 173(1):192-195, 2020.
Article in French | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1939257
17.
Natural Volatiles & Essential Oils ; 9(1):1654-1665, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904447

ABSTRACT

Since the last decade, prior to the emergence of COVID-19, the incidence of pneumonia, pneumonia in Indonesia has steadily increased (Minister of Health RI, 2020) along with deforestation phenomenon (Adhyaksa et al, 2019) and global warming (Mirsaeidi et al, 2016). Forest recovery ecosystem is a must to negate this disease. This research was conducted on determining the economic value of the ecosystem service to compensate reforestation program. This research was conducted in Lampung Province started from May to October 2021, by utilizing of Landsat imagery series of 2009, 2012, 2015, 2018, and 2019 for detecting forest covers. The effect on the incidence of pneumonia was determined using multiple linear regression models and to make some simulations work for estimating the reforestation costs. The results prove that the increasement air temperature, and the changes area of state forests, people's forests, bare land, plantations, and urban areas affect the incidence of pneumonia significantly. The determination of the value of environmental services for public costs is required at IDR 942,227,915,- from the maintenance cost of IDR 249,216,000, the cost of reforestation at the state forest area of 5,907,792 Ha and the people's forest of 6,040,689 Ha in case the air temperature increase up to 2 degrees C as the way to mitigate the global warming.

18.
Forests ; 13(5):687, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871668

ABSTRACT

The world’s forest area decreased to three point nine billion hectares in 2015, a net annual loss of 3.3 million hectares, and large-scale deforestation is occurring in the tropics. Furthermore, greenhouse gas emissions are increasing as forests are converted to other uses such as agricultural land. Against this backdrop, sustainable forest management is becoming increasingly important. This study attempts to quantify people’s general awareness and values concerning for on-line shopping habits (in this study, for wooden furniture) in terms of sustainable forest management in Japan by estimating the acceptable price premium or willingness of consumers to pay for wood-related products made using wood produced under sustainable forest management as the raw material. The study proceeds to quantify the awareness and values of consumers concerning sustainable forest management and conservation of forest environments. Consumers were found to have a certain willingness to pay for wooden furniture made from wood produced through sustainable forest management. As a consequence of this analysis, it was revealed that consumers place a high value on sustainable forest management and environmental conservation, and that they are willing to act on these values when purchasing wood-related products.

19.
Eurasian Journal of Business and Management ; 10(1):62-75, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871524

ABSTRACT

High incidence of drought and donor fatigue in Zimbabwe calls for more sustainable measures of ensuring food security. This study analyzed the impact of nutritional gardens in the two droughtprone districts of Mudzi and Mutoko. In line with attaining Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) targeted to be achieved by 2030, nutritional gardens were identified as a sustainable way to mitigate climate change and address the 'hidden hunger' challenge. Primary data was collected using a baseline framework adopting a triangulation methodology of questionnaires, interviews and focus group discussions (FGDs) across 100 households and key informant stakeholders. Data for 48 households was usable. Results indicated that majority are low-income earners. There are high levels of deforestation and siltation, low water table and low harvest due to frequent droughts. Main crops are drought resistant crops such as millet, sorghum and legumes like groundnuts. Gardens present great potential for food and nutrition supplement and income from the sale of horticultural products. COVID-19 increased vulnerability of all stakeholders across the whole value-chain. The study recommends more drought-resistant varieties, horticultural products, solar powered boreholes and value-adding processes like peanut butter and yoghurt production to optimize local resources.

20.
PLoS Global Public Health ; 2(3), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1854940

ABSTRACT

The vegetation loss in the Brazil's Legal Amazon (BLA) in 2020 corresponds to the highest loss observed in a decade, caused by the intensification of fires, mineral extraction activities, and other pressures. The possibility of earning from illegal activities such as deforestation and mining attracts the population to indigenous territories, while fires aggravate respiratory problems and enhance the current COVID-19 crisis. Furthermore, the BLA's road network is usually related to increased deforestation and fires in its areas of influence, and airports are known to contribute to spreading COVID-19 infections worldwide. Therefore, we decided to evaluate the effect of characteristics of Special Indigenous Health Districts (DSEIs) (including population, number of airports, and extent of the road network) and vegetation loss rates (deforestation, and area of vegetation lost by fires and mining) on the number of COVID-19 cases and deaths among the indigenous population in DSEIs in the BLA. We observed a positive correlation between the number of cases and deaths and the number of Indigenous Primary Healthcare Units, suggesting that many of these units did not increase appropriate activities for prevention and protection from COVID-19 in the DSEIs. The DSEIs with larger air transport and road networks were more affected by COVID-19. These networks constituted critical mechanisms for facilitating the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in the BLA. Additionally, we noted that changes that impact the landscape of DSEIs, such as fires and mining, also impact legal indigenous areas (IAs). Thus, IAs are not spared from exploratory processes in the district's landscape. Models that associate the air transport and road networks with the transformation of the landscape in IAs from burning or mining can explain the number of indigenous people who died due to COVID-19. These results are particularly important given the current disruptive scenario imposed by the Brazilian government on critical institutions that detect and fight fires in indigenous lands and the policies enacted to combat COVID-19 in Brazil, which are based on denying isolation measures and delaying vaccinations.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL