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1.
International Journal of Emergency Services ; JOUR
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2097557

ABSTRACT

Purpose This study aims to identify levels of gender perception specific to disaster management process and gender-related factors among the health workers employed at can State Hospital, Turkey. Design/methodology/approach The study was carried out with a survey form consisting of 41 questions created by researchers with 207 health workers working at can State Hospital and by means of face-to-face interview technique. SPSS ver. 19.0 statistics software package was used in the research for analysis of data. Findings Of the participants, 70.24% had experienced a disaster before;88.03% reported that women and men were equally affected by disasters and 72.94% reported that women and men were equally affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The majority of the participants (70.29%) reported that the COVID-19 pandemic affected health workers of both genders equally. The health workers who consider that the disaster legislation is gender-sensitive, who have attended any disaster response training and who consider that women are included in the fragile/vulnerable group in disaster response activities have been found out to have significantly higher gender perception scores specific to disaster management process (p < 0.05). Most of the participants stated that both genders were affected equally by the disasters they experienced, which manifests that they adopted an egalitarian approach. Practical implications This study revealed the importance of providing disaster training for health workers to improve the gender perceptions. It is of high significance to integrate gender into the disaster trainings. Originality/value This study identifies and evaluates health workers' disaster-specific perceptions of gender, and necessary response activities can be performed accordingly.

2.
Sustainability ; 14(19):12441, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066411

ABSTRACT

The risk of frequent disasters is becoming a huge challenge for enterprises and their supply chains. In particular, sudden global public health events have brought a great test to the supply chain. How to make sustainable planning and preparedness and smoothly carry out supply chain operations and obtain sustainable firm performance in the complex market environment requires urgent attention from industries and academia. The different effects of supply chain operational capability and dynamic capability on the long-term performance and short-term performance of enterprises are still unclear;therefore, a model was established to discuss this. Based on the theory of dynamic capability, a relational model between supply chain dynamic capability, supply chain operational capability, and firm performance was constructed, a hypothesis testing method and Amos software were used to verify the set model, and the mechanisms of supply chain dynamic capability and supply chain operational capability on firm performance were discussed. The empirical results show that supply chain operational capability has a mediating effect on supply chain dynamic capability and firm performance, and supply chain dynamic capability has a moderating impact on supply chain operational capability and firm performance. The supply chain and its enterprises should cultivate and continuously improve the supply chain dynamic capability as soon as possible, so that in the face of emergencies, the supply chain operation capability can be reasonably configured to avoid damage, improve firm performance, and gain competitive advantages.

3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066057

ABSTRACT

Although disaster research has acknowledged the role of social media in crisis communication, the interplay of new (e.g., mobile apps) and traditional media (e.g., TV, radio) in public warnings has received less attention, particularly from the recipients' perspective. Therefore, we examined sociodemographic and psychosocial correlates of different types of media use (i.e., traditional, new, mixed) for receiving public warning messages in a population survey (N = 613, 63% female; Mage = 31.56 years). More than two-thirds (68%) reported mixed media use, with 20% relying on new media and 12% on traditional media. Traditional media users were older and reported lower levels of education, while new media users were significantly younger and reported lower trust toward traditional media (i.e., TV). Migrants were more likely to use new but not mixed media. In sum, most participants utilized a mixture of traditional and new media for warning purposes, which has implications for crisis communication. Though, vulnerable populations (e.g., older and less educated participants) mainly rely on traditional media, stressing the need for continued support. Thus, it is paramount to increasingly use mixed methods designs and concurrently examine multiple channels to reflect real-world warning practices and generate ecologically valid results.


Subject(s)
Disasters , Social Media , Communication , Female , Humans , Male , Mass Media , Trust
4.
The International Journal of Sustainability in Economic, Social and Cultural Context ; 18(1):85-100, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2056691

ABSTRACT

The issue of human nature has not been limited in discussing disaster management during these days. This research aims to examine how human nature has been applied to the field to mitigate the various impacts of disasters. Qualitative content analysis, including inference and thematic layers, is used as the main method in comparing the arbitrariness-based with the duality-based aspect of human nature in terms of international organizations, developed nations, and developing nations. The key finding is that these stakeholders need to shift from the arbitrariness-based to the duality-based aspect. Such transition may lead to embracing effective disaster management, multiple emergency plans, self- and public awareness, psychological support, behavior change, diversity, and education. As a multidisciplinary study, this research comprehensively analyzes the contents of human nature within disaster management.

5.
Front Public Health ; 10: 975667, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055095

ABSTRACT

Background: In the context of a holistic and comprehensive disaster response effort to the COVID-19 pandemic, many countries across the globe mobilized their military forces in order to cope with sudden and exponential surges of critically ill patients with COVID-19 in stretched healthcare systems. Objective: The purpose of this work is to identify, map, and render world-wide key concepts of civil-military cooperation (CIMIC) in disaster management during the COVID-19 crisis visible. Material and methods: Literature was systematically searched in three databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library) on 26 January 2022, and analyzed with qualitative, mixed narrative-phenomenological methods in compliance with PRISM-ScR and SRQR. Results: Forty-five publications were included in the analysis; pertinent authors were from 22 countries covering five continents. We identified three key thematic clusters in the published literature: Cluster (1) Medico-scientific contributions with the participation of military medical personnel or institutions: members of the military acted as subject matter experts, clinical and experimental (co-) investigators as well as co-founders for enabling COVID-19 relevant research. Areas covered were relevant to the COVID-19 patient's clinical journey from prevention, exposure, diagnostics, and treatment and included pertinent fields such as digital health and telemedicine, global and public health, critical care, emergency and disaster medicine, radiology, neurology, as well as other medical specialties, i.e., respiratory care, pulmonology, burn medicine, and transfusion medicine, in addition to environmental and occupational sciences as well as materials science. Cluster (2) CIMIC field experiences or analyses included areas such as political framework, strategy, structure, nature of civil-military interaction, and concrete mission reports in selected countries. Themes covered a broad spectrum of pandemic disaster management subjects such as capacity and surge capacity building, medical and pharmaceutical logistics, patient care under austere circumstances, SARS-CoV-2 testing support, intelligent and innovative information management, vaccination support, and disaster communication. Cluster (3) The military as a role model for crisis management. Conclusion: Civil-military cooperation made a significant contribution to the level of resilience in crisis management on a global scale, positively impacting a broad spectrum of core abilities during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disasters , Military Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pharmaceutical Preparations , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Community Appl Soc Psychol ; 2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2047492

ABSTRACT

In the face of the first wave of COVID-19 contagion, citizens all over the world experienced concerns for their safety and health, as well as prolonged lockdowns - which brought about limitations but also unforeseen opportunities for personal growth. Broad variability in these psychological responses to such unprecedented experiences emerged. This study addresses this variability by investigating the role of personal and community resilience. Personal resilience, collective resilience, community disaster management ability, provided information by local authorities, and citizens' focus on COVID-19-related personal concerns and lockdown-related opportunities for personal growth were detected through an online questionnaire. Multilevel modelling was run with data from 3,745 Italian citizens. The potential of personal resilience as a driver for individuals to overcome adverse situations with positive outcomes was confirmed. Differently, the components of community resilience showed more complex paths, highlighting the need to pay more attention to its role in the face of far-reaching adverse events which hardly test individuals' as well as communities' adaptability and agency skills. The complexities linked to the multi-component and system-specific nature of resilience, as well as potential paths towards making the most out of citizens' and communities' ones, emerge. The theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

7.
Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism ; : 1-26, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2042461

ABSTRACT

This multiple case study investigates internal crisis communication in Finnish and Norwegian hotels and restaurants during the COVID-19 pandemic, contributing a Nordic leadership perspective to the research area. Due to the exploratory nature of the study, a qualitative research design was chosen, and 16 semi-structured interviews were conducted with hospitality leaders, middle managers, and employees. The multilevel analysis revealed that existing internal communication practices were challenged due to the urgency and uncertainty of the crisis. The findings show that managerial transparency and presence facilitated sensemaking processes and contributed to trust in the managers. Yet, limited autonomy among middle managers and lack of employee consultation when communicating about decision-making indicated a conflict between internal crisis communication and aspects of Nordic leadership such as cooperation, consensus-seeking, and delegation of responsibility. However, the findings suggest that the openness and transparency of Nordic leadership prevailed in the crisis and contributed to managerial learning and solution-finding through crisis communication and management. Furthermore, leaders should find a balance between control and participation when communicating about internal decision-making during a crisis. We conclude that transparency and participative communication are essential when striving for effective internal crisis communication, facilitating employees' sensemaking, and building trust relationships during a crisis.

8.
International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction ; 81:103312, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2041806

ABSTRACT

Due to its real-time and human-centered nature, social media posts have been widely applied to provide rapid situational awareness in disasters, particularly from a human-centered perspective. To generalize social media-derived insights on a population, a pre-requisite is that the employed social media posts are capable of revealing the information of disaster-affected population without bias. Such wide application and pre-requisite underscore the importance of investigating social media bias for deriving reliable decision support insights in disaster management. However, a systematic framework that streamlines the investigation of social media representation bias is still missing. To address the research gap, we propose a framework comprising (1) the setting of an appropriate representation bias benchmark;(2) the modeling of the sampling uncertainty of social media-derived insights;and (3) the derivation and quantification of representation bias distribution across races/ethnicities. Public transit amid COVID-19 in the United States is studied for illustration purposes. Nation-level results show that the White group is over-represented, the Asian group is slightly over-represented, and the Hispanic and Black groups are under-represented throughout the studied period. The level of social media representation bias varies across the states of California, New York, Texas, and Florida, and it is inversely correlated with population ratios. Such findings are beneficial for decision-makers to use social media to derive reliable insights into disaster-affected population, thereby making informed operational decisions accordingly.

9.
Revista de Gestão Social e Ambiental ; 16(1):1-19, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2040620

ABSTRACT

Objetivo: Discutir como as vulnerabilidades, principalmente no que tange as desigualdades sočiais, estäo atreladas aos desastres e como elas se potencializam diante da ocorrencia dos mesmos, agravando ainda mais a situaçâo de grupos e comunidades em condiçöes de fragilidade. Referencial Teórico: O desastre do rompimento da barragem da Vale foi analisado a partir da proposta de Gestäo de Riscos de Desastres (GRD) apresentada pelo Sendai Framework, que se baseia no fortalecimento de açöes e medidas de prevençâo de desastres, bem como no aumento a preparaçâo para respostas e recuperaçâo diante de desastres que possam vir a ocorrer. Metodologia/abordagem: O método utilizado foi o estudo de caso. Foram realizadas pesquisas documentais, observaçâo participante de grupos de WhatsApp e tres entrevistas com representantes do setor público e da sociedade civil, além de sete entrevistas com cidadäos de Brumadinho. A análise de conteúdo foi a estratégia para análise dos dados. Principais resultados: A experiencia do municipio de Brumadinho demonstra como a recuperaçâo de um desastre é difícil de ser realizada e torna ainda mais vulnerável e exposta ao risco a populaçâo atingida, potencializando fragilidades e desigualdades. Implicates da pesquisa: A situaçâo da cidade mineira evidencia a construçâo processual dos desastres e como o atual modelo de desenvolvimento económico e produtivo precisa ser repensado. As criticas a gestâo do desastre e a negligencia quanto a sua prevençâo podem servir para nortear decisőes do poder público no sentido de desenvolver açöes de prevençâo e reduçâo de danos. Originalidade/valor: Estudos empíricos que discutam a relaçâo entre desastres, vulnerabilidades e desigualdades sociais sâo fundamentais para se obter uma melhor compreensâo sobre complexidade que envolve a gestâo de desastres, e, principalmente, mostrar como as desigualdades sâo potencializadas a partir da ocorrencia de eventos dessa magnitude, agravando ainda mais a situaçâo de grupos e comunidades em condiçöes de fragilidade O artigo também contribui para a literatura da área na medida em que analisa os efeitos de superposiçâo de desastres - rompimento de barragem e pandemia - na populaçâo mais vulnerável.Alternate :Objective: To discuss how vulnerabilities, especially in terms of social inequalities, are linked to disasters and how they become more potent when disasters occur, further aggravating the situation of groups and communities in fragile conditions. Theoretical framework: The Vale dam failure disaster was analyzed from the Disaster Risk Management (DRM) proposal presented by the Sendai Framework, which is based on strengthening actions and measures to prevent disasters, as well as increasing preparedness for responses and recovery from disasters that may occur. Methodology/approach: The method used was the case study. Documentary research, participant observation of WhatsApp groups, and three interviews with representatives of the public sector and civil society were conducted, as well as seven interviews with citizens of Brumadinho. Content analysis was the strategy for data analysis. Main Results: The experience of the municipality of Brumadinho demonstrates how recovery from a disaster is difficult to accomplish and makes the affected population even more vulnerable and exposed to risk, potentiating fragilities and inequalities. Implications of the research: The situation of the city in Minas Gerais highlights the processual construction of disasters and how the current model of economic and productive development needs to be rethought. The criticism of disaster management and the negligence regarding its prevention can serve to guide decisions by the public authorities to develop prevention and damage reduction actions. Originality/value: Empirical studies that discuss the relationship between disasters, vulnerabilities and social inequalities are fundamental to obtain a better understanding of the complexity involved in disaster management, and es ecially to show how inequalities are enhanced by the occurrence of events of this magnitude, further aggravating the situation of groups and communities in fragile conditions.

10.
IOP Conference Series. Earth and Environmental Science ; 1082(1):012021, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2037344

ABSTRACT

Flood is acknowledged as the most common natural disaster in several parts of the globe. For Malaysia, flood is considered as the most frequent natural disaster, with the frequency of at least once a year. The risks of flood can be seen through property loss and damages, infrastructure casualties, and disruption to socio-economic activities. Adding to that, Malaysia also faced the flood during the pandemic when it hit several states, namely Pahang, Johor, and Kelantan, during the monsoon season in 2020 and 2021, amid the rising cases of Covid-19. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has posed significant challenges for disaster response, calling for the “new norms” to be quickly established for better disaster risk reduction. Several mitigation strategies have been taken by the government to reduce the risks of floods in Malaysia. As office buildings possess important roles in delivering effective services to the public while maintaining their critical documents, this paper focuses on providing related literature on building resilience. Having an early understanding of the core elements of office building resilience in dual disaster challenges will provide the basis for further investigation in the later stage of data collection.

11.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-343356

ABSTRACT

The present coronavirus crisis caused major worldwide disruption which has not been experienced for decades. The lockdown-based crisis management was implemented by nearly all the countries, and studies confirming lockdown effectiveness can be found alongside with the studies questioning it. In this work, we have performed a narrative review of the works studying the above effectiveness, as well as the historic experience of previous pandemics and risk-benefit analysis based on the connection of health and wealth. Our aim was to learn lessons and analyze ways to improve the management of similar events in the future. The comparative analysis of different countries showed that the assumption of lockdowns’ effectiveness cannot be supported by evidence – neither regarding the present COVID-19 pandemic, nor regarding the 1918-1920 Spanish Flu and other less-severe pandemics in the past. The price tag of lockdowns in terms of public health is high: by using the known connection of health and wealth, we estimate that lockdowns may claim 20 times more life years that they save. It is suggested therefore that a thorough cost-benefit analysis should be performed before imposing any lockdown for either COVID-19 or any future pandemic.

12.
Health in Emergencies & Disasters Quarterly ; 6(3):147-160, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2026570

ABSTRACT

Background: Sharing experiences and learning from health measures taken during the outbreak of epidemics is a critical issue that affects the right and timely decisions in health crises. In the present study, an attempt has been made to review the health policies adopted against COVID-19 and extract critical points for resolving the epidemic crisis. Materials and Methods: This article was a comparative study. The study population comprised Canada, Japan, Germany, Korea, Turkey, and Iran. Ten effective indicators in the management of epidemics were extracted by reviewing the literature and interviewing disaster management experts, and the degree of conformity of the research community with them was examined. The study data were collected from articles published in scientific databases (Google Scholar, PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus search engines) or information from COVID-19 disease management organizations from official sites. The obtained data were processed and analyzed by matrix content analysis. Results: The results showed the importance of 10 effective indicators in the management of epidemics during the outbreak of COVID-19 studied and noticed by the health system of most countries. And the government, local and private organizations have participated in the implementation of the studied indicators according to the conditions of each country's health system. Therefore, the success rate of countries in managing COVID-19 disease varies according to the time, type, and manner of implementation and monitoring of measures. Conclusion: Speed of action in adopting health policies and integration in its implementation, construction of convalescence, adequate training and access to personal protective equipment, prevention of nosocomial contamination, and voluntary assistance are essential issues in the fight against epidemics. These measures should be considered and used as teachings in managing health crises, especially emerging diseases and pandemics. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

13.
Sustainability ; 14(16):10254, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024147

ABSTRACT

Since dust and flammable gas are generated during the waste recycling process, there is always a risk of a fire accident. However, research on disaster management at recycling facilities deals only with the problem of processing systems from a technical standpoint and does not suggest concrete alternatives from a management aspect. Therefore, this study analyzed the influence of the disaster response network of a Waste of Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) recycling center at the organizational level based on the concept of the cognitive accuracy of a network considering administrative aspects. Accordingly, a survey was conducted using a structured questionnaire targeting 47 employees at the WEEE recycling center in South Korea and by applying the two-mode network analysis method using UCINET software, the centrality of the actor and the density of the network were quantitatively analyzed. Through this analysis, we confirmed that factors affecting the influence of the network exist, such that the entire network and the networks of different levels of position are different. We suggest that this can be improved by deploying safety and health management managers who perform formal tasks at the center of the network so that everyone can agree on the political approach and by empowering the safety and health management manager to conduct active education and training. Furthermore, we suggest that the network structure should be reorganized, centering on the person in charge of safety and health management to have a network system that matches each position.

14.
Disaster Advances ; 15(8):60-68, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2012623

ABSTRACT

It is now widely known that the hazards can be natural, but most disasters are ‘human-made’. The failure to properly implement developmental policies and practices with due consideration to disaster risk management is the leading cause of turning a hazard into a disaster.25 This, in return, negatively affects sustainable development which ultimately affects the weakest and the poorest sections of society. Disaster impacts have been felt on a wide range of sectors and sections of the population. They are curbing progress made toward achieving the Sendai Framework targets, and SDGs. Climate and human-induced disaster events have exposed several underlying facets of risks' systemic and cascading nature. There is an urgent need to identify, analyse and better understand the multi-hazard, systemic and cascading nature of the disaster and climate risks, their inter-linkages, and interplay. A holistic understanding of risk is crucial for furthering the priorities of action laid under the Sendai Framework and the envisioned SDGs and ensuring a better, greener, resilient and sustainable society. We have tried to study the disaster management frameworks, plans and policies of 10 countries including India to understand the institutional mechanisms and integration of critical aspects of dual/multi disaster scenarios. When the traditional disasters hit the community following the COVID-19 pandemic, the need arises to have an integrated model that can assisting in the preparation and response to the dual situation simultaneously. Efforts are made to put the experiences into a framework for an integrated approach preparing for dual/multi-disaster scenarios. © 2022, World Research Association. All rights reserved.

15.
Comparative Sociology ; 21(4):373, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2012198

ABSTRACT

At the onset of the COVID-19 epidemic, world leaders introduced face masking and tactical urbanism aimed at reducing physical contacts. The goal of these measures, as argued by the proponents, is to curtail community transmission of the virus to enable herd immunity. The enforcement of these measures attracted contradictions related to human rights and citizen duty. In the Global North, the rising cases of COVID-19 have been linked to resistance to regulations aimed at containing the virus. Predominantly, the younger generation perceive these measures as infringements on their freedoms and rights. Conversely, in the Global South, the implementation of COVID-19 measures has been marred by instances of human rights violations and extra-judicial killings in extreme cases. There are reported cases of arbitrary arrests, battery, and extortions consequent upon the enforcement of physical distancing and use of face masks. The paradox of the differential experiences between the Global North and South informed this article. Relying on extant literature and Procedural Justice Theory, the authors submit that rights and duties are not mutually exclusive, but can be blended through a proactive participatory process within a democratic framework. The article recommends a multi-level legislative framework for disaster management.

16.
Pediatrics ; 149, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003458

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic presented unique challenges to pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) departments nationwide. The purpose of this study was to identify these challenges and ascertain how centers overcame barriers in creating solutions to continue to provide high-quality care while keeping their workforce safe. Methods: This is a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with PEM physicians in leadership positions within their institution's COVID-19 response or emergency/disaster management departments. Participants were identified through convenient purposive sampling. Demographic data was captured in a pre-interview survey. Interviews were recorded and transcribed electronically. Themes and codes were extracted from the transcripts by two independent coders. Constant comparison analysis was performed until thematic saturation was achieved. Member checking was completed to ensure trustworthiness of the results. Results: Fourteen PEM-trained physicians participated in this study. Eleven of the participants received specialized disaster management training, and ten are directors of their institutions' emergency/disaster management departments. Communication, leadership and planning, clinical practice, and personal adaptations were the principal themes identified. Within these themes, participants discussed challenges and offered examples as to how they overcame them within their department and their larger institution. To improve communication and disseminate new information, departments might consider shift huddles, town hall meetings, limiting the number of daily emails, and highlighting the newest changes. During traumas and resuscitations, “gatekeepers” oversee who goes into the trauma bay, and technology should be utilized to communicate with the team outside. For leadership and planning, the emergency department should appoint leaders to summarize updates and attend incident command meetings. Institutions should consider developing containment units and having multiple vendors for key supplies as part of their pandemic plans. Business continuity plans should be updated regularly as part of pandemic preparedness. Hospitals should be prepared to utilize telehealth and accept adult patients if pediatric volumes drop. Recommendations regarding adjusting clinical practice include having clear guidelines for what constitutes an aerosol-generating procedure, drive-through testing sites to alleviate pressure on emergency centers, and performing triage in the patient's room if possible. Personal protective equipment (PPE) should be safely re-purposed if supplies are insufficient. Staff must be trained on the proper donning and doffing of PPE with regular reminders during prolonged pandemics. Transparency with the workforce regarding supplies, testing, and safety protocols help alleviate fear and anxiety. Medical caregivers can limit their exposure by utilizing cardiac monitors visible from outside patient rooms and providing updates via telephone in patient rooms. For a full list of challenges and recommendations, see Table 1. Conclusion: By sharing COVID-19 experiences and offering solutions to commonly encountered problems nationwide, pediatric emergency centers and their institutions may better prepare both themselves and one another for future pandemics.

17.
SciDev.net ; 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1999633

ABSTRACT

Speed read UN report shows clear links between global disasters Lack of risk management and climate change among common causes Tackling root causes across disciplines is essential, report says Extreme events are increasingly compounding each other, even if they initially seem wide apart and unconnected, making it more crucial to tackle their root causes, says a report. In turn, deforestation is linked to Western demand for meat, and has a knock-on effect on climate change, exacerbating extreme events elsewhere in the world, says the report. Need to strengthen Strengthening networks for sharing prevention and response experiences between countries, and mechanisms for international cooperation and allocation of funds, is critical says Tran Si Pha, head of the disaster management department at the Vietnam Red Cross Society.

18.
SciDev.net ; 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1998692

ABSTRACT

Speed read Global health leaders, non-profits call on WHO leadership to review funding Member States urged to pay higher contributions to safeguard global health Consensus must be reached before World Health Assembly in May - UN health strategist A key meeting of the WHO’s executive board has spawned an upswell of calls to overhaul the UN agency’s funding, with leaders saying failure to invest in global health left the world ill-prepared for the COVID-19 “tsunami of suffering”. A letter signed by a host of leaders including Helen Clark and Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, co-chairs of the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response, and Gordon Brown, WHO Ambassador for Global Health Financing, decried the world’s “ailing approach to investing in global public health, and universal health coverage”, laid bare by the COVID-19 pandemic. Congratulations @DrTedros nominated for a second term as DG. @WHO is the only global normative & technical health agency and it needs sustainable financing to deliver on its huge mandate. https://t.co/IbTBE8gyOG — Soumya Swaminathan (@doctorsoumya) January 25, 2022 Lawrence Gostin, director of the WHO Collaborating Center on National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University, in the US, told SciDev.Net that the WHO’s budget was “wholly incommensurate with its global responsibilities”.

19.
Gender in Management ; 37(7):836-857, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1992484

ABSTRACT

Purpose>This study aims to develop a perception scale of gender role in disaster management and examine related factors.Design/methodology/approach>A total of 1,167 individuals were reached in the main trial. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were applied to test the validity of the final scale form, respectively.Findings>The scale was developed as unidimensional with two positive items and 17 negative items. The mean scores of the participants were in the positive perception group. The 19-item model is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring the perception of gender role specific to disaster management.Practical implications>Determining the perceptions of the people will guide the policies related to gender equity and equality and activities to be carried out in the disaster management field. This tool can be used to raise awareness related to gender perceptions in the disaster preparedness activities.Originality/value>The “Perception Scale of Gender Role in Disaster Management” which is a reliable and robust tool to determine the perception of gender role specific to the disaster management was developed in this study. This tool can contribute to address the needs and capacities and provide influencive strategy development through gender analysis.

20.
Current Politics and Economics of South, Southeastern, and Central Asia ; 31(1):55-81, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1989639

ABSTRACT

The area of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) comprises approximately 4.5 million km2 with a population of around 650 million people as one of the areas inhabited by diverse ethnic groups with the highest economic growth in the world and one of the busiest ports in the world. Thus, the movement of people in ASEAN region is considered relatively high. Therefore, ASEAN region would inevitably become the traffic for growth of numerous communicable diseases caused by viruses, bacteria or parasites, including COVID-19. The spread of this communicable disease could take place from an endemic phase to Public Health Emergency of International Concern. Therefore, the spread of this communicable disease could not be easily disregarded as such matter is not solely related to the ongoing serious public health problems due to its mass casualties, but it has brought social and economic multidimensional adverse effects in life as well as causing crises with the enactment of lockdown policies to hinder its spread significantly. The article in this CHAPTER shall discuss how ASEAN deals with the COVID-19 pandemic and how it adapts its disaster management mechanisms with its existing bureaucracy, including the challenges and obstacles in finding a solution for the pandemic and to revive the economic growth.

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