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1.
Zycie Weterynaryjne ; 96(1):15-23, 2021.
Article in Polish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2034286

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, the betacoronavirus that causes COVID-19, has spread rapidly around the world since December 2019. It was suspected from the beginning that the primary outbreak in China, was of a zoonotic origin, but the SARS- CoV-2 animal reservoir(s) has not been definitively identified yet. So far, it has been confirmed that numerous animal species are susceptible to infection and that experimentally infected cats, shrews, hamsters and ferrets can also shed the virus. The SARS-CoV-2 was also detected in farmed mink (Neovison vison), in which it caused both, the clinical and subclinical disease, with respiratory symptoms and increased mortality. In April 2020, the first SARS-CoV-2 cases were detected in minks in the Netherlands, and to date (November 2020), further outbreaks have been confirmed in Denmark, Italy, Spain, Sweden, the United States, Greece, France and Poland. It has also been shown that the transmission of infection from humans to minks and from minks to humans may occur. The OIE is working on the inclusion of mink in the WAHIS database and encouraging the Members to provide appropriate data for this species to improve the monitoring of the epidemiological situation worldwide and prevent the establishment of a possible new reservoir for SARS-CoV-2.

2.
HemaSphere ; 6:2679-2681, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2032097

ABSTRACT

Background: Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA) during pregnancy is a rare finding, and few is known about maternal and foetal outcomes. AIHA may either develop or relapse during gestation and postpartum or be an issue in a patient on active therapy who becomes pregnant. AIHA management during pregnancy and lactation is not standardized and drug use is often limited by safety concerns. Aims: We studied AIHA impact on pregnancy focusing on disease severity, treatment need and maternal/foetal outcome. Methods: Through a multicentric retrospective cohort study, we identified 38 pregnancies occurred in 28 women from 1997 to 2021 in 10 European centres in Italy, Denmark, France, the Netherlands, USA, and Spain. All included patients had a previous AIHA history or developed/exacerbated AIHA during gestation or postpartum. AIHA was classified according to the direct antiglobulin test. Results: We registered 18 warm AIHA (10 IgG;8 IgG+C3d), 2 cold agglutinin disease, 3 mixed and 5 atypical forms (Table 1). Evans syndrome (i.e., association of AIHA and immune thrombocytopenia or neutropenia) was present in 4. Mean age at AIHA diagnosis was 27 (3-39) and at pregnancy 32 (21-41) years. AIHA diagnosis predated pregnancy in 15 women and had required at least 1 therapy line in all of them, and >2 lines in 12 (rituximab, N=7;cytotoxic immunosuppressants, N=6;splenectomy, N=5). Among these 15 patients, 6 had a relapse during pregnancy, 3 during postpartum and 9 were on active treatment at the time of pregnancy (steroids, N=8;cyclosporine, N=1;azathioprine, N=1;the latter stopped after positive pregnancy test). A patient with a previous AIHA, relapsed as immune thrombocytopenic purpura during pregnancy. Further 8 patients had an AIHA onset during gestation and 2 postpartum. A patient had AIHA onset during the postpartum of the 1st pregnancy and relapsed during the 2nd one. In the 20 women experiencing AIHA during pregnancy/postpartum, median Hb and LDH levels were 6,4 g/dL (3,1 - 8,7) and 588 UI/L (269-1631), respectively. Management consisted in blood transfusions (N=10) and prompt establishment of steroid therapy+/-IVIG (N=20), all with response (complete N=13, partial N=7). After delivery, rituximab was necessary in 4 patients and cyclosporine was added in one. Anti-thrombotic prophylaxis was given in 7 patients. Overall, we registered 10 obstetric complications (10/38, 26%), including 4 early miscarriages, a premature rupture of membranes, a placental detachment, 2 preeclampsia, a postpartum infection and a biliary colic. Apart from the case of biliary colic and one of the two cases of preeclampsia, 8/10 complications occurred during active haemolysis and treatment for AIHA. Nine foetal adverse events (9/38, 24%) were reported: a transitory respiratory distress of the new-born in a mother with active AIHA, 3 cases of foetal growth restriction, a preterm birth, an infant reporting neurologic sequelae, a case of AIHA of the new-born requiring intravenous immunoglobulins, blood transfusions and plasma exchange, and 2 perinatal deaths. The latter both occurred in women on active AIHA therapy and were secondary to a massive placental detachment and a symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection. (Figure Presented ) Summary/Conclusion: AIHA developing/reactivating during pregnancy or postpartum is rare (about 5%) but mainly severe requiring steroid therapy and transfusions. Importantly, severe maternal and foetal complications may occur in up to 26% of cases mostly associated with active disease, pinpointing the importance of maintaining a high level of awareness. Passive maternal autoantibodies transfer to the foetus seems a rare event.

3.
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology ; 87(3):AB169, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2031393

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has changed hand hygiene practices globally. This survey reports the facial skincare habits and routines, with a focus on facial cleansing, during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: An online survey including 10,100 men and women aged 18-65 years from 23 countries and 4 continents was conducted in April 2021. 500 individuals per country (except 150 respondents from Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark) were selected using the quota method to ensure a gender, age and region representation reflective of the countries’ populations. Results: The survey response indicated 28.6% of participants noticed a change to their facial skin health because of the COVID-19 pandemic, with 15.2% indicating their skin health was worse. The pandemic changed the facial cleansing routine for 63.9%, with 24.4% cleansing more often and 15.2% cleansing longer. More subjects (14.9%) indicated they began to use products gentler for skin while only 5.3% used harsher products ‘to get rid of germs.’ Most participants (68.9%) did not a consult a dermatologist, either at their practice or virtually, in the year prior to the survey. When asked what behavior increased in the previous year compared with before, 47.3% turned to online content from social media/influencers for skincare content and advice. Information specifically on face cleansing routines was sourced largely from worth of mouth (26.5%), social media/influencers (20.6%), among other sources. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic is associated with a change in facial cleansing routines. Individuals are turning more to online, social media content for skincare advice.

4.
PLoS One ; 17(9), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2029776

ABSTRACT

Background The incidence of colorectal cancer is rising in adults <50 years of age. As a primarily unscreened population, they may have clinically important delays to diagnosis and treatment. This study aimed to review the literature on delay intervals in patients <50 years with colorectal cancer (CRC), and explore associations between longer intervals and outcomes. Methods MEDLINE, Embase, and LILACS were searched until December 2, 2021. We included studies published after 1990 reporting any delay interval in adults <50 with CRC. Interval measures and associations with stage at presentation or survival were synthesized and described in a narrative fashion. Risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, Institute of Health Economics Case Series Quality Appraisal Checklist, and the Aarhus Checklist for cancer delay studies. Results 55 studies representing 188,530 younger CRC patients were included. Most studies used primary data collection (64%), and 47% reported a single center. Sixteen unique intervals were measured. The most common interval was symptom onset to diagnosis (21 studies;N = 2,107). By sample size, diagnosis to treatment start was the most reported interval (12 studies;N = 170,463). Four studies examined symptoms onset to treatment start (total interval). The shortest was a mean of 99.5 days and the longest was a median of 217 days. There was substantial heterogeneity in the measurement of intervals, and quality of reporting. Higher-quality studies were more likely to use cancer registries, and be population-based. In four studies reporting the relationship between intervals and cancer stage or survival, there were no clear associations between longer intervals and adverse outcomes. Discussion Adults <50 with CRC may have intervals between symptom onset to treatment start greater than 6 months. Studies reporting intervals among younger patients are limited by inconsistent results and heterogeneous reporting. There is insufficient evidence to determine if longer intervals are associated with advanced stage or worse survival. Other This study’s protocol was registered with the Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO;registration number CRD42020179707).

5.
Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences ; 7(2):145-155, 2022.
Article in Turkish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2026648

ABSTRACT

Many pandemic diseases have emerged in the history and millions of people affected from these diseases. Among the marked pandemics in history, the plague, known as the black death, was recorded to cause the death of 17-54% of the world population. Similar to previous pandemics, as the SARS CoV-2, which emerged in 2019 and belonged to the coronavirus family, caused an epidemic and turned into a pandemic infection, positive cases were detected in more than 483 million people, and more than 6.1 million people died. While this emerging epidemic is still continuing its effects, it has been determined that there are positive cases in pets such as dogs and cats, especially in mink (Neovison vison). Especially in Denmark, Netherlands and Finland, positive animals for COVID-19 were accepted. Unlike the pandemic until today, the COVID-19 has spread to broader geographies and affected many animal species. With the reports that the SARS-CoV-2 - was first transmitted from bats to humans, this viral agent has been accepted as zoonotic, but a complete transmission route has not been shown for its transmission from other animals to humans except bats. It is reported that there is no significant risk of transmission of the virus, which is transmitted primarily by the respiratory route, from both pets and edible foods to humans. Although there are many reports in terrestrial animals, studies on the presence of SARS-CoV-2 - in aquatic animals or aquatic environments and COVID-19 transmission in aquatic animals have doubts. Here we reviewed the viability of the SARS-CoV-2 - in the aquatic environment, transmission to the aquatic ecosystem and aquatic animals, and therefore the risks to humans through water or aquatic products.

6.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 19(17):10859, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2023708

ABSTRACT

The knowledge of long-term informal care is particularly interesting for social and health measures related to ageing. This study aims to analyze how Portugal differs from Denmark regarding long-term informal care, specifically referring to personal care received by older people. A cross-sectional study was developed in Portugal and Denmark through the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) in 2015, with a total of 2891 participants. Descriptive statistics and logistic regressions were performed. The findings suggest a significant association for older people from Portugal who receive long-term informal care from non-household caregivers and household caregivers. Moreover, as they age and are from Portugal, their availability to receive long-term informal care from non-household caregivers increases. Furthermore, older people in Portugal are more likely to receive long-term informal care from a household caregiver. It is important to take a closer look at long-term informal care in both countries and think about healthy ageing policies in the current context of the ageing population. This study provides knowledge about disaggregated health data on ageing in the European region, helping to fill research gaps related to older people.

7.
Foods ; 11(16):2437, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2023326

ABSTRACT

Gluten-free food products have been developed to satisfy the needs of consumers with celiac disease. However, there has been little research on the product feature development of sustainable gluten-free instant noodles through a qualitative study to explore the customer insights related to environmental attitude and purchase decision. Using a cross-national comparative study between Thai and Danish consumers, this study aims to (1) identify the target customer segments for each country;(2) explore the target customer segments regarding behaviours, desired outcomes, and pain points;and (3) suggest gluten-free instant noodle product prototypes suitable for each country. With a qualitative interview approach, 60 target customers (30 Thai and 30 Danish) were recruited to participate in this research. In addition, a thematic analysis was undertaken to examine their behaviours, desired outcomes, and pain points toward sustainable gluten-free instant noodle products. The findings revealed that convenience-oriented customers were the target segment of gluten-free instant noodle products in Thailand. This segment primarily focused on convenience as the main reason for consuming instant noodles and had common pain points in terms of taste. In contrast, environment-oriented customers were the target customer segment in Denmark. This segment consisted primarily of young women who eat less meat and shared common pain points such as difficulty accessing more sustainable options. Hence, there is a need to educate customers in Thailand (an emerging economy) and increase their awareness regarding environmental sustainability and consumption.

8.
Antibiotics ; 11(8):1050, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2023077

ABSTRACT

In the Nordic countries, antimicrobial use in animals and the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance are among the lowest in Europe. The network “Nordic Vets Against AMR” organized a meeting in 2021, with key actors including representatives from universities, veterinary authorities and veterinary organizations in Finland, Norway and Sweden. This paper reflects the most important discussions on education, research, policy and future perspectives, including the experiences of these countries. It concludes that Nordic veterinarians are well placed to lead the way in the fight against antimicrobial resistance and that the sharing of experiences can support colleagues in other countries. Veterinary education must go hand in hand with research activities and continuously updated guidelines and legislation. There is also a need for postgraduate training on antimicrobial resistance and prudent antimicrobial use. The veterinary profession must, by any means necessary, protect the efficiency of antimicrobials for the sake of animal health, animal welfare and productivity, as well as public health. While restrictive use of antimicrobials is crucial, the ability of veterinarians to use this medical tool is also important for the sake of animal welfare and global food security.

9.
Animals ; 12(16):2117, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2023063

ABSTRACT

Simple SummaryOwners of dogs, cats, and other companion animals increasingly make use of the internet to find out how to best care for their animals. This may affect owners’ relations with veterinarians in both positive and negative ways. A positive consequence could be that owners are better informed when they approach a veterinarian. However, there can also be challenging situations in which the owners may question veterinarians’ professional advice based on online information. Using a questionnaire, we found that a majority of Austrian, Danish, and UK veterinarians (n = 641) surveyed were occasionally confronted with clients who question their medical advice based on information obtained from the internet. In addition, the veterinarians were concerned about the potential for clients to misunderstand information found on the internet, or to develop unrealistic expectations of what is possible in small animal practices. As internet use becomes ever more widespread, we suggest that the types of resources that are available and used by animal owners should be further explored.Veterinary medicine is increasingly affected by animal owners having the opportunity to become better informed on pet health issues by using various internet resources. Using an online questionnaire including a section on clients’ use of internet resources to obtain medical information, this study aimed to investigate veterinarians’ estimates of the percentage of clients using internet resources, how often clients question veterinarians’ professional medical advice based on online information, and veterinarians’ attitudes towards clients’ use of internet resources, across Austrian, Danish, and UK veterinarians (n = 641). The results show that 48.8% of respondents estimated that 40–79% of their clients use internet resources to find medical information. Further, 70–80% of respondents stated that they are occasionally challenged by clients questioning their advice based on online information. Although veterinarians recognized the potential advantages related to clients’ use of internet resources, such as an increased acceptance of advanced diagnostics and treatments, they also highlighted clients’ increased expectations or false impressions of small animal practices as potentially negative aspects in this context. As internet use increases, it seems likely that these issues will become increasingly important in the future.

10.
Nordic Journal of Nursing Research ; 42(3):133-139, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2021083

ABSTRACT

Within the field of neurological disease, it seems that involvement of relatives is of utmost importance since the patients often are affected in several areas (physical, cognitive, and emotional) which impair their ability to participate in decision-making about their treatment and care. This study aimed to illuminate neuroscience nurses' comprehension of collaborating with and involvement of relatives. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 neuroscience registered nurses. The qualitative data were analyzed utilizing inductive thematic analysis. The COREQ checklist was applied. The analysis identified how collaboration with, and involvement of relatives are perceived as a focus for nursing care and a resource for both patients and registered nurses. Registered nurses having personal experience as a relative find it easier to establish a relationship with relatives. This study emphasizes the importance of the establishment of a trusting relationship between registered nurses and relatives for a positive collaboration and thus involvement of relatives.

11.
Journal of medical Internet research ; 24(8):e37223, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009805

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, video consultations became a common method of delivering care in general practice. To date, research has mostly studied acute or subacute care, thereby leaving a knowledge gap regarding the potential of using video consultations to manage chronic diseases. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine general practitioners' technology acceptance of video consultations for the purpose of managing type 2 diabetes in general practice. METHODS: A web-based survey based on the technology acceptance model measuring 4 dimensions-perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, attitude, and behavioral intention to use-was sent to all general practices (N=1678) in Denmark to elicit user perspectives. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. RESULTS: The survey sample comprised 425 general practitioners who were representative of the population. Structural equation modeling showed that 4 of the 5 hypotheses in the final research model were statistically significant (P<.001). Perceived ease of use had a positive influence on perceived usefulness and attitude. Attitude was positively influenced by perceived usefulness. Attitude had a positive influence on behavioral intention to use, although perceived usefulness did not. Goodness-of-fit indices showed acceptable fits for the structural equation modeling estimation. CONCLUSIONS: Perceived usefulness was the primary driver of general practitioners' positive attitude toward video consultations for type 2 diabetes care. The study suggests that to improve attitude and technology use, decision-makers should focus on improving usefulness, that is, how it can improve treatment and make it more effective and easier.

12.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases ; 81:135, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2009172

ABSTRACT

Background: In recent years the focus on healthy food and lifestyle has become a more important part of everyday life for many-with or without RMD. Many NGO-initiatives engaging citizens cooking and eating together has seen the light of day;people meet to talk, laugh and have a good time while making a healthy meal. The kitchen is an often discussed topic among the volunteers and members of The Danish Rheumatism Association. 'Simple' tasks as opening a can of beans or cutting bread can be complicated for people with RMDs. The fundamentals of cooking are different for this group of people;hence the idea of communities around 'arthritis friendly' food unfolded during fall 2019. Objectives: The main objective is to create 'food communities' for people with RMDs, helping them to get a better understanding of how to make 'arthritis friendly food', dispel the myth that it is expensive and hard, and to give them inspiration to better working positions with assistive devices-resulting in a healthier lifestyle which is important to keep the infammation low and the quality of life high. Methods: To obtain these objectives, a dietitian is facilitating 6 three hour 'courses' guiding the participants through healthy cooking-each course with a different theme/subject which is introduced through a short presentation. Two volunteers are responsible for booking kitchen facilities (often school kitchens which is free of charge), coordination with the dietitian and making sure everything runs smoothly and that the atmosphere is top-notch. An occupational therapist is joining the group one time to ensure optimal working positions and introducing and demonstrating assistive devices. One of our main goals is to create sustainable and longer lasting (more than 6 facilitated courses) communities, which is why an important part of the volunteer's responsibility is to initiate a talk about the opportunity of meeting without a dietitian. The 6 facilitated courses aim to give the group the ability to fnd recipes (provided by DRA) and being comfortable cooking with ingredients that the average Dane might not use very often. Furthermore, our assumption is that the group creates social bonds and therefore an interest in keeping these relations. Results: About twenty groups all around Denmark has been a part of the course so far. The feedback from the participants is extremely good-they feel they are learning in an inspiring environment while having a great time with their new acquaintances. Unfortunately, only one of the groups has become a community that exists after the facilitated courses. One of the reasons is, without a doubt, that most of the groups have been affected by different Covid-19 restrictions which has had an impact on the level of social bonding and feeling of ownership. But most participants feel that the dietitian is crucial for further engagement. Conclusion: The concept has been very successful in terms of creating a course that imparts useful knowledge about 'arthritis friendly' food and lifestyle for people with RMD's. It seems we need to make corrections to create the basis for sustainable communities;small changes that helps the group visualizing how to overcome the challenge of the absence of a dietitian, the logistics of grocery shopping for a group etc. We plan to leave out the dietitian from the ffth of the six courses to prepare the group to establish their own 'food community' with lots of healthy food, learning experiences and high spirit.

13.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases ; 81:114-115, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2008810

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may have impaired immu-nogenicity to COVID-19 vaccines. Objectives: To investigate the incidence of COVID-19 infection and hospitalisation in unvaccinated and vaccinated patients with RA compared with matched individuals;and secondarily in patients with RA according to DMARD treatment. Methods: Danish nationwide matched cohort study from January to October 2021. Patients with RA were identifed in DANBIO and matched 1:20 with individuals from the general population on age, sex, and vaccination status (month and exact type of vaccination). Primary and secondary outcomes were COVID-19 hospitalisation (Danish National Patient Register) and positive SARS-CoV2 PCR test (Danish COVID-19 Surveillance Register), respectively. Stratifed by vaccination status, incidence rates (IRs) per 1000 person years (PY) and comor-bidity-adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) in cause-specifc Cox models were calculated with 95% confdence intervals. Using the Aalen-Johansen estimator, the cumulative incidence of COVID-19 hospitalisations was visualised according to RA and vaccine exposure status. Results: Regardless of vaccination status, patients with RA had increased incidence of COVID-19 hospitalisation compared to matched individuals (Table 1). However, the absolute risk was 0.20% for unvaccinated patients at 60 days and 0.08% for comparators, whereas it remained below 0.05% at 180 days of follow-up in both groups when fully vaccinated (Figure 1). Increased SARS-CoV2 infection rates were seen only among unvacci-nated patients with RA (Table 1). Unadjusted analyses showed increased incidence of COVID-19 hospitalisation among rituximab-treated compared with conventional DMARD treated: unvaccinated HR 4.71 (1.98 to 11.18) and vaccinated HR 11.69 (2.07 to 66.06). However, the proportions of patients with previous cancer and treated with prednisolone were higher among the rituximab treated. Conclusion: The incidence of COVID-19 hospitalisation was increased for both unvaccinated and vaccinated patients with RA compared with controls. Importantly, the parallel decreasing risk for patients with RA suggests a comparable relative beneft of vaccination. Less favourable outcomes among rituximab-treated warrant that this drug should be considered with extra care.

14.
BMJ : British Medical Journal (Online) ; 378, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2001818

ABSTRACT

With WHO declaring monkeypox a public health emergency of international concern, Mun-Keat Looi explains the current state of the global outbreak

15.
Journal of Cinema and Media Studies ; 61(4):18-21, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1998990

ABSTRACT

[...]the S-SIG has helped nurture long-term collaborations and supportive academic friendships. Nordic film and media scholarship ventures far beyond the traditional concerns of regionally focused cinema studies. [...]SSIG members have pioneered areas of intense scholarly interest, including Mette Hjort's groundbreaking research on the cinemas of small nations;Eva Novrup Redvall's influential contributions to multiplatform television industry studies;Pietari Kääpä's innovative global green production initiative;and Scott MacKenzie and Anna Westerståhl Stenport's research on Arctic Indigenous cinemas, [t] r#Nii S-SIG members have additionally revitalized timeworn research areas. While the S-SIG seeks to undermine assumptions about Nordic media studies and support its members' versatility, SCMS conference programming continues to privilege submissions on amply researched male directors (e.g., Tars von Trier and Ingmar Bergman) and the same few noir texts (such as Forbrydelsen and Broen). [...]we have adopted multiple strategies to support work beyond such well-covered topics, such as by contributing Bihttoš (Rebel 2015)-Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers's experimental documentary exploring her Blackfoot and Sámi heritage-to an SCMS Indigenous cinema event our SIG co-hosted in Toronto in 2018.

16.
Social Science & Medicine ; : 115276, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1996560

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to investigate the potential protective role of baseline resources and capabilities for experiencing challenges to emotional well-being and perceived access to and quality of diabetes care during the COVID-19 pandemic in a Danish type 2 diabetes population (N = 1608). We investigated how differences in self-efficacy, well-being capability, socioeconomic status, health status, and perceptions of diabetes care measured before the COVID-19 pandemic were related to experiences of well-being and diabetes management challenges during the pandemic. The study is based on a survey conducted shortly before the pandemic (autumn 2019) and a follow-up survey during the pandemic (autumn 2020), which included questions about impacts of the pandemic. We used this longitudinal data to quantitatively investigate in regression analyses how self-reported baseline indicators of chronic care access and quality (PACIC), self-efficacy (GSE), health (EQ VAS), and well-being capability (ICECAP-A), and registry-based socioeconomic indicators were associated with the probability of reporting negative impacts on emotional wellbeing and diabetes management. Results showed that respondents with higher baseline general self-efficacy and higher well-being capability scores, who more often considered care well-organised and were in better health before the pandemic, were less likely to report pandemic-related negative impacts on emotional well-being. Considering diabetes care well organised before the pandemic was associated with a lower probability of adverse impacts on diabetes care. The results thus broadly confirmed that several indicators of higher levels of baseline resources and capabilities were associated with a lower probability of reporting negative impacts of the pandemic. However, some variation in predictors was observed for general well-being outcomes, compared to diabetes-care specific challenges, and findings on socioeconomic status as indicated by education were mixed.

17.
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being ; 17(1): 2113021, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1991956

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: It is well known that being a family caregiver of a palliative patient in general is rewarding as well as burdensome. The COVID-19 pandemic may have exacerbated this situation. We therefore explored the significance of the COVID-19 pandemic for family caregivers of non-COVID-19 patients in need of specialized palliative care at home. METHODS: Open-ended, semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 15 family caregivers of patients treated by a specialized palliative outpatient unit in a Danish hospital. Interviews were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: Four themes concerning the significance of the COVID-19 pandemic were identified: 1) being a family caregiver of a patient whose lifespan is already limited, 2) dealing with the risk of passing on COVID-19 oneself, 3) dealing with the risk of others passing on COVID-19 to the patient at home, and 4) living with modified specialized palliative care. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic had a radical impact on some family caregivers causing emotional despair. They feared not only infecting the patient with SARS-CoV-2 to cause an untimely death but also being unable to be there for the patient during hospitalization, especially in the patient's final days.

18.
Acta Paediatr ; 111(9): 1695-1700, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1985647

ABSTRACT

AIM: Our aim was to investigate the rates of preterm births, live births and stillbirths in Denmark during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This was a national, cross-sectional registry-based study that used the Danish Newborn Quality database, which covers all births in Denmark. The proportions of preterm births were compared between the COVID-19 pandemic period of 1 March 2020 to 28 February 2021 and the preceding 4-year pre-pandemic period. RESULTS: We studied 60 323 and 244 481 newborn infants from the pandemic and pre-pandemic periods, respectively. The proportion of preterm live births and stillbirths declined slightly, from 6.29% during the pre-pandemic period to 6.02% during the pandemic period. This corresponded to a relative risk (RR) of 0.96, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.93-0.99 during the pandemic. The RRs for extremely preterm, very preterm and moderately preterm infants were 0.88 (95% CI 0.76-1.02), 0.91 (95% CI 0.82-1.02) and 0.97 (95% CI 0.93-1.01), respectively. CONCLUSION: This comparative study showed a small reduction in just over 4%, from 6.29 to 6.02% in the proportion of all preterm births during the pandemic period, compared with the previous four pandemic-free years. There were no differences between subcategories of preterm births.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Premature Birth , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Databases, Factual , Denmark/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , Live Birth/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Registries , Stillbirth/epidemiology
19.
ASHRAE Transactions ; 128:472-479, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1970765

ABSTRACT

Increasing demands for sustainable design solutions have fostered a myriad of certification systems (GxN and Danish Building Research Institute, 2018). Sustainability certification systems quantify designs based on predefined criteria and are gaining momentum due to market demand. The DGNB assessment methodology is widely used in the Danish building industry today (Green Building Council Denmark, 2021). An aim of the current Danish climate strategy is to reduce greenhouse gases by 70% from 1990 levels by 2030. As part of this strategy, the Danish Government introduced the voluntary sustainability class (VSC) in May 2020 to be included in Danish Building Regulations by 2023. The VSC will be optional until 2023, and after 2023 it will become a mandatory part of the Danish Building Regulations (Bolig og Planstyrelsen, 2021). The VSC could serve as a central element in the transition of the building industry towards sustainable buildings and urban designs. The present study adopts a multi-level perspective (MLP), which is a transition framework. The VSC is an example of how a macro-level change, such as the green transition brought about by climate change, can aid in the transition to increased sustainability in a socio-technical system (Geels, 2002). Semi-structured interviews with experts from the construction industry were conducted to shed light on the potential,possibilities and challenges associated with the new regulation;however, the present study did not consider whether amending the Danish Building Regulations could increase the sustainability of buildingprojects. The results showed that certain factors, such as knowledge and prior experience of regulatory changes, could lessen the impact of any future change in regulations. In relation to the effect of the voluntary sustainability programme, the present study showed that the programme is most likely to target companies with a lower level of ambition regarding sustainable initiatives.

20.
BMJ Open ; 12(6), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1968299

ABSTRACT

Objective To study the association between behavioural factors and incidence rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Design Case-control web-based questionnaire study. Setting Questionnaire data were collected in the Capital Region of Denmark in December 2020 when limited restrictions were in place, while the number of daily SARS-CoV-2 cases increased rapidly. Participants 8913 cases of laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were compared with two groups of controls: (1) 34 063 individuals with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test from the same date (negative controls, NCs) and 2) 25 989 individuals who had never been tested for a SARS-CoV-2 infection (untested controls, UC). Controls were matched on sex, age, test date and municipality. Exposure Activities during the 14 days prior to being tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 or during the same period for matched controls and precautions taken during the entire pandemic. Main outcomes and measures SARS-CoV-2 infection incidence rate ratios (IRR). Results Response rate was 41.4% (n=93 121). Using public transportation, grocery shopping (IRR: NC: 0.52;UC: 0.63) and outdoor sports activities (NC: 0.75;UC: 0.96) were not associated with increased rate of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Most precautions, for example, using hand sanitizer (NC: 0.79;UC: 0.98), physical distancing (NC: 0.79;UC: 0.82) and avoiding handshakes (NC: 0.74;UC: 0.77), were associated with a lower rate of infection. Activities associated with many close contacts, especially indoors, increased rate of infection. Except for working from home, all types of occupation were linked to increased rate of infection. Conclusions In a community setting with moderate restrictions, activities such as using public transportation and grocery shopping with the relevant precautions were not associated with an increased rate of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Exposures and activities where safety measures are difficult to maintain might be important risk factors for infection. These findings may help public health authorities tailor their strategies for limiting the spread of SARS-CoV-2.

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