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1.
Journal of Forensic Medicine Science and Law ; JOUR(1):90-95, 31.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2084188

ABSTRACT

Background: Doctors, nurses, and paramedics are mistreated by impatient patients having prejudice, hatred and unruly behaviour. The recent COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted hate speech and hostility against healthcare professionals and workers. Objectives: To identify reasons for the abuse and violence. To examine the statutory provisions and judicial interpretations about protecting the rights of the healthcare professionals against hate speech, abuse and violence by the patients and their near relatives. To identify the shortcomings in the existing legal framework. Methods: Analysing and reviewing of research papers, articles, judgments, statistical studies, and news reports that are related to hate speech, abuse and violence against doctors and healthcare workers in the past ten years in India. Results: Although some states have legislated exclusive law about the present issue, instances of abuse, and violence have not been reduced, rather increased as seen after the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, there is a lack of deterrence in the existing penal law. Conclusion: Physicians who are victimised face a special kind of occupational vulnerability. Because general physicians work in a variety of therapeutic settings, the possibility of violence, hate speech, hostility is a legitimate issue. Because of the huge emotional, psychological, and financial implications of violence, it is a concern not for policy makers alone, but for everyone. © 2022, Medicolegal Association of Maharashtra. All rights reserved.

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Asian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 13(10):163-167, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2065385

ABSTRACT

Background: Often, we perceive healthcare from the patient’s point of view. Very seldom do, we think about the doctors, pillars of our health-care system. They have to overcome the journey and faced challenges before fully established. Aims and Objectives: This study aims to explore this area on the perception of doctors about their career, the support they desire and the challenges they face to establishment of their private clinical practices. Materials and Methods: The data were collected from doctors using questionnaires circulated through digital platform during COVID-19 pandemic situation for cross-sectional study. Cluster followed by snowball sampling method was followed to collect the data using two different Google form questionnaires for doctors completed under-graduation and completed postgraduation/super-specialty. Chi-square analysis was used to assess the frequency count variables. Results: The millennial as well as senior doctors have securing financing the highest rank overall as the major challenge, they faced before starting a clinic. Conclusion: Decision-making process of doctors is very complex and dynamic influenced by different factors throughout their career. Factors such as securing post-graduation, securing finance and procuring equipments for the establishment of clinics were found to influence career decision. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Asian Journal of Medical Sciences is the property of Manipal Colleges of Medical Sciences and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

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Ann Med Surg (Lond) ; 83: 104766, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2060329

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 took over the world in 2020 and a lockdown has been imposed seeing its fast spread. Frontline health care workers (HCWs) were reported frequently with a lack of motivation, hesitancy and unwillingness to perform their duties during this pandemic. This cross-sectional survey aims to evaluate the factors associated with lack of motivation and increased hesitancy among the frontline HCWs to perform their duties during COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and methods: A total of 239 HCWs were included in this web-based cross-sectional study, who have worked during the COVID-19 pandemic. The anonymous online questionnaire was sent to all faculty, trainees and staff of Aga Khan University Hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. The survey was conducted from September 2020 to January 2021 during the COVID-19 pandemic. All data was exported into Statistical Package for Social Sciences Version 19 for multivariate analysis. Results: The risk of getting infected was strongly reported by 180 participants, and it was associated with higher hesitation to work (aOR = 6.09 [2.55-14.59]). Fifty-one participants felt that lack of knowledge about prevention and protection was associated with lower motivation to work (aOR = 0.66 [0.35-1.25]). Participants reported higher hesitation due to the burden of changed quality of work, physical exhaustion, mental exhaustion and altered sleep patterns. Sense of feeling protected by their hospitals was a motivating factor, and participants receiving adequate support reported higher motivation to work (aOR = 2.60 [1.32-5.14]). Conclusion: Fear of infection, increased working hours, and inadequate support of the workplace played a key role in escalating the hesitancy among HCWs to perform their duties. Lack of disease knowledge and paucity of personal protective equipment further lowered the motivation levels of HCWs to work effectively during the COVID-19 pandemic.

5.
Chinese Medical Ethics ; 35(8):901-906, 2022.
Article in Chinese | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2056378

ABSTRACT

China has made great, strategic achievements in the struggle against COVID-1 9 epidemic, which shows the profound and rich value of the times of the red doctors’ spirit. It not only give noble occupation responsibility and historical mission to the training of medical students in the new era, but also provide value guidance and action guide. Based on the successful experience of COVID-1 9 prevention and control and the special background of the times, set training objectives guided by the demand of society and universities for medical talents, combined with the ideological reality of medical students at present, actively carry out patriotism education, mental health education, professional ethics education and scientific spirit education for medical students through multiple channels such as strengthen the effectiveness of ideological and political theory curriculum, promote the ideological and political construction of curriculum, give full play to the educational function of various practical activities, and using environmental infiltration method to make red culture “live”, with a view to cultivating medical talents with firm politics, superb medical skills, dedication, both ability and political integrity, being able to take on great responsibilities, and helping the construction and development of a healthy China. © 2022, Editorial department of Chinese Medical Ethics. All rights reserved.

6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055249

ABSTRACT

This study aims to understand the state of emotional exhaustion of Chinese doctors during the COVID-19 pandemic, and explore the role of sports involvement in enhancing doctors' regulatory emotional self-efficacy, reducing stress perception, and alleviating emotional exhaustion. Finally, report the existing problems and make recommendations to the government and hospitals. The researchers constructed a cross-sectional questionnaire survey to collect data. From March to April 2022, using the snowball and convenience sampling methods, a total of 413 valid questionnaires were collected from 13 hospitals in Hunan Province. AMOS 23.0 was used to construct a structural equation model (SEM) with the bootstrapping approach to verify the proposed hypotheses. Doctors with more sports involvement exhibited higher levels of regulatory emotional self-efficacy and lesser perceived stress. Doctors who exhibited higher regulatory emotional self-efficacy had lesser perceived stress. The relationship between sports involvement and emotional exhaustion was mediated by perceived stress and/or regulatory emotional self-efficacy. Therefore, the government and hospitals should strengthen the depth and intensity of implementing the "National Fitness Program" at the hospital level, instead of just holding short-term activities with a small number of participants, but to cover all medical staff with fitness opportunities.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Self Efficacy
7.
Disease Surveillance ; 37(6):720-724, 2022.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2055479

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the risk of public health emergencies, including both indigenous and imported ones, which might occur in the mainland of China in June 2022.

8.
2nd ACM Conference on Information Technology for Social Good, GoodIT 2022 ; : 175-182, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2053348

ABSTRACT

What happened on social media during the recent pandemic? Who was the opinion leader of the conversations? Who influenced whom? Were they medical doctors, ordinary people, scientific experts? Did health institutions play an important role in informing and updating citizens? Identifying opinion leaders within social platforms is of particular importance and, in this paper, we introduce the idea of a time sensitive interaction graph to identify opinion leaders within Twitter conversations. To evaluate our proposal, we focused on all the tweets posted on Twitter in the period 2020-21 and we considered just the ones that were Italian-written and were related to COVID-19. After mapping these tweets into the graph, we applied the PageRank algorithm to extract the opinion leaders of these conversations. Results show that our approach is effective in identifying opinion leaders and therefore it might be used to monitor the role that specific accounts (i.e., health authorities, politicians, city administrators) have within specific conversations. © 2022 ACM.

9.
Africa Health ; 43(3):12-14, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-2046809

ABSTRACT

This article concentrates on the most important COVID-19 data that are relevant to doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals who provide clinical care. The "Infodemic," or flood of false information being spread mostly through social media platforms and unofficial social networks, has hindered the use of vaccines, public health prevention measures, and patient care procedures. Healthcare professionals have a crucial role in both caring for their patients and teaching their communities. They are regarded as reliable sources of up-to-date knowledge. Unfortunately, it can be difficult for healthcare professionals to locate easily available, reliable sources of information. The collaboration between AFREHealth and Stanford University seeks to close this gap by offering training resources from reliable sources that will aid medical professionals in their fight against the widespread misinformation present in their communities. AfreHealth and Stanford University are collaborating to spread a free course that teaches medical professionals how to recognize and treat COVID-19 patients. Evidence to date shows that prompt diagnosis and top-notch treatment can significantly lower mortality rates and stop the spread of infections. In order to effectively care for their patients and be important information sources for their communities, healthcare staff must enhance what they already know with trustworthy information.

10.
Hygiene & Medizin ; 46(3):24-29, 2021.
Article in German | GIM | ID: covidwho-2045580

ABSTRACT

This article identified the source and reason for spread of COVID-19 infection and devise recommendations to halt the progress of infection in a non-COVID area. Results showed that 34 persons were impacted by the outbreak, which lasted from December 19, 2020, to January 12, 2021. Attack frequency was 9.2%. This study determined that inadequacies in infection control procedures, a high bed-to-patient ratio, anomalies in the ventilation system, overcrowding by patient attendants, and a communication gap between nursing officers and doctors were the root causes of the present outbreak. After the last confirmed case, the necessary controls for the outbreak were put in place, and no new instances were recorded for two weeks. SARS-CoV 2 nosocomial outbreaks are a concern in non-COVID hospital settings as well, so it is important to adhere to the same tight infection control procedures there as in COVID areas to stop these outbreaks.

11.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(9): e38497, 2022 09 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2039597

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Shift is a novel smartphone app for providing a digital-first mental health resource to junior doctors. It contains psychoeducational material, cognitive behavioral modules, guided mediations, information on common work stressors, and a section on help-seeking options for psychological problems through workplace and private avenues. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to conduct a preliminary investigation of the use and potential effectiveness of Shift on depressive and anxiety symptoms (primary outcomes) and work and social functioning, COVID-19 safety concerns, and help seeking (secondary outcomes). This study also sought feedback on whether Shift was seen as an acceptable tool. METHODS: Junior doctors in New South Wales, Australia, were approached through promotional activities from the Ministry of Health, specialist medical colleges, and social media advertisements between June and August 2020. Consenting participants provided web-based baseline data, used the Shift app for 30 days, and were asked to complete a poststudy web-based questionnaire. Outcomes were analyzed under the intention-to-treat principle. RESULTS: A total of 222 female (n=156, 70.3%; mean age 29.2, SD 4.61 years) junior doctors provided full baseline data. Of these, 89.2% (198/222) downloaded the app, logged into the app approximately 6 times (mean 5.68, SD 7.51), completed 4 in-app activities (mean 3.77, SD 4.36), and spent a total of 1 hour on in-app activities (mean 52:23, SD 6:00:18) over 30 days. Postintervention and app use data were provided by 24.3% (54/222) of participants. Depressive and anxiety symptoms significantly decreased between the pre- and postassessment points as expected; however, physicians' COVID-19 safety concerns significantly increased. Work and social functioning, COVID-19 concerns for family and friends, and help seeking did not change significantly. There was no significant relationship between symptom changes and app use (number of log-ins, days between first and last log-in, and total activity time). Most poststudy completers (31/54, 57%) rated Shift highly or very highly. CONCLUSIONS: Despite high levels of nonresponse to the poststudy assessment and increases in COVID-19 safety concerns, junior doctors who used the app reported some improvements in depression and anxiety, which warrant further exploration in a robust manner.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Applications , Adult , Female , Humans , Medical Staff, Hospital , Mental Health , Smartphone , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Journal of Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences University ; 17(5):S151-S156, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2040143

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of COVID is one of the greatest public health emergencies of current time. More than 200 countries got affected with this disease. Albeit the medical science has improved a lot along with the technological advancement, the pandemic hit hard on the health system throughout the globe. In some parts of the world, especially the developing world, the overburdened health system got more exacerbated owing to several of the health system issues or the building blocks and India is one such country which faced a lot of health system issues. One of the cardinal building blocks of the health system is the human resources for health or the health workforce that had to face serious challenges in the face of this pandemic. Apart from clinicians, there were other supporting staffs such as public health experts, epidemiologists, microbiologists, disease modeling experts, health communication experts, and many other frontline health workers (HWs) that got engaged in this pandemic. They had to face the pandemic very closely putting their own and family life at stake. The long and protracted working hours in hospital by putting personal protective equipment kit lead to mental health problems. Initially, the HWs faced stigma and discrimination and were labeled as spreaders of infection and were shunned by several communities. In addition to contraction of infection, stress, and burnout, the mortality was also seen to be relatively more among many of the HWs. Deployment and shifting of tasks became a regular phenomenon during the pandemic. Many states in India make provision to incentivize, motivate, award, and provide security to the HWs however that became miniscule in front of such a monstrous pandemic. This article critically analyzes the issues of health-care workers during the pandemic with special reference to India. © 2022 Wolters Kluwer Medknow Publications. All rights reserved.

13.
Veterinarski Glasnik ; 74(1):1-17, 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2039613

ABSTRACT

Background. Coronaviruses (CoVs) have been recognized in veterinary virology for a long time and comprise a large group of RNA viruses responsible for enteric, respiratory, hepatic, and neurologic diseases in a variety of animal species and humans. These viruses are very adaptable considering their highly error-prone replication process and recombination ability, resulting in remarkable mutability and efficient expansion of their host range and tissue tropism. Scope and Approach. In the recent past, after the outbreaks caused by SARS-CoV in 2002 and MERS-CoV in 2012, CoVs became a research focus in the scientific community. Moreover, the ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic raised more questions concerning the threats posed by these viruses. Several significant examples of coronaviruses jumping the species barrier and changing their tropism have been reported in the past, and novel viruses of both animals and humans have appeared as a consequence. This paper reviews some of the examples of CoV mutability and the most notable animal coronaviruses of veterinary relevance. Key Findings and Conclusions. There is still no proof that the novel virus SARS-CoV-2 can be transmitted to humans from domestic animals, and its recent cross-species jump is currently being intensively researched. Intensified and diverse human activities that lead to the disruption of ecosystems contribute to the increased risk of contact with animals that might represent virus reservoirs. The need for constant surveillance of CoVs and expanded studies of their virological traits, mutation mechanisms, diversity, prophylactic and therapeutic measures highlight the key role of both veterinarians and medical doctors in order to preserve the health of the human population.

14.
PLoS Global Public Health ; 2(8), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2039232

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to have substantial impacts on health systems globally. This study describes experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic, and physical, psychological and economic impacts among maternal and newborn healthcare providers. We conducted a global online cross-sectional survey of maternal and newborn healthcare providers. Data collected between July and December 2020 included demographic characteristics, work-related experiences, and physical, psychological, and economic impacts of COVID-19. Descriptive statistics of quantitative data and content analysis of qualitative data were conducted. Findings were disaggregated by country income-level. We analysed responses from 1,191 maternal and newborn healthcare providers from 77 countries: middle-income 66%, high-income 27%, and low-income 7%. Most common cadres were nurses (31%), midwives/nurse-midwives (25%), and obstetricians/gynaecologists (21%). Quantitative and qualitative findings showed that 28% of respondents reported decreased workplace staffing levels following changes in staff-rotation (53%) and staff self-isolating after exposure to SARS-CoV-2 (35%);this led to spending less time with patients, possibly compromising care quality. Reported insufficient access to personal protective equipment (PPE) ranged from 12% for gloves to 32% for N-95 masks. Nonetheless, wearing PPE was tiresome, time-consuming, and presented potential communication barriers with patients. 58% of respondents reported higher stress levels, mainly related to lack of access to information or to rapidly changing guidelines. Respondents noted a negative financial impact-a decrease in income (70% among respondents from low-income countries) concurrently with increased personal expenditures (medical supplies, transportation, and PPE). Negative physical, psychological and economic impacts of COVID-19 on maternal and newborn healthcare providers were ongoing throughout 2020, especially in low-income countries. This can have severe consequences for provision and quality of essential care. There is need to increase focus on the implementation of interventions aiming to support healthcare providers, particularly those in low- and middle-income countries to protect essential health services from disruption.

15.
PLoS Global Public Health ; 2(8), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2039229

ABSTRACT

While vaccines are now authorized for use against the SARS-CoV2 virus, they remain inaccessible for much of the world and widespread hesitancy persists. Ending the COVID-19 pandemic depends on continued prevention behaviors such as mask wearing, distancing, hand hygiene, and limiting large gatherings. Research in low- and middle-income countries has focused on the prevalence of adherence and demographic determinants, but there is a need for a nuanced understanding of why people do or do not practice a given prevention behavior. The Breakthrough ACTION project led by Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs conducted a qualitative study in November 2020 in Cote d'Ivoire to explore people's experience with and perceptions of the COVID-19 pandemic. We conducted 24 focus group discussions and 29 in-depth interviews with members of the general population and health providers. This analysis explores barriers and facilitators to seven recommended prevention behaviors with a particular focus on response efficacy, self-efficacy, and social norms. We found these constructs to be salient for participants who generally felt that the behaviors were useful for preventing COVID-19 but were difficult to practice for a variety of reasons. The perception that COVID-19 prevention behaviors were anti-social emerged as a key theme. Behavior change interventions must reframe the recommended behaviors as pro-social, while making them very easy to practice by removing social and structural barriers such as the expense or inaccessibility of masks and hand sanitizer.

16.
Global Health ; 18(1): 81, 2022 09 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038823

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The use of telemedicine, or the provision of healthcare and communication services through distance-based technologies, has increased substantially since the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. However, it is still unclear what are the innovative features of the widespread use of such modality, its forms of employment and the context in which it is used across pluralist health systems, particularly in low- and middle-income settings. We have sought to provide empirical evidence on the above issues by analysing the responses of medical doctors in a representative cross-sectional survey in two states in Brazil: São Paulo and Maranhão. METHODS: We analysed the responses of 1,183 physicians to a survey on the impact of COVID-19 on their livelihood and working practice. Two independent samples per state were calculated based on a total of 152,511 active medical registries in São Paulo and Maranhão. Proportional stratified sampling was performed and the distributions for gender, age, state and location of address (capital or countryside) were preserved. The survey contained questions on the frequency of physicians' employment of telemedicine services; the specific activities where these were employed, and; the forms in which the pandemic had influenced the adoption or consolidation of this technology. We performed descriptive and univariate analysis based on the chi-square test or Fisher's exact test for the qualitative data, and the Mann-Whitney test in the quantitative cases. Data were shown as absolute frequency and proportion with a 95% confidence interval. RESULTS: In our sample of physicians, telemedicine was employed as a form of clinical collaboration by most doctors (76.0%, 95 CI 73.6-78.5), but only less than a third of them (30.6%, 95 CI 28.0-33.3) used it as a modality to provide healthcare services. During the pandemic, telemedicine was used predominantly in COVID-19-related areas, particularly for hospital-based in-patient services, and in private clinics and ambulatory settings. Male, younger doctors used it the most. Doctors in São Paulo employed telemedicine more frequently than in Maranhão (p < 0.001), in urban settings more than in rural areas (p < 0.001). Approximately three-quarters of doctors in large hospitals reported using telemedicine services (78.3%, 95 CI 75.9-80.6), followed by doctors working for smaller private clinics (66.4%, 95 CI 63.7-69.1), and by a smaller proportion of primary care doctors (58.4%, 95 CI 55.6-61.2). CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that telemedicine may have helped ensure and expand the range of communication and healthcare services in low- and middle-income settings during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the modality appears to lend itself to be disproportionally used by doctors working in specific, priviledged sections of pluralistic health systems, and presumably by patients seeking care there. Regulation and incentives will be required to support the use of the technology across health systems in low- and middle-income countries in order to increase access to services for less disadvantaged populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Telemedicine , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Male , Pandemics
17.
Boletin de Malariologia y Salud Ambiental ; 61(Edicion Especial II 2021):114-122, 2021.
Article in Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2033749

ABSTRACT

Due to the pandemic, an increase in mental health problems has been reported in members of the health personnel, with the self-report being an initial way of evaluating it. The objective was to determine the factors associated with the perception of repercussions in the mental sphere in health professionals in Latin America before COVID-19. An analytical cross-sectional study was carried out between June and August 2020 in Latin America. The perception of repercussions was measured through an instrument previously validated in Peru, which was taken virtually from 406 doctors, nurses and others;this was crossed versus other variables. The main concern was returning home and infecting their family (22% strongly agree), followed by feeling the abuse because they do not give them the necessary amount of personal protective equipment (13% strongly agree) and perceiving mental exhaustion for all the activities they did (12% strongly agree). In the multivariate analysis, the older there was a lower perception of mental repercussion (aPR: 0.98;95% CI: 0.97-0.99;p value = 0.012);In addition, those who had a greater perception of repercussions in the mental sphere also had more anxiety at a low level (aPR: 1.84;95% CI: 1.14-2.98;p value = 0.013) and post-traumatic stress (aPR: 2.28;95% CI: 1.61-3.22;p value <0.001), adjusted for depression and stress. Despite being an exploratory analysis, important associations were found in the mental sphere;which should continue to be investigated in larger studies.

18.
Dialogues in Health ; : 100044, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2031235

ABSTRACT

Objectives Adult immunisation has recently emerged as an area of emphasis in research and policy. Increasing life expectancy, outbreaks like COVID-19, and the endemic nature of diseases like dengue, malaria have underscored its importance. Therefore, this study was carried out to assess hesitancy and the factors influencing the uptake of vaccines in adults. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among the medical students and doctors affiliated to a medical college and tertiary care hospital in Delhi, India and their immediate family members in January 2021. Online data collection was done using the Google Form platforms. Data on awareness and perceptions regarding adult vaccination and immunisation status of participants was collected. The dataset was exported in the Microsoft Excel format and analysed with IBM SPSS Version 25 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp). Results A total of 461 adults responded to the survey. The most common reasons for vaccine hesitancy were fear of side effects (51.41%), lack of awareness of vaccines (49.46%), and the lack of national guidelines on adult vaccination (32.97%). Hesitancy for vaccines among those who were informed by healthcare workers of vaccine availability was highest for zoster vaccine (97.80%) and least for tetanus toxoid (57.62%). Significant hesitancy was also observed for pneumococcal, human papillomavirus, influenza and varicella vaccines. Conclusions Reduced vaccine uptake due to vaccine hesitancy in adulthood is a major health concern. Framing national guidelines for adult vaccination in India and awareness generation to create a public demand for adult vaccination warrants prioritization.

19.
Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol ; 2022 Sep 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029269

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID pandemic has highlighted the stresses experienced by our medical workforce, with worldwide publications attesting to high rates of depression, anxiety and burnout, particularly in junior doctors. Many studies focus on reporting on the prevalence of mental health issues, but not many report on interventional strategies. One of the most stressful interactions in the day of a junior doctor is the medical handover. The incorporation of kindness into clinical handover has coined the term 'KISBAR' to underline the importance of delivering handover in a kind manner. AIM: The aim is to analyse the efficacy of a novel intervention by introducing an emotional support representative to participate in the morning labour ward handover. METHODS: We undertook an ethnographic constructivist qualitative research project in a tertiary hospital in Perth, Western Australia, using focus groups to explore the views of junior medical staff on the KISBAR handover tool in the specific context of labour ward handover. Fifty per cent of the total junior doctors from the hospital participated in this study. RESULTS: Four dominant themes arose from analysis of the focus group discussions: (i) inherent stress experienced by junior doctors during the labour ward handover process, (ii) support strategies for junior doctors during labour ward handover; (iii) role modelling and the hidden curriculum aspects of communication from senior doctors at labour ward handover; and (iv) benefit of having an emotional support person present for labour ward handover. CONCLUSION: Our study confirmed the benefit of having an emotional support person present at labour ward handover: improved perception of safety and an environment that junior doctors found to be supportive. This is a novel and reproducible interventional strategy which is applicable to various obstetric units around Australia.

20.
2022 IEEE International Conference on Communications, ICC 2022 ; 2022-May:2580-2585, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2029227

ABSTRACT

COVID which is one of the deadliest Pandemic of this era stuck the entire world which emerged from Wuhan, China in 2019. The pandemic had an extensive impact on unemployment and even deaths. This Pandemic was so new that a lot of medical doctors were involved in research towards diagnosing the chest X-ray images for COVID symptoms. Along with COVID, there have been other complications found like Pneumonia which resulted in the second wave of COVID leading to deaths. There has been good research done by Deep learning researchers in predicting the COVID and also COVID with Pneumonia classification based on Chest X-rays. But the challenge in earlier work is the limited data set which ultimately resulted in higher accuracy. The reason being smaller data set had very fewer number features for training which ultimately resulted in higher accuracy during prediction. So, towards obviating the above-mentioned challenge, we here have collected a fairly larger data set for better prediction. In addition, authors have proposed Convolution Neural Network - Long Short-Term Memory (CNN-LSTM) model by allowing ResNEt-101 as pretrained model for CNN along with other pretrained deep learning models like ResNEt-101, Inception V3, DenseNET-169, and Inception-ResNET V2. In addition to the prediction of chest X-ray images into different classes as COVID, COVID with Pneumonia, Viral Pneumonia, and Healthy, GradCAM has been used for giving a visual explanation for deep learning model resulting in higher accuracy which are ResNET-101, DenseNET-169 and CNN-LSTM. The GradCAM shows the Model built can predict the image perfectly. These would be stored in Cloud for access by doctors for medication. © 2022 IEEE.

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